49ers ‘Gold Digger Program’ not paying off on defense, yet

first_imgSANTA CLARA — A cleverly named “Gold Digger Program” is meant to reward 49ers defenders for exceptional plays and effort.For example, interceptions, in the rare instances they happen, would count. The daily prize is a gold-colored football emblazoned with defensive coordinator Robert Saleh’s mantras — “All Gas, No Brake” and “Extreme Violence.”The 49ers defenders haven’t lacked effort a week into training camp. But interceptions remain scarce, a replay of last season’s takeaway trauma that …last_img

49ers vs. Falcons: Who wins bragging rights between cousins McGlinchey, Ryan?

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Mike McGlinchey fondly recalls a “friendly” basketball game before his junior year in high school, when, already at 6-foot-8, he dunked on a pro athlete.It was his cousin, Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan. Sorry, no proof a viral-video exits.“That’s kind of the cool thing about it, that it’s just folklore, because there were no cameras,” McGlinchey, the 49ers right tackle, said Wednesday, ahead of facing his cousin and the Falcons on Sunday at Levi’s Stadium.San Francisco …last_img

Now, 2 Chinese nationals fall foul of Bihar liquor law

first_imgTwo Chinese nationals were arrested in Patna after liquor bottles were seized from their rooms in a guest house of the mobile company they have been working with for the past six months. Bihar was declared a dry State from April, 2016 after the new stringent excise and prohibition law was enforced in the State.The two Chinese nationals, W. Chuynagyong and Tiyandong, were taken into custody on Sunday night from a guest house running in a four-storey house located at Ali Nagar area of Anisabad under Gardanibagh police station in Patna. The local police seized three Indian Made Foreign Liquor bottles from two rooms they were living in. Both the Chinese nationals are said to be employees of a Chinese mobile phone company and the guest house was booked in the name of Oppo Mobiles (DS) Private Limited.“One IMFL bottle was seized from room no. 201/B and two bottles from room no. 220/B in which the two Chinese nationals were staying for last six months with others from their country,” said a Gardanibagh police officer. Altogether nine Chinese nationals have been staying in the guest house for past several months and their passports and visas are being verified, the police officer told journalists.Test negativeThe breath analyser test conducted on the accused reported negative but under the new excise and prohibition law even possession of liquor bottles draws stringent punishment. The Chinese embassy has been informed about the arrest of their nationals, the police added. The manager and other employees of the guest house are being questioned by the police.Over 1,27,000 people have been arrested in the State connection with more than 1,05,000 FIRs lodged for prohibition violations so far. “Only 8,123 persons are behind bars for liquor offences,” Chief Minister Nitish Kumar had said on March 12 this year while addressing a function in Patna. Mr. Kumar, however, has hinted at some amendments to the new Bihar Excise and Prohibition Act, 2016 to stop its “misuse”.last_img read more

