Questlove & Black Thought Discuss Forthcoming ‘Hamilton’ Mixtape With Usher, Sia, Chance The Rapper, And More

first_imgGet ready Hamilton fans, as a ridiculous, Hamilton-inspired mixtape is headed your way this Fall. Due to come out some time in October, according to Billboard, the mixtape will be produced by Questlove and Black Thought of The Roots, and will feature guest appearances by, Usher, Sia, Chance The Rapper, Busta Rhymes, and Ben Folds, among others.While the project was originally discussed by show creator Lin Manuel Miranda on his Twitter account back in October 2015, it has taken a little time to make the mixtape happen, with ?uestlove and Black Thought too consumed with crafting the cast album for the play, before turning their attention to the mixtape. The project is said to include covers from the show, which has a stellar soundtrack, as performed by popular artists, along with songs inspired by the play. Questlove had this to say about the project:“We’re in the final stages. We were brought in to produce the cast album and now the massive success of that album is leading to the original idea. Hamilton started out as an idea for a mixtape and nothing else. Then they were like, ‘Let’s do this play first and see what happens.’ So this is the ‘see what happens’ part.”With such a diverse lineup, an interesting theme, and the master of pop culture–?uestlove–in the driver’s seat, we’re definitely looking forward to listening to this unique mixtape when it comes out!last_img read more

Watch Patti Smith Perform Bob Dylan In His Place At Nobel Prize Gala

first_imgBob Dylan was chosen to receive the Nobel Prize In Literature back in October. It took about two weeks before the poet/songwriter acknowledged his honor. “Isn’t that something?,” he said, before opening up a bit more. “It’s hard to believe… amazing, incredible. Whoever dreams about something like that?” The ceremony for his 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature took place last night in Stockholm, Swede, though Dylan did not attend due to “existing commitments.”Instead, Dylan sent Patti Smith in his place who performed “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” with accompaniment from an orchestra. “I apologize, I’m so nervous,” she explained after mistakenly repeating a line of the song and being forced to start the verse over. The audience, of course, applauded Smith for her actions nonetheless.Watch her performance below:Professor Horace Engdahl of the Swedish Academy delivered the introductory speech, explaining why Dylan was worthy of such high honors. Read the full transcription below:What brings about the great shifts in the world of literature? Often it is when someone seizes upon a simple, overlooked form, discounted as art in the higher sense, and makes it mutate. Thus, at one point, emerged the modern novel from anecdote and letter, thus arose drama in a new age from high jinx on planks placed on barrels in a marketplace, thus songs in the vernacular dethroned learned Latin poetry, thus too did La Fontaine take animal fables and Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales from the nursery to Parnassian heights. Each time this occurs, our idea of literature changes.In itself, it ought not to be a sensation that a singer/songwriter now stands recipient of the literary Nobel Prize. In a distant past, all poetry was sung or tunefully recited, poets were rhapsodes, bards, troubadours; ‘lyrics’ comes from ‘lyre’. But what Bob Dylan did was not to return to the Greeks or the Provençals. Instead, he dedicated himself body and soul to 20th century American popular music, the kind played on radio stations and gramophone records for ordinary people, white and black: protest songs, country, blues, early rock, gospel, mainstream music. He listened day and night, testing the stuff on his instruments, trying to learn. But when he started to write similar songs, they came out differently. In his hands, the material changed. From what he discovered in heirloom and scrap, in banal rhyme and quick wit, in curses and pious prayers, sweet nothings and crude jokes, he panned poetry gold, whether on purpose or by accident is irrelevant; all creativity begins in imitation.Even after fifty years of uninterrupted exposure, we are yet to absorb music’s equivalent of the fable’s Flying Dutchman. He makes good rhymes, said a critic, explaining greatness. And it is true. His rhyming is an alchemical substance that dissolves contexts to create new ones, scarcely containable by the human brain. It was a shock. With the public expecting poppy folk songs, there stood a young man with a guitar, fusing the languages of the street and the bible into a compound that would have made the end of the world seem a superfluous replay. At the same time, he sang of love with a power of conviction everyone wants to own. All of a sudden, much of the bookish poetry in our world felt aenemic, and the routine song lyrics his colleagues continued to write were like old-fashioned gunpowder following the invention of dynamite. Soon, people stopped comparing him to Woody Guthrie and Hank Williams and turned instead to Blake, Rimbaud, Whitman, Shakespeare.In the most unlikely setting of all – the commercial gramophone record – he gave back to the language of poetry its elevated style, lost since the Romantics. Not to sing of eternities, but to speak of what was happening around us. As if the oracle of Delphi were reading the evening news.Recognizing that revolution by awarding Bob Dylan the Nobel Prize was a decision that seemed daring only beforehand and already seems obvious. But does he get the prize for upsetting the system of literature? Not really. There is a simpler explanation, one that we share with all those who stand with beating hearts in front of the stage at one of the venues on his never-ending tour, waiting for that magical voice. Chamfort made the observation that when a master such as La Fontaine appears, the hierarchy of genres – the estimation of what is great and small, high and low in literature – is nullified. “What matter the rank of a work when its beauty is of the highest rank?” he wrote. That is the straight answer to the question of how Bob Dylan belongs in literature: as the beauty of his songs is of the highest rank.By means of his oeuvre, Bob Dylan has changed our idea of what poetry can be and how it can work. He is a singer worthy of a place beside the Greeks’ ἀοιδόι, beside Ovid, beside the Romantic visionaries, beside the kings and queens of the Blues, beside the forgotten masters of brilliant standards. If people in the literary world groan, one must remind them that the gods don’t write, they dance and they sing. The good wishes of the Swedish Academy follow Mr. Dylan on his way to coming bandstands.[H/T CoS]last_img read more

