Jamie Heaslip’s charity work

first_imgBut there is more to him than meets the eye. Away from rugby, Heaslip is involved with the Irish humanitarian charity GOAL, which works in countries across the world helping “the poorest of the poor”. In the summer of 2011, Heaslip went to Kolkata, India, to see for himself the work that GOAL had been doing. Round of applause: Jamie Heaslip celebrates Ireland’s win over Australia at the World CupJAMIE HEASLIP is best known for his feats on the rugby field for Leinster and Ireland. After all, he has starred on the world stage with strong performances from No 8 – carrying the ball into the heart of the opposition, demonstrating surprisingly good handling skills for a forward and proving himself to be a mature head in attack and defence. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Lions tour travel guide: Brisbane, Queensland’s historic capital

first_imgHave a good one, and keep us posted with pics from your trip on our Facebook and Twitter accounts! City in bloom: the Brisbane River is named after a former Governer of NSW, Scotsman Sir Thomas BrisbaneBy Deputy Editor Alan PeareyARE YOU one of the lucky fans who gets to experience this year’s Lions tour to Australia? Well, we’ve compiled a summary of the best things to do in each Test-match city during your down time. Our first stop is Brisbane, which will host the first Test on 22 June.Whether it’s kayaking up the Brisbane River or supping the local beer on a brewery tour, we’ve done the digging so you don’t have to. Click here to download your copy. You can also save it to a mobile or tablet device and take it on your travels! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

New Zealand v England: Five things we’ve learnt

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Now to start on the positives, beginning with a superb display from a fly-half who defied sofa doubters. Although he should take a modicum of blame for the above, Freddie Burns was magnificent on the whole – marrying a varied passing game with exceptional poise from the tee and underrated bravery in defence.It was as if a dreadful season for Gloucester was nothing but a nightmare and this was his first outing since 2013’s assured trip to Argentina. Whatever went on behind the scenes at Kingsholm, it’s obvious Burns responds better to Lancaster than he did Nigel Davies.The 24 year-old thrives on responsibility and was told to take it with George Ford injured. He reportedly bossed training for a fortnight and brought that same authority to Eden Park, reinforcing the permanence of class. After an eye-catching shift from little brother Billy in England U20’s defeat of Australia on Friday, Freddie came to the party as well. Besides any international prospects, Leicester Tigers fans should be elated. He could easily become a Welford Road legend.Comeback kingsQuestion: Apart from being key figures in England’s admirable effort, what else do Rob Webber, Kyle Eastmond, Geoff Parling, Ben Youngs, Manu Tuilagi and James Haskell (as well as Burns) have in common? Answer: None of them had started a Test match for at least 12 months. Then there was Danny Cipriani, whose first two touches after a six-year international hiatus were a slicing half-break and a nerveless penalty.Unfair as it is to single out individuals, Webber and Parling deserve special praise. The lineout was highlighted as a crucial platform and England’s axis delivered a 100% return from 13 throws, only one resulting in messy possession – brilliant accuracy and implementation of basic skills.All this is of course testament to England’s strength in depth, but also a coaching team that can prepare a group of players for the rigours of Test rugby whatever the circumstances.Wrecking ball: Manu Tuilagi caused New Zealand’s defence no end of problems in the opening TestHappy headaches…but Manu’s not for movingA further 16 players now become available to Lancaster from Saracens and Northampton. Danny Care and Billy Twelvetrees are fit for Dunedin too. But 41 into 23 doesn’t go. This is perhaps the most enticing selection debate for England in the professional era. Should Billy Vunipola replace the phenomenal Ben Morgan? Does Jonny May’s electric pace make up for uncertainty elsewhere?The midfield is the most pain-staking piece of the jigsaw. Kyle Eastmond was excellent, but Twelvetrees brings a kicking game that would help the pack play in dangerous areas. Leaving out Luther Burrell is mighty brave. Fire starters: New Zealand perform the haka before the first Test against England, which they won 20-15 Whoever Lancaster fills the 12 shirt with, Tuilagi will stay at outside-centre. Sir Clive Woodward’s suggestion to shift him onto the flank is a non-starter. Wing is the hardest place to play in England’s defensive system and, beating five defenders from 14 carries in Auckland, Tuilagi has a role from which he can influence and intimidate. If it ain’t broke…Read all about Danny Care, Danny Cipriani and Israel Dagg in the latest edition of Rugby World – and you can find out where to buy your copy here. Download the digital edition here. After the narrow defeat in Auckland, what areas do England need to address ahead of the second Test against New Zealand in Dunedin? TAGS: Highlight STUART LANCASTER stressed last week that victory at Eden Park was very possible. Few believed him, most earmarking damage limitation as a more realistic goal.But England’s coach wasn’t bidding to manufacture false confidence. His belief was rock-solid, and a supposedly understrength team backed up that conviction with an ambitious performance. Even so, it wasn’t enough to derail the world champions’ 32-match unbeaten run in Auckland. Conrad Smith’s last-gasp try snuck New Zealand into a 1-0 series lead.Here are five things for England to heed following a superbly tense Test match…The All Blacks won’t be that bad againRealism is Lancaster’s currency, so he won’t sugar-coat any details of defeat. In fact, his first port of call will be to underline how poor New Zealand were. Just as during their first game of 2013 against France, the hosts seemed subdued.At times, David Wilson and Joe Marler mangled their scrum. Collectively, the All Black back-line made elementary (almost Wilson-esque) handling errors. Ma’a Nonu was abject, Richie McCaw largely anonymous. Steve Hansen’s men benefited most from an iffy day at the office for referee Nigel Owens, too.Though undercooked and maybe complacent, New Zealand still pulled through with a sense of grim inevitability. Liam Messam and Jerome Kaino provided awesome grit, Aaron Smith amazing guile. Many more will turn up on Saturday. Winning is a habit and the All Blacks are addicted – the really hard work starts now for Lancaster’s charges.Familiar fine-tuningTwo lessons will lead England’s search for improvement this week. Both are subtle, yet frustratingly familiar. First, the tourists’ eventual downfall came from playing too much rugby inside their own half. Just before half-time and during the second period – most prominently while Marland Yarde was in the sin-bin – a failure to clear invited the All Blacks onto the front foot. They flooded the breakdown for three cheap penalties and, after kicking two and tapping one, gathered 11 points.Those moments of suffocation were faintly reminiscent of what brought about England’s 30-3 defeat to Wales last March. Exit strategies – essentially the practice of getting back into opposition territory from set-piece or restart – are vital areas to iron out.The second work-on is a continuing quibble from the recent Six Nations – turning opportunities into tries. Granted, things might have gone differently but for two cynical shirt-tugs from Nonu that definitely deserved yellow, but England made eight line breaks to New Zealand’s five. They beat more defenders (22 to 13) and executed twice as many offloads (eight to four). Such statistics need to translate into five-pointers.Steady Freddie: Burns, after a poor season for Gloucester, excelled at fly-half in AucklandFantastic Fred backs up Billylast_img read more