PEI scraps business immigration program criticized for oversight problems

first_imgCHARLOTTETOWN – Prince Edward Island is scrapping a controversial business immigration program which prompted federal investigations alleging hundreds of applicants never settled on the Island.The provincial government said Wednesday it will no longer accept applications from immigrants looking to set up a business on the Island in the entrepreneur stream of the Provincial Nominee Program.The immigration program has faced criticism for granting permanent residency status — a coveted step towards full citizenship — before businesses were set up and people actually moved to P.E.I.Under the program, the applicants provide the Island government with a $200,000 refundable deposit, and commit to invest $150,000 and manage a firm.A spokesman for the Office of Immigration says in 2016-17 over half of all the 269 applicants who had “completed their agreements” forfeited their deposit and never opened a business, raising $18 million for the small province.In addition, last year The Canadian Press reported on how three international students were asked by owners of businesses created under the program to return a portion of their wages to the business immigrants. In one case, a student said he was fired when he refused, and in two other cases, the students said they agreed to give back a portion of their income in cash.Progressive Conservative Leader James Aylward said Wednesday the program bred public distrust and should have been cancelled years ago.“It never passed the sniff test,” he said in an interview.“Our retention rate was dismal … The government raked tens of millions of dollars from defaulted deposits.”The province had said it was conducting a review into the program, shortly after a series of investigations by the Canada Border Services Agency became public.The Canadian Press also recently reported on a search warrant application by the agency that alleged hundreds of people gained permanent residency in Canada by using local addresses where they didn’t live, using the PNP entrepreneur stream.An investigator alleged 462 applicants to the provincial nominee program used Charlottetown homes belonging to two Chinese immigrants over the past four years as “addresses of convenience.”The investigator also said she suspected the immigrants didn’t come to the Island and settle, contrary to the requirements of the provincial program.Those allegations, which have not been proven in court, came two months after two Charlottetown hoteliers were charged with aiding in immigration fraud, with the CBSA alleging 566 immigrants used the addresses of the siblings’ hotel and home.The siblings have pleaded not guilty to immigration fraud charges, and their lawyer, Lee Cohen, has said there will be discussion with prosecutors about the sworn statements provided by the two accused.Cohen says he’s suggested “the possibility that the statements were not voluntarily given” in the case.Chris Palmer, the province’s minister of Economic Development, said in an interview that he wasn’t forced by the federal government to shut down the program, despite the high-profile investigations.“The feds didn’t intervene and tell us to do this, no,” he said.Rather, he said it was due to his department’s disappointment with its results in retaining immigrants on the Island.“We weren’t satisfied with it as our rates of retention weren’t as high as we wanted them to be,” he said.However, Richard Kurland, an immigration lawyer based in Vancouver, said he sees a relationship between Ottawa’s probes and the shutdown of the program.“Trials involving the P.E.I. program start soon, so no surprise to see the P.E.I. government shutting down the program before all is revealed,” he wrote in an email.Kurland has long argued the Island’s system should mirror British Columbia’s program, which approves a business project first, makes the person spend two years on a work permit to ensure business success, and then requires the applicant to live near the business at least nine months a year.“Only after that is done and the business is successful will the province hand over a ‘nomination certificate’ that lets the person apply for a permanent resident visa,” he wrote.“P.E.I. had it backwards, handing over the ‘nomination certificate’ first. That’s not the way to go and the … design flaw gave rise to a lot of problems.”“Keep the candy until the person lives up to their promises.”The province is noting that the entrepreneur stream is only a small part of the total number of immigrants it nominates.It will continue to have a program where it nominates immigrants for work permits, where they will only be granted permanent residency if they fulfil their commitments to set up a business.It will also continue to nominate immigrants who fill the province’s labour needs.The number of nominations accepted under the nominee stream currently totals about 150 people, which is about 15 per cent of the roughly 1,070 provincially sponsored immigrants expected to be nominated this year.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.— By Michael Tutton in Halifax.last_img read more

Mayor Faulconer appoints San Diego FireRescue Veteran as new Fire Chief

first_img Posted: July 11, 2018 July 11, 2018 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – After a three-month national search, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer today announced the appointment of Heartland Fire & Rescue Chief Colin Stowell as the next chief of the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department (SDFD).Stowell began his firefighting career at SDFD in 1988 and served in every rank in the department, including Assistant Chief, before leaving in 2016 to lead Heartland Fire.Stowell, who was strongly recommended by both the community and professional interview panels, brings a wide-range of experience that will benefit the department and its more than 1,200 firefighters, lifeguards and support staff.“Chief Stowell was born and raised here in San Diego and spent the majority of his firefighting career protecting our neighborhoods and our residents,” Mayor Faulconer said. “He has the right experience at the right time to continue the major investments we’re making in public safety and lead this department into the future. It’s great to bring Chief Stowell back to SDFD where it all started.”Chief Stowell will take over the department following recent significant investments made by Mayor Faulconer and the City Council, including new firefighting helicopters and the construction or renovation of nine fire stations over the last three years.As San Diego’s Assistant Fire Chief, Chief Stowell oversaw the Emergency Operations division, which includes 48 fire stations, lifeguard services, the training division, emergency medical services, and special operations comprising hazardous materials, air operations, the bomb squad, and fire investigations. He led more than 845 sworn personnel and 240 full-time or seasonal lifeguards.“My career in the fire service began as a member of this great organization. There is no higher honor, personally or professionally, than to have the opportunity to build on this history by leading this esteemed department and its dedicated members in the coming years,” Stowell said. “As Fire Chief, I recognize the critical importance of continuing to provide compassionate and professional emergency services that distinguish this department, and ones that citizens and visitors to our city both deserve and expect. Fortunately, the city leaders and elected officials are tremendous advocates of the fire service in San Diego, and I feel extremely optimistic moving forward with such support and shared commitment to these priorities.”Chief Stowell previously held leadership roles in the SDFD’s operations and emergency medical services divisions. As a Captain, he served as the department’s Wellness Officer and developed the initial concept and procedures for SDFD’s regional Wellness Program. As a Deputy Chief and Assistant Fire Chief, he served on the San Diego All-Hazards Incident Management team as Incident Commander and Operations Section Chief.“Colin Stowell is lauded by his peers, and respected by other fire agencies,” said City Councilmember Chris Cate, Chair of the Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods committee. “I’m excited for what will come under Colin’s leadership.”Chief Stowell spent the past few years as chief of Heartland Fire & Rescue, which serves the cities of El Cajon, La Mesa and Lemon Grove. There he has been responsible for management and oversight of 127 sworn and civilian fire department staff, policy administration, development of four separate operating budgets as well as capital improvement projects, contract negotiations and oversight, and emergency management coordination with other city departments.“I am pleased to welcome Chief Colin Stowell back to the City of San Diego. We are fortunate to have such an experienced and capable manager for our Fire-Rescue Department,” said City Councilmember Lorie Zapf. “I look forward working with Chief Stowell to deliver the best public safety services to the residents of San Diego.”Feedback from community and professional panels were important factors in Mayor Faulconer’s ultimate decision to appoint Chief Stowell.Community and professional officials who participated in the interview process were:Dimitrios Alexiou, Hospital Association of San Diego CountyRonald Cho, Park and Recreation BoardGeorge Durado, San Diego City Firefighters Association Local 145Jim Geering, Chula Vista Fire ChiefStephen Groce, Human Relations CommissionSusan Jester, Citizens Equal Opportunity CommissionRick Robinson, Oceanside Fire ChiefWendy Robinson, San Diego Fire-Rescue FoundationChris Vanos, Teamsters 911Nick Wright, Municipal Employees Association.Chief Stowell will succeed Kevin Ester, who has served as Interim Chief since April when former Chief Brian Fennessy left the department for a similar position in Orange County. Ester will remain in a leadership role within SDFD.The City Council is expected to hold Stowell’s confirmation hearing later this month.Chief Stowell earned his Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration from San Diego State University, holds an associate’s degree in fire science from Miramar College and completed the Executive Fire Officer Program at the National Fire Academy. He is a native San Diegan who lives in San Diego with his wife and two teenage children. Mayor Faulconer appoints San Diego Fire-Rescue Veteran as new Fire Chief KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Chula Vista residents win battle over new car wash

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – 82 year old Judy Wilson has lived in her home in Chula Vista for 45 years, calling it her peaceful sanctuary.For years now there have been talks about building a car wash right beneath her home, 43 feet away from her back fence.It might look like an empty parking lot right now, but the plan calls for a 2,400 square foot building with an 85 foot long car wash tunnel. That includes 12 vacuum stations in the parking lot.“The noise coming out of that is like an airplane revving up at Lindbergh Field it is so loud” says Wilson.She’s concerned about the noise, the traffic and most importantly her health, because she’s toxic sensitive. There used to be a gas station here and she says it could have contaminated the soil beneath it.“When I get hit with something like that, it closes up my throat, I can barely breathe, I ache in every part of my body and I just can’t function right.”Neil Capin, the owner of the proposed car wash, says he’s gone above and beyond to address these concerns. He’s willing to install a sound wall up, add vegetation and landscaping to soften the noise, and even open an hour later every day.City leaders gave the car wash a stamp of approval but challenges and appeals quickly followed. Tonight Chula Vista City Council voted 4-1 against the car wash’s construction. January 22, 2019 Chula Vista residents win battle over new car wash , center_img Posted: January 22, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Federal employees set up 1000 GoFundMe pages amid government shutdown

first_imgThe government shut down since December 2018.  Pool Federal workers have begun asking for help on GoFundMe as a government shutdown nears the three-week mark.Government employees have set up roughly 1,000 fundraising pages as they seek help in meeting their expenses, said a GoFundMe spokeswoman in an email statement. Campaigns on the crowdfunding platform seek anywhere from a few hundred to thousands of dollars for everyday expenses, such as utilities and groceries.”We deploy proprietary technical tools and have multiple processes in place to verify the identity of campaign organizers and the beneficiary of the campaign,” said the spokeswoman. “Before money is transferred, an individual’s information, including their banking information, must be verified by our payment processor.”A search on the site for the term “government shutdown” returned more than 1,650 results. The campaigns have raised approximately $150,000 in total, according to the platform’s spokeswoman.”It’s affecting over hundreds of thousands of federal employees across the US in different federal agencies,” Brandon Taijeron, a Department of Justice employee whose story was included in The Guardian article, wrote on his GoFundMe page. “I’m on my last leg as far as finances being taken care of, putting food on the table, making sure my wife and son have everything they need, getting to and from work even though we’re not getting paid right now.”The government shutdown started in December because the House and Senate couldn’t come to agreement on funding President Donald Trump’s $5 billion border wall, according to CBS News. Over 420,000 government staff are reportedly working without pay.First published on Jan. 10, 5:50 p.m. PT.Updates on Jan. 11, 7:20 a.m. PT: Adds GoFundMe spokeswoman statement.  Politics Digital Media Internet Services 30 Commentscenter_img Share your voice Tagslast_img read more

Brave browsers grand plan will pay you to view privacyrespecting ads

first_img Share your voice Laptops Software Internet Internet Services Blockchain Advertising Brave browser Privacy Cryptocurrency Comments Tags The Brave web browser will let you sign up to see a handful of ads each day and, for a while, keep the lion’s share of their revenue. Brave What if online ads weren’t the distracting, privacy-invading, malware-laced, battery-gobbling mess they’ve become? What if they could even fund worthy websites?That’s what startup Brave hopes to accomplish with a major new phase of its browser business. Brave began its existence three years ago by blocking all ads by default. On Tuesday, it’ll start offering anyone using the developer version of Brave the option of seeing privacy-respecting ads. And, in a few weeks, when Brave 1.0 arrives on personal computers, Brave will give those users 70 percent of the ad revenue.”We think we can make advertising great,” Brave co-founder and Chief Executive Brendan Eich said in an exclusive interview with CNET about the new phase of the company’s business.It’s a tall order. A respectable 5.5 million people use Brave each month, but that’s a tiny fraction of the billion-plus who use the dominant web browser, Google’s Chrome. To be successful, Brave will not only have to attract a lot more people to use its browser and to embrace its ads, it’ll also have to convince partners in the advertising and publishing industries that the complications of the technology are worth it. Advertisers are expected to spend $132.32 billion on US digital ads this year, according to tracking firm eMarketer. It’s a vast, entrenched industry.Plenty of online companies — Facebook and Google to name two — have offered consumers real value for free by showing ads. So fixing ad tech is a worthy goal. But many of us have lost faith in ads, and hundreds of millions of us now block them altogether.Separately, ads and ad trackers take their toll on computing power, battery life and network usage. And then some ads are just plain bad. About one in 200 ads is a form of malware, and more than one in 100 video ads is fraudulent, according to a December report from security company Confiant.Sure, we could pay our way to a healthier internet. Spending money on paywalls and subscriptions is a great way to get online video, news and music without ads’ downsides. But honestly, how many services are you going to pay for on top of your phone bill, broadband, Netflix, HBO Now, Spotify and Amazon Prime? We don’t generally bristle at ads in magazines and newspapers, and some of us even tune into the Super Bowl to watch them.How Brave’s ad system worksThe first phase of Brave’s ad system won’t actually pay anybody anything, but instead will just get the system on its feet. Actual payments are scheduled to arrive in several weeks with the release of Brave 1.0. When it kicks in, you’ll get 70 percent of the ad revenue. Brave collects the rest. A slider will let you pick how many ads to see each day, from one to 20. Just seeing an ad generates a bit of revenue, but clicking on it generates more.How much money? As a lower bound, perhaps $5 per month if you see 120 ads, Eich estimated. “We aim higher,” he added Tuesday on Twitter.The Brave Rewards system is designed to reduce ad fraud, malvertising, and privacy invasion.The Brave Rewards system seeks to reduce ad fraud, malvertising and privacy invasion. Brave It’s an opt-in system. So unless you enable it, you’ll just keep getting the regular ad-blocking Brave. “If enough opt in, that could become the main revenue of the company,” Eich said, adding that he thinks it’s possible that 40 percent of users could sign up.Initially, Brave’s ads will target you based on website context, inferring your interest in ad-related subjects by the content of websites you visit. In coming months, Brave plans more sophisticated targeting, based on things like the text you type into search engines. “Search queries are still a hot intent signal,” Eich said, meaning they’re a good predictor of where you might be spending money. What’s different about Brave’s system is that all the targeting is done inside the browser. Publishers and advertisers don’t know anything about you; they aim for particular keywords that the