Alan Mingo Jr. Begins Performances in Kinky Boots on Broadway

first_img View Comments Related Shows Alan Mingo Jr. in ‘Kinky Boots’ Photo by Matthew Murphy Kinky Bootscenter_img Step into a dream, Alan Mingo Jr.! Toronto’s Lola will lead Broadway’s kinky revolution beginning March 29. As the new headliner of the Tony-winning Kinky Boots, Mingo will replace Wayne Brady, who played his final performance at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on March 27.The Great White Way’s latest Lola has been seen on Broadway as Sebastian in Disney’s The Little Mermaid and Tom Collins in Rent. Other stage credits include Shrek the Musical, Hairspray and The Lion King.The musical, featuring a score by Cyndi Lauper and a book by Harvey Fierstein, won six Tonys in 2013 including Best Musical. The cast also currently includes Andy Kelso, Jeanna de Waal, Daniel Stewart Sherman, Cortney Wolfson and Marcus Neville. Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019last_img read more

Your Top 10 Fave Judith Light Roles

first_imgAngela Bower, Who’s the Boss Faye,The Assembled Parties Judith Light begins performances in All the Ways to Say I Love You, Tony nominee Neil Labute’s solo play, on September 6. In honor of her return to the New York stage in a one-woman drama (and highly anticipated comeback to the small screen for Transparent season 3 on September 23), we asked you to rank your favorite Judith Light roles. Though the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner is nominated for an Emmy this year for her performance in Transparent, a throwback screen role was the fan favorite, as were her Tony-winning roles. Take a look at your top 10 below! Judith Ryland, Dallas Karen Wolek, One Life to Live Elizabeth Donnelly, Law & Order: SVU Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 23, 2016 Jeanne White, The Ryan White Story Shelly Pfefferman, Transparent Silda Grauman, Other Desert Cities Claire Meade, Ugly Betty View Comments All the Ways To Say I Love You Vivian Bearing, Witlast_img read more

Slain boy’s wounded mother speaks at memorial

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.The memorial at Calvary Community Church featured harps and violins and a video slide show highlighting the short but impactful life of Sev’n, a handsome child with kind eyes. Ruiz was so touched by the outpouring of support from the community that she decided to have a memorial for her son, which also featured touching words from family members, school officials and church leaders. “Dear friend,” she wrote on the memorial program. “You have brought hope to a soul that was on the verge of giving up on hope. For surely, after the night of Aug. 12, how could I still believe in hope?” That was the night Calvin Leonard Sharp, 27, allegedly chased her and her son outside their apartment in the 1800 block of Hillcrest Drive with a meat cleaver. He ended up killing him and putting her in the hospital. A 53-year-old woman who lived at the complex intervened and was slashed in the face, but managed to wrestle the weapon away from Sharp, who was later arrested at the scene by police. Sharp is charged with murder and is in Ventura County Jail with bail set at $1.5 million. His next court appearance is scheduled for Jan. 14. Following Sev’n’s death, Ventura County firefighters and police officers squared off in September in a charity basketball game that raised more than $8,000. The money was donated to the Sandra Ruiz Family Fund. During Friday’s ceremony, Mary McLemore spoke of how she used to take care of Sev’n after school. She said he was “one of a kind.” “He had a charming nature and his favorite expression was, `But why?”‘ McLemore said – and when she heard of his death, all she could do was ask the same question. “God wants beautiful flowers in his garden, and Sev’n was a beautiful boy,” she said. The Rev. Steven Day of Calvary Community Church praised Ruiz and her amazing courage and reassured her that her son knew how much he was loved. “He loved completely and he loved fully,” Day said, “and was loved completely and was loved fully.” As she continues to recover, Ruiz has found comfort in Scripture. During Friday’s ceremony, she shared an apt passage. “Do not be overcome by evil,” she said, “but overcome evil with good.” [email protected] (818) 713-3329 How to help If you want to help the family of Sev’n Molina, please send checks to the Sandra Ruiz Family Benefit Fund, c/o Rabobank, attention Kate Oswald, 6401 E. Telephone Road, Ventura, CA 93003.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! THOUSAND OAKS – Two months removed from a vicious attack that took her young son’s life and left her near death, Sandra Ruiz stood behind a church lectern Friday, remarkably composed and strong. She was there to honor the life of her 6-year-old boy, Sev’n, killed by a man wielding a meat cleaver in an assault that shook the community to its core for its sheer viscousness. And she was there to let the 150 people in attendance – relatives, Amgen co-workers, sheriff’s deputies and firefighters – know that she was OK. “In my life, I have never known a greater love than the love I shared with my child, Sev’n,” said Ruiz, 33, who was severely injured in the attack and is still recovering. “It’s stronger now.” last_img