Guinness Pro12 final preview: Glasgow Warriors v Munster

first_imgGalloping Gray: Jonny Gray scores against Munster earlier in the season LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WE ALL want a free-running Guinness Pro12 final, don’t we?The obvious question has to be asked because when both Glasgow Warriors and Munster pick themselves off the Ravenhill turf and one is declared the winner, so much of the narrative afterwards could be about the personnel missing from the showcase and either the heartbreak of another lost final, or possibly the sad ending to a glorious provincial career. So lets get out ahead of that right now.The prevailing logic is that this contest should be as close and as brutal as a straight-razor shave on a park swing. But it needn’t be. Munster have a traditional style of play and a well-drilled maul. Fine. Glasgow have Rob Harley and Josh Strauss as their back-row bombers, making nuisances of themselves. Cool. Munster have no Peter O’Mahony or a metronomic Conor Murray. Alright. And Glasgow have for some reason excluded a fit and exciting Adam Ashe.Enough already, let’s look at the positives (though some of them, admittedly, are positives for the neutrals).There are superb ball carriers on show. Like a bottle of Absinthe emptied into the punch, Munster back-rower CJ Stander can take your legs away without you realising it. He is in devastating form and with Paddy Butler deputising there is a feeling that the pair could symbiotically carry as a pair, over every blade of grass. Mind you, if you need someone to make a rude, hard, one-metre dunt there is no one better in the business than Paul O’Connell – the man who could be calling time on his, er, time with Munster following this final.Let loose: Can Simon Zebo scare the Glasgow defensive line?Mind you, Glasgow could let Strauss truck it up in the middle of the park all day, with Jonny Gray doing a very decent O’Connell impersonation. Or, for the sake of our entertainment, lock Leone Nakarawa could be allowed to juggle and slide into contact, popping out squinty offloads that catch defenders off-guard and have you fumbling for the rewind button on your remote control.The kicking should have an air of uncertainty about it. We all know Ian Keatley had a debilitating case of the yips in the semi-final against Ospreys, and no matter how much we get told about the “next job” mentality of modern rugby players, he will have needed a salve and a cuddle this week. But there is enough dinks and chips and chases in that Munster back-line to ensure that develment is there, should they opt for a slog-less display. Glasgow Warriors: Stuart Hogg, Tommy Seymour, Richie Vernon, Peter Horne, DTH van der Merwe, Finn Russell, Henry Pyrgos; Gordon Reid, Dougie Hall, Rossouw de Klerk, Leone Nakarawa, Jonny Gray, Rob Harley, Ryan Wilson, Josh Strauss (Captain)Replacements: Fraser Brown, Jerry Yanuyanutawa, Jon Welsh, Al Kellock, Chris Fusaro, Niko Matawalu, Duncan Weir, Sean LamontMunster: Felix Jones; Keith Earls, Andrew Smith, Denis Hurley – capt., Simon Zebo; Ian Keatley, Duncan Williams; Dave Kilcoyne, Eusebio Guinazu, BJ Botha; Billy Holland, Paul O’Connell; Donnacha Ryan, Paddy Butler, CJ Stander.Replacements: Duncan Casey, James Cronin, Stephen Archer, Sean Dougall, Jack O’Donoghue, Cathal Sheridan, JJ Hanrahan, Ronan O’Mahony.center_img Opposite them, Finn Russell may be beaming after a fine conversion from the touchline that won Glasgow their semi against Ulster, but there are so many options for clearing lines that it can be confusing for those unaccustomed to the Warriors’ way. Pete Horne at 12 can slid in behind his 13, Richie Vernon, to dispatch a left-footed clearance from their own half. Stuart Hogg can put more metres between himself and the ball than you’re average long-distance relationship from tee or hand and Henry Pyrgos has a neat box-kick.Force for good: Nigel Owens should help the game flowThen there is the referee. Do not forget the fact that Nigel Owens is in the middle. Flow and touch are so important to Owens, that while he does not get every single call right, we need not be sticklers about it. He has a feel for the game that should be allowed to grace major finals… perhaps not for the last time in 2015. The players should make the most of his whistling.The only other thing that can help contribute to the positive emotion of the last game of the Pro12 final is the crowd itself. Here’s hoping that they are in good voice and get the display they deserve. The semi-finals were crackers and cheered on in the right way. We should really have more of the same, right?Let’s have a go, fellas…Kick-off: 6.30pm, Ravenhill TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsMunster last_img read more

Meet Ireland’s new openside, Josh van der Flier

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight His housemates are sure to keep his feet on the ground. He lives with three Leinster Academy players – Tom Daly, Peter Dooley and Adam Byrne – and another two lads from UCD. It must be a lively house, with a big fridge to hold enough food for all those hungry mouths. “We have two fridges!” he laughs. “And we don’t all eat together – we don’t have a big enough pot to cook for us all!”Starting both European Champions Cup clashes with Toulon, van der Flier set himself a target of matching his highly acclaimed opposite number Steffon Armitage. “I didn’t quite achieve that but I learnt a lot, especially positioning-wise. At the breakdown he is impossible to move once he is on the ball. It was difficult to tackle him too.”The physicality and pace of the game has been a step up for van der Flier, but he has adapted and is ready to help Leinster chase the Pro12 title. They finished outside the top-four last year for the first time since 2004, so are keen to make amends. “Our goal is a home semi-final for the Pro12, or first place ideally. There was disappointment about the results in Europe and that has an effect on the squad, but we’ve been good with bouncing back and are motivated to try to win the Pro12.“There is a lot of confidence. The more games we’ve had, the better we’re playing as a group. Our defence has been the most pleasing thing and we’ve been gelling better.”Off to a flyer: Josh van der Flier on the attack for Leinster. (Photo: Inpho)Van der Flier attended his first Ireland camp at the start of January and says: “It was quite intense, with a lot of catching up to do. I knew if I could play well with Leinster then maybe a chance of a place in a training squad or a call-up would be on the cards, but I wasn’t really thinking about it.” However, we can still say the Leinster openside’s career has undergone a jet-propelled take-off. From two Guinness Pro12 starts last season to Ireland’s Six Nations team now is a steep climb, but van der Flier is looking at home among Leinster’s stars and is impressing Joe Schmidt.His father’s parents moved to Ireland from the Netherlands in the 1950s. One of their sons, Dirk, was a useful rugby player, representing Leinster U21, and he introduced his two sons, Johan and Joshua, to the game at Wicklow.Dirk coached Johan’s team and Josh joined in with the U8s training from the age of five. He worked his way through the Wicklow age grades before heading to Wesley College in Dublin as a boarder and continuing his rugby there. Van de Flier stands 6ft 1in tall now, but for years he was one of his teams’ smaller boys.Three’s company: enjoying a giggle at Ireland training with Jamie Heaslip. (Photo: Inpho)“I played scrum-half until I was 14, then I was moved to flanker because I was getting into too many rucks and there was no one to pass the ball,” he laughs. He played No 8 in his last few years at school, dabbled at blindside for UCD, but is now concentrating on openside.The Leinster Academy coaches, plus Leo Cullen and his predecessor Matt O’Connor, all worked hard last term to help the young flanker make the step up to the senior game and he is passing all the tests with flying colours – something he also hopes to do this spring as he completes his sports management degree.Last season van der Flier, 22, played most of his rugby for Leinster A and UCD, but he had high hopes of stepping up this term. “With players away at the World Cup, the goal was to get as much game time as I could during that period and if I could play well enough I’d be able to stay in the frame afterwards,” he says. “It’s worked out that way, which is brilliant.Tough test: Facing Toulon in the Champions Cup was a big deal for van der Flier. (Photo: Inpho)“Even though I had the goal to play this many games, it is still surreal when you get to play in big games, like my first European game against Bath (he scored after coming off the bench in the 19-16 loss) and playing Toulon with that calibre of player.” Make way: Josh Van Der Flier has forced his way into the Ireland team. (Photo: Inpho) Dutch heritage is responsible for Josh van der Flier’s surname and also dictates that it is pronounced “fleer” not “flyer”, so is slightly less of a headline-writer’s dream. Now his first cap is within touching distance. If he handles the step up to Test rugby as well as he handled the move into the Leinster team, he will enjoy himself.For the latest Rugby World magazine subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgGloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Team A v Team B kicks off at 8.45pm on SuperSport Variety 1.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Gloucester v Harlequins from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 6.45am on Tuesday on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch the Premiership match online from anywhereUp to 1000 lucky people will be in the ground tonight as Kingsholm becomes the second crowd pilot match in England after the Stoop hosted fans for a Gallagher Premiership match earlier in September.So everyone will be hoping they can put on a show. Jet-heeled Louis Rees-Zammit starts at full-back for the Cherry and Whites, with Ollie Thorley and Jonny May making up an exciting back-three. The Glaws faithful will also hope Stephen Varney can continue his form from nine. He lines up alongside playmaker Danny Cipriani.On the bench, big Pumas lock Matias Alemanno could make his debut.There are some Springbok-themed headlines for Quins. Bok lock Stephan Lewies skippers the side, 13-cap prop Wilco Louw could make his debut if he comes off the bench, and centre Andre Esterhuizen could make his second appearance, having got his first run-out las week.England wing Chris Ashton will reach 150 Premiership appearances if he makes it onto the park too.Gloucester: Louis Rees-Zammit; Ollie Thorley, Chris Harris, Mark Atkinson, Jonny May; Danny Cipriani, Stephen Varney; Val Rapava-Ruskin, Franco Marais, Jack Stanley, Ed Slater, Matt Garvey, Jack Clement, Lewis Ludlow (captain), Jake Polledri.Replacements: Henry Walker, Corne Fourie, Fraser Balmain, Matias Alemanno, Jordy Reid, Joe Simpson, Lloyd Evans, Billy Twelvetrees.Harlequins: Mike Brown; Cadan Murley, Joe Marchant, Luke Northmore, Aaron Morris; Marcus Smith, Danny Care; Santiago Garcia Botta, Joe Gray, Will Collier, Stephan Lewies (captain), Glen Young, James Chisholm, Will Evans, Alex Dombrandt.Replacements: Scott Baldwin, Marc Thomas, Wilco Louw, Tevita Cavubati, Archie White, Scott Steele, Andre Esterhuizen, Chris Ashton.How to watch Gloucester v Harlequins from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Gloucester v Harlequins, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fans return to Kingsholm for this Premiership encounter Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from the UKGloucester v Harlequins, which kicks off at 7.45pm on Monday, will be shown live on BT Sport 1  in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.That’s great value given they are showing every Premiership match played behind closed doors live and will also be covering the European Champions and Challenge Cup knockout stages in September and October. Plus, you can cancel at any time because there’s no contract. Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Gloucester v Harlequins takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch Gloucester v Harlequins (kick-off 8.45pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Gloucester v Harlequins will kick off at 2.45pm EST and 11.45am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Gloucester v Harlequins live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches and you can watch Gloucester v Harlequins at 4.45am on Tuesday (AEST).The Foxtel Sports HD bundle is $74 a month – and you get 50+ other channels as well as Foxtel GO so you can watch when on the move.Foxtel Sports HD bundle All in: Lewis Ludlow is tackled by Danny Care (Getty Images) last_img read more

Premiership semi-final Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgPlus all the team news ahead of the showdown at the Ricoh Arena Premiership semi-final Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch the Premiership match online from anywhereIt’s into the big time now. Which one of these exciting outfits can make it to the Gallagher Premiership final?It’s Wasps’ fourth Premiership semi-final in the last five years and they come in to it with key figures Joe Launchbury and Jack Willis back to face Bristol. And Jack’s younger brother Tom features on the bench too. In-form scrum-half Dan Robson will hope to lead the way against exciting young ten, Jacob Umaga.There will be no return for former Wasps star Charles Piutau though – the Bears playmaker has an Achilles injury. His brother Siale starts at 12, while Max Malins comes in at full-back. That leaves room for Callum Sheedy to play ten (alongside half-back partner Andy Uren), and captain Steve Luatua and No 8 Nathan Hughes join the pack.Wasps: Matteo Minozzi; Zach Kibirige, Malakai Fekitoa, Jimmy Gopperth, Josh Bassett; Jacob Umaga, Dan Robson; Simon McIntyre, Tommy Taylor, Kieran Brookes, Joe Launchbury (captain), Will Rowlands, Jack Willis, Thomas Young, Brad Shields.Replacements: Gabriel Oghre, Tom West, Biyi Alo, James Gaskell, Alfie Barbeary, Tom Willis, Ben Vellacott, Michael Le Bourgeois.Bristol Bears: Max Malins; Luke Morahan, Semi Radradra, Siale Piutau, Piers O’Conor; Callum Sheedy, Andy Uren; Jake Woolmore, Harry Thacker, John Afoa, Joe Joyce, Chris Vui, Steve Luatua (captain), Ben Earl, Nathan Hughes.Replacements: George Kloska, Yann Thomas, Kyle Sinckler, Ed Holmes, Dan Thomas, Harry Randall, Sam Bedlow, Alapati Leiua.If that whets your appetite, here’s all the ways you can stream Wasps v Bristol online…How to watch Wasps v Bristol from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Wasps v Bristol, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNWasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from the UKWasps v Bristol, which kicks off at 1.30pm on Saturday 10 October, will be shown live on BT Sport 1 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.That’s great value given they are showing every Premiership match played behind closed doors live and will also be covering the European Champions and Challenge Cup knockout stages in September and October. Plus, you can cancel at any time because there’s no contract. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In the thick of it: Wasps star Jimmy Gopperth (Getty Images) center_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Wasps v Bristol takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch Wasps v Bristol (kick-off 2.30pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Wasps v Bristol will kick off at 8.30am and 5.30am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Wasps v Bristol from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 1.30am on Sunday on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerWasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Wasps v Bristol kicks off at 2.30pm on SuperSport Variety 3.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Wasps v Bristol live stream: How to watch from JapanDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Wasps v Bristol in Japan (kick-off 9.30pm). The service is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Find out more about DAZN hereWe recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. last_img read more

Reference panel recommends conciliation with 9 bishops

first_img Submit a Press Release John Kelly says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Christopher Cleveland says: Thomas Andrew says: October 25, 2012 at 10:01 pm Once again the Episcopal Church fails to demonstrate that it is not a clownish farce. Rector Tampa, FL October 26, 2012 at 1:28 pm I expect the Episcopal Church to demonstrate truthfulness……….not a kangaroo court………… Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab October 26, 2012 at 5:29 pm Discipline includes canon laws. They did not simply hold differing views, they interferred in a court case in which the Episcopal Church was a party…against the official legal position of this church. They have been accused. Conciliation is an attempt to reach some reconcilation and avoid bringing them to trial in an ecclesiastical court. A. S. Haley says: Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service John Neir says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN October 27, 2012 at 11:43 pm Sadly, the President Bishop is “damned” if she does, or if she doesn’t, by certain individuals…. Comments (23) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs October 28, 2012 at 8:25 pm where does the bible say that about disputes? I believe the Gospel of Matthew even provides a methodology for resolving disputes. See chapter 18. Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Christopher Cleveland says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ October 26, 2012 at 4:29 pm it seems some would prefer we break out the dueling pistols rather than make any attempt to reconcile. come ON, folks! David Harvin says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Christopher Epting says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS October 26, 2012 at 6:12 pm Too little, too late. TEC is a heterodox institution of religion that eats her own. Shame! David Yarbrough says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Michael Richard says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 30, 2012 at 9:07 am Take what ever position you want, but I find it sad that the only time the Episcopal Church makes it into the paper is when we squabble. Our behavior mocks the gospel. The only person who wins is the last one any of us wants to win. Bruce Green says: November 1, 2012 at 9:20 pm I find myself asking a strange question: Can one be reconciled with someone who has no interest in being reconciled? Do these bishops want to be reconciled? This reminds me of some horrible marriage counseling sessions when one of the parties has already gotten a lawyer. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Daniel Berry, NYC says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC October 26, 2012 at 5:32 pm Actually, “expressing personal opinion on an issue” is exactly what this is not. In both complaints, the bishops charged entered into legal action against those in the Episcopal Church. When they were merely expressing their opinions–as they have done, for years–they were within their rights. For any bishop to participate in legal action against the church violates their ordination vows and cannot go unchallenged. October 26, 2012 at 5:03 pm The Presiding Bishop did what she is supposed to do…uphold the Canons of the Church. Owanah Anderson says: center_img Daniel Berry, NYC says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 26, 2012 at 1:15 pm Aye, to Bishop Epting. As a lay person who lost her home parish near four years ago due to greed of dissidents, I would expect all bishops to either uphold the Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church or to quietly depart – without attempting to take the property – as did Jeffrey N. Steenson. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA David Yarbrough says: October 26, 2012 at 9:10 am No, once again, The Episcopal Church demonstrates that it expects bishops to keep their ordination vows. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 28, 2012 at 8:13 pm As far as I can remember, the New Testament gives one job description for the church, verbalized by Paul: “We have been entrusted with the ministry of reconciliation.”You can certainly call that clownish if you like Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group John Kirk says: October 26, 2012 at 8:22 pm Moputo Jones,Twelve (12) communicants, who represent less than 300 communicants out of 29,000 communicants in the Diocese of SC, brought these charges against Bishop Lawrence. Those three hundred are .01 % of the total members of the Diocese of SC. What does that percentage tell you about Bishop Lawrence? It tells me that 99.99 percent of the Diocese of SC supports Bishop Lawrence. I would say that one tenth of one percent does not constitute a diocese that is unhappy with their Bishop, but the exact opposite. Tom Downs says: October 26, 2012 at 4:33 pm Ms. Anderson, your pain speaks to the unnecessary collateral damage caused by this entire process. While I’m sorry for your pain, I note that the Episcopal Church has, in large measure, left the so-called “dissidents” rather than the other way around, and the “greed” you mention isn’t limited to the “dissidents”.If over 90% of a parish votes to leave, being forced to leave the property and endowments behind is a hardship to them, as well as to the remnant who are forced to maintain buildings and ministries beyond the capability of the smaller group – in both cases working against the ability to continue and grow the ministries which are the reason for the Church in the first place. While there have been exceptions in which the remnant grew sufficiently to stay viable, this is far from universal.The Presbyterian Church USA is taking a more enlightened and conciliatory approach, working toward offering conservative congregations the opportunity to leave PCUSA and join other Presbyterian denominations more in line with their theology, and doing so in a structured way, “decently and in order”. Perhaps it’s time for ECUSA to evaluate this possibility. October 27, 2012 at 1:10 am Tom Downs, “discipline” most certainly includes obedience to canon law, but you will search the canons in vain to find any provision that allows the Presiding Bishop, or anyone else in the Church, to speak by themselves what you call “the official legal position of this church” in secular courts. General Convention has no authority to interpret the Constitution and Canons, and the Presiding Bishop has still less. Moreover, Canon IV.19.2 prohibits any member of the Church, “whether lay or ordained,” from seeking “to have the Constitution and Canons of the Church interpreted by a secular court,” or to “resort to a secular court to address a dispute arising under the Constituttion and Canons …”.So why does the Presiding Bishop get to speak her views of the Constitution and Canons in court, but not other bishops in the Church? The truth is that the Presiding Bishop is making up that so-called “official position” out of whole cloth, and is letting her own personal Chancellor run wild with litigation — all to his personal benefit.This is a disgrace which would not be tolerated in any public corporation or charity — so why should we Episcopalians accept it in our own Church? Reference panel recommends conciliation with 9 bishops Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing October 26, 2012 at 4:24 pm The ordinary for a Bishop includes faithfulness to the discipline and doctrine of the Church but does NOT include unconditional acquiescence to the Presiding Bishop, who is merely primus inter pares (if even that).These Bishops are under fire for expressing personal opinion on an issue before civil courts – where the Bible says disputes between Christians should NEVER have been taken in the first place. Daniel Berry, NYC says: Rector Belleville, IL Moputo Jones says: [Episcopal News Service] An Episcopal Church reference panel has apparently recommended seeking “conciliation” with nine bishops (five active and four retired) after two complaints were filed earlier this year about their involvement in property litigation in two dioceses.According to information circulating on some blogs, the reference panel unanimously decided that the complaints would proceed with conciliation pursuant to Canon IV.10 of the Episcopal Church’s Constitution and Canons.Conciliation, according to the canon, calls for seeking a resolution “which promotes healing, repentance, forgiveness, restitution, justice, amendment of life and reconciliation among the complainant, respondent, affected community, other persons and the church.”A conciliator will be appointed to assist in the process towards reconciliation. That person, according to the canon, should be skilled in dispute resolution techniques and without conflict of interest in the matter.“If conciliation cannot be achieved within a reasonable time, the matter will be referred back to the reference panel,” the canon states.Episcopal Church Public Affairs Officer Neva Rae Fox told ENS that the information about the reference panel’s recommendation is based on private letters that Bishop Clay Matthews, who heads the church’s Office of Pastoral Development, sent to the nine bishops.“As with similar letters, they are considered private and, therefore, we will not be making them public,” she said.Matthews also serves as the “intake officer,” the person designated to receive complaints alleging offense and refer them for further action or investigation if necessary. Matthews was appointed to that role by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.The complaints against the nine bishops surfaced in June.In one instance, the complaint concerns the fact that seven bishops endorsed an amicus curiae or “friend of the court” brief prepared by the Anglican Communion Institute, Inc. in the pending appeal of a court ruling involving the Diocese of Fort Worth and the bishop, clergy and laity who broke away from that diocese in November 2008.The brief objects to the trial court’s ruling that told the dissidents to return “all property, as well as control of the diocesan corporation” to the Episcopal leaders of the diocese.Those named in the Fort Worth complaint are retired Diocese of Texas Bishop Maurice M. Benitez, retired Diocese of Central Florida Bishop John W. Howe, Diocese of Dallas Bishop Suffragan Paul E. Lambert, Diocese of Albany Bishop William H. Love, Diocese of Western Louisiana Bishop D. Bruce MacPherson, Diocese of Springfield Bishop Daniel H. Martins, and Diocese of Dallas Bishop James M. Stanton.MacPherson is also named in the other complaint, along with retired Diocese of South Carolina Bishop Edward L. Salmon, Jr. and retired Diocese of Springfield Bishop Peter H. Beckwith. Matthews e-mailed them to say that a complaint has been received against them because they signed affidavits opposing to a motion for summary judgment made by representatives of the Diocese of Quincy and the Episcopal Church in the fall of 2011 to secure diocesan financial assets from a group that broke from the diocese in November 2008.The motion for summary judgment in that case was rejected in December 2011 and the case is due to go to trial in April 2013.As per canons, the reference panel is composed of the intake officer, the presiding bishop and the president of the Disciplinary Board of the House of Bishops (IV.2). The reference panel is charged with the duty of reviewing information to determine how to refer the matter (IV. 6.sec. (8)). The referral options are (a) no action is required other than appropriate pastoral response pursuant to Canon IV.8; (b) conciliation pursuant to IV.10; (c) investigation pursuant to IV.11; or referral for possible agreement regarding terms of discipline pursuant to IV.9. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. October 26, 2012 at 4:37 pm This is not between Bp. Lawrence and the Presiding Bishop. This issue is between Bp. Lawrence and the members of his own diocese that brought a complaint against him. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Michael Smith says: Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Fr. Michael Neal says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ By ENS staffPosted Oct 25, 2012 October 29, 2012 at 7:36 pm Dear Bishop Benitez! He confirmed me twenty-eight years ago at Saint Alban’s, Waco. He’s a grand old man. May God give him and the other nine bishops every grace needed to stand firm against the patent silliness that’s swirling about them. They aren’t the ones in need of reconciliation. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY ClayOla Gitane says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL October 28, 2012 at 8:16 pm Mr Yarborough, according to Presbyterian polity, officers of the Presbyterian church have no claim on the property of an individual congregation. Things don’t shake down in quite that way in the polity of TEC. thomas mauro says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET November 13, 2012 at 11:46 pm Colossians 2:6-10 (ESV) Therefore, as you received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in him, rooted and built up in him and established in the faith, just as you were taught, abounding in thanksgiving. See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ. For in him the whole fullness of deity dwells bodily, and you have been filled in him, who is the head of all rule and authority.Father in heaven, We give You thanks that Christ transcends all dimensions and realms, seen and unseen. We pray that each of the ten bishops found guilty by TEC’s disciplinary apparatus will walk in Jesus, rooted and built up in Him. Christ Jesus is the head of all rule and authority, all principality and power. At the name of Jesus, every principality, power, ruler of the darkness of this world, and spiritual wickedness in high places must bow its knee. Christ before the bishops, Christ behind them, Christ to their right, Christ to their left, Christ above them, and Christ beneath them. Christ over their time. Christ! Christ! Christ for Mark, Peter, Maurice, John, Paul, William, Bruce, Daniel, Edward, and James. Amen. October 26, 2012 at 10:03 pm This has nothing to do with Bishop Lawrence. However, making a disciplinary matter out of a difference of opinion about legal matters–however wrong they may be– is ridiculous. I doubt seriously that ordination deprives one of their First Amendment rights to express their opinions about matters in the secular courts. These complaints should have been dismissed on their face. And that is true even though ECUSA and the respective dioceses should win the cases in question.last_img read more

Care and compassion for military families, veterans

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls By Pat McCaughanPosted Nov 11, 2013 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Comments (1) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK November 11, 2013 at 10:06 pm How Timely and Appreciated these veteran testimonials on this Veterans Day! Thank you so much to All for sharing these heartrending personal stories and experiences, and how our four-legged friends,i.e. dog companions are/have become so significant to lives, and life itself. Yes, we need to learn and share more and more of the consequences for so many young people fighting the seemingly endless wars, and the terrible impact on their lives and the destruction of lives in these wars! Indeed through learning as in this ENS article we can also take pro-active action on behalf of our citizenry and all humankind to contact our legislators/congressional reps for increased focus on diplomacy and peace in this world. Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC A couple walks through some of the two thousand and thirteen United States flags, that are part of the Aurora Healing Fields to honor veterans, during Veterans Day weekend in Aurora, Illinois November 10, 2013. Veterans Day is observed on November 11. Photo: REUTERS/Jeff Haynes[Episcopal News Service] Without his service dog Sparta, Allan Engvall says he’d be cowering inside his Antelope, California home with the doors locked, the blinds drawn, the burglar alarm on, afraid to venture outside even in the daytime.“I would never go out in public. With crowds, or sitting in traffic, I’d get the feeling of being trapped, that I’d get ambushed,” said Engvall, 28, who served multiple U.S. Army deployments in Iraq. Discharged in 2007, he returned with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury after encounters with improvised explosive devices (IEDs).“You definitely have a feeling of being outcast, like you don’t belong,” Engvall told ENS about transitioning to civilian life. “You get an empty feeling because the buddies you’ve served beside for the last 18 months are nowhere to be found. There, you do what you have to in order to stay alive, but you come home and your brain doesn’t click, you’re still in fight mode but you don’t have your gun.”Allan Engvall, with his service dog Sparta. Photo courtesy of Terry SandhoffBut two-year-old Sparta, an 80-pound Husky malamute mix “does crowd control” by placing himself between Engvall and others. “He watches my back,” Engvall said.“When I start fidgeting, he’ll put his paw on me and I know my leg’s shaking, my hands are twitching, my anxiety’s getting up, so I can go outside and take a breath before I have a panic attack and make a scene,” he said.Sparta has made it possible for him to drive, to join public gatherings, visit restaurants and attend support groups at St. Clement’s Episcopal Church, in Rancho Cordova, California, led by parishioner and dog trainer Terry Sandhoff.A “veteran-friendly” congregation, St. Clement’s support groups are among a growing number of efforts by Episcopal churches to embrace and encourage active military personnel, their families and veterans.Honoring veterans healing; becoming ‘military friendly’Episcopal Church Bishop Suffragan for Federal Ministries Jay Magness said yearly Veterans Day observances – like the Nov. 8 Washington National Cathedral prayer breakfast and a Nov. 10 program at Church of the Epiphany in Washington, D.C. – help to focus faith communities on veterans issues, but also encourage ongoing efforts.Magness said that more soldiers are surviving battlefield injuries than ever before – but the catastrophic nature of those injuries complicates physical, emotional and spiritual recovery. About 385,000, roughly one-third of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, have been diagnosed with war-related mental disabilities. Estimates of homeless veterans are at about 62,000 nationally.Many veterans also need “moral repair of soul injury,” he said. “When people engage in war and combat, and I say this as a combat veteran myself from Viet Nam, things happen,” said Magness, a U.S. Navy veteran. “Things happen to you that go beyond the physical and emotional self. A young man or woman doesn’t engage in combat activities – the things you see, the things you smell, the things you hear and the things you do – without some potential for moral injury. This is the church’s business,” he said.The Very Rev. Gary Hall, dean of the National Cathedral, agreed. Since the Episcopal Church has always embraced both pacifists and military chaplains, “honoring veterans is something everybody can agree upon,” he said.The Rev. Babs Meairs, a retired U.S. Marine Corps and former Veterans Administration chaplain, said the Diocese of San Diego has created a “tool kit” to assist congregational support of veterans.It includes: becoming “military friendly,” Meairs said, “praying for them and supporting events that honor them, reaching out to their families, being aware of the stresses of military expectations, making informed referrals when appropriate, and listening without condemning.”Churches support active military, help veterans begin againFrom New York to California, Florida to Illinois, Episcopal churches are sending “care” packages, adopting military units, and offering safe places and spaces to heal, to live and to pray – for active military and their families as well as for returning veterans.In Avon, New York, Corrie Krzemien said members of Zion Episcopal Church helped love her into healing while Zion House, the converted church rectory next door, put a roof over her head.Zion House is one of the nation’s first transitional residences for homeless female veterans, said the Rev. Kelly Ayer, a U.S. Army veteran, and the church rector and director of the residential program. Since 2010, Zion House has served 35 women, most of whom suffer from PTSD, military sexual trauma and other deployment-related injuries.“My life fell apart,” said Krzemien, 53, who served on active U.S. Army duty from 1982-1985, and is still unable to talk about her military experiences. A year ago, she moved to Zion House and has become a sales representative for Boadicea, its soaps, lotions and spa product line, made of goat’s milk, which helps to support residents.“It gives me an opportunity to be able to work again, even though I’m highly disabled mentally, and physically at times, but I keep it moving,” she said. “Mother Kelly and the people in the congregation, they just want to love on you, and that’s cool.”Sending ‘care packages’ and careSending regular “care packages” has created lots of love between active military and faith communities like St. Peter the Fisherman Episcopal Church in New Smyrna, Florida, and Trinity Church in Tariffville, Connecticut.Jackie Sturgeon, 76, said St. Peter’s efforts began with sending off batches of homemade cookies to family and friends of church members but grew into more personal items, candies, toiletries, books, and CDs as well as food “to everyone. They don’t have to be Episcopalian, they just have to be serving the country.”She keeps a notebook filled with messages from appreciative servicemen and women stationed throughout the world, including one from her granddaughter, Missy Lund, who enlisted in the U.S. Navy after high school in 2002 at 17 years of age.The St. Pete’s packages “were awesome. They just always seemed to come at the time you most needed them,” said Lund, in a recent telephone interview with ENS. She was stationed in Italy, Africa, Florida and Washington State before she left the military in 2009.“When I was deployed, I didn’t call home that much. But always included in the packages were words of wisdom that I needed to hear,” recalled Lund, now 29 and in Florida, awaiting transfer to Virginia with her husband Nick, who just returned from Afghanistan. The packages made homecomings all the more meaningful, she said, “because I’d come back to visit the church and meet all these people who knew me and who prayed for me, but who I didn’t know.”For John Bald, 75, a “pre-Viet Nam veteran” supporting the troops was a labor of love and a matter of faith, especially after he heard that veteran suicide rates are approaching nearly 22 per day in the United States. He formed a committee at his church, Trinity in Tariffville, and began sending care packages and connecting with local veterans groups.“Less than one percent of our population is fighting these wars and many of them have been back four and five times,” he said during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “When I found out what a tough time they were having when they got home, suffering from PTSD, which is a very normal reaction to the terrible stress and things they’ve seen and some of the things they’ve had to do, I said that, as a Christian I cannot and will not let this happen,” he said.The church has since “adopted” the 344th MP Company in Afghanistan. “Half are members from Connecticut and half from Massachusetts,” he said. “We send them items. We pray for them and their families, and that’s the next step, to get involved with their families and help them.”Special liturgies, special weekends, faithful witnessThe Rev. Marian Phipps of St. Hugh of Lincoln Episcopal Church in Elgin, Illinois, said she was moved to create twice-monthly special worship services for military families in 2010 after talking to a military mom, whose three sons deployed at the same time.“She said that every time her dog barked, her heart sank,” Phipps recalled. “She was afraid to look up to see who was coming up her driveway, because she was always expecting a uniformed person, coming to tell her something had happened to one of them.“It made me aware of the realities military families live with, while the rest of us go about our days and kind of forget we were in a war,” Phipps said. “But, they can’t. God moved my heart.”The bi-monthly services are held second Tuesdays and fourth Wednesdays and although “there hasn’t been a huge turnout, I got a note once from a mom of a marine who said she was glad to know we’re praying, and keeping a faithful witness,” Phipps said.Offering faithful witness is huge and “such a simple thing to do,” she added. “It doesn’t matter about the politics of war. People are in harm’s way and we can pray for peace and for people to be protected, and we do. My vision would be, any given night, if there was a distraught military family person who wanted to pray, there’d be a church in a town where they could pray.”Similarly, awareness of veterans’ challenges moved David Rosenberg to create Soldier Care,” R&R getaway weekends for disabled veterans through St. Michael’s Church in Studio City in the Diocese of Los Angeles.About nine years ago, Rosenberg’s encounter with a disabled veteran raised his awareness of their challenges. The television writer appealed to friends and strangers alike, local entertainment venues, hotel and restaurant owners, to arrange for donations of studio tours, Dodger baseball games, and other amenities on a shoestring budget.Through local military hospital referrals he arranges for veterans to “come for the weekend and we build up trust.”But it doesn’t end there. “We learn who needs what, and how we can walk the path with them from that point forward,” said Rosenberg, 57. “It’s a safe environment for them to let their hair down, just a people-to-people ministry reaching out, one on one.”Welcoming returning soldiers, “saying thank you for your service requires an action,” he added. “Anybody can do it. I just entered it on a personal level and folks showed up to help make it happen. These guys need it. They’ve been deployed two and three times, so they’ve seen three times the amount of death and loss of friends. There’s a lot they don’t talk about and people are struggling.”Parishioner and dog trainer Terry Sandhoff of St. Clement’s, Rancho Cordova, has witnessed many of those struggles. But she’s also witnessed “more miracles in a month than most people see in a lifetime.”Through her work as a dog trainer at the Gabby Jack Ranch and her facilitation of the church’s veterans support groups she has seen first-time visitors “with that thousand yard stare and pretty much checked out” who arrive feeling isolated and alone but gradually connect, first with the dogs, then with other dog owners and make friends.“They go on field trips together, it builds a support system for them,” she said.The other challenge is to educate congregations and the wider community about how to help, say both Sandhoff, and the Rev. Christine Leigh-Taylor, St. Clement’s rector. Becoming a designated “military friendly” congregation through Care for the Troops meant, among other things, rearranging the church’s movable chairs along a back wall, so “veterans, especially those with PTSD, could sit within sight of an exit,” she said.Jerry Padgett with his service dog Bayley. Photo courtesy of Terry SandhoffFor Jerry Padgett, 38, attending St. Clement’s worship and support groups along with Bayley, his black and white “Jersey-cow colored” Labradoodle, has helped to save his life in more ways than one, he said.“They forced me, in a good way, to get up, to talk about my injuries, even though I didn’t want to,” said Padgett, of Rancho Cordova. He sustained multiple injuries when a booby-trapped two-story building collapsed on him during a U.S. Navy rescue mission in Iraq. He suffers from PTSD, traumatic brain injury, neural neuropathy, seizure disorder, neck, leg, back and other injuries. On good days, he can get by with the assistance of a cane; other days, he uses a walker.But Bayley and the support groups give him hope, he said. “Taking her for a walk turned into two walks a day and, from two walks to three.“It is something so small, but so giant for a veteran who wants to find every reason to alienate ourselves. Having Bayley has given me freedom, a more compassionate heart,” he said. “I’m going to try to do a marathon, with my walker. Because of it, I am counting on less pain episodes, and fits of rage or fits of crying.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Dr. Erna Lund says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Care and compassion for military families, veterans Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Alan M. Gates elected as bishop of Massachusetts

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Mark Hatch says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA House of Bishops, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group John Zachritz says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 7, 2014 at 4:27 pm Congratulations, Alan. We met last Fall while my wife and I were housesitting for relatives in Shaker. We loved your parish, and heard from more than one parishioner how nervous they were that you had been nominated for Bp. of Massachusetts. God bless them, and God bless you and the Diocese of Massachusetts. Alan M. Gates elected as bishop of Massachusetts Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing By Tracy SukrawPosted Apr 7, 2014 People Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Elections, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release April 15, 2014 at 8:07 am All the best and god’s grace be with you Alan. Welcome home. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Comments (3) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts] The people of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts have elected an Ohio parish priest to be their next bishop.At the special electing convention held on Saturday, April 5, clergy and lay delegates elected the Rev. Alan M. Gates, rector of St. Paul’s Church in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, to succeed the Rt. Rev. M. Thomas Shaw, SSJE as the 16th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. The electing convention took place at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston.In order to be elected, a candidate needed to receive a simple majority of votes from both the clergy and lay delegates, voting separately as “orders,” on the same balloting round. Gates secured election on the fourth ballot, receiving 157 clergy votes and 188 lay votes, with 145 and 164 needed, respectively, for election.There was a delay in the proceedings after the third ballot had been cast because an error was discovered in the first ballot’s lay vote tally. The corrected results for ballot one were posted, and ballots two and three were then deemed invalid. Fourth ballot results and the election were announced at 3:40 p.m.Gates’s election must now receive consent from a majority of the Episcopal Church’s diocesan bishops and a majority of its dioceses. Pending that consent, the bishop-elect’s consecration is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Sept. 13 at the Agganis Arena at Boston University, with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori presiding.“To return to the Diocese of Massachusetts a quarter century after my ordination to the priesthood there will be a genuine delight. To be called to do so as bishop-elect is an unimagined honor and a privilege beyond the telling,” Gates said in a statement following the election. “I am humbled to follow the episcopate of Bishop Tom Shaw who has led the diocese with grace and courage for 20 years.”The other six candidates were:the Rev. Holly Lyman Antolini, rector of St. James’s Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts;the Rev. Timothy E. Crellin, vicar of St. Stephen’s Church in Boston;the Rev. Ronald Culmer, rector of St. Clare’s Church in Pleasanton, California;the Rev. Ledlie Laughlin, rector of St. Peter’s Church in Philadelphia;the Rev. Canon Mally Lloyd, canon to the ordinary in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts; andthe Rev. Sam Rodman, project manager for Campaign Initiatives for the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts.“Alan is a skilled pastor and he has an appreciation for the complexity of the Diocese of Massachusetts. I have real confidence in his ability to lead this diocese forward with creativity and dedication. It will be a pleasure working with him in these next months,” Shaw said following the election.“It was a long day, but it was worth taking that extra procedural time,” Shaw said of the tallying correction made during the balloting process. “I was impressed with people’s desire to make sure everything was in order.”Shaw became the 15th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts in January 1995. In preparation for retirement, he plans to resign his office at the time of the bishop-elect’s consecration in September.The Diocese of Massachusetts, established in 1784, is among the Episcopal Church’s oldest and largest, in terms of baptized membership, and comprises 183 parishes, missions, chapels and chaplaincies in eastern Massachusetts.Gates, 56, has been the rector of St. Paul’s Church in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, since 2004.  He is a graduate of Middlebury College and undertook graduate studies at Georgetown University. He holds a Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1988 and served congregations in the Episcopal dioceses of Massachusetts, Western Massachusetts and Chicago prior to his call to Ohio. He and his spouse, Patricia J. Harvey, live in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and have two children.The bishop-elect’s full statement and biography are available here.  Ted Thomas Martin says: April 10, 2014 at 12:10 pm Well he certainly looks like a bishop, congratulations. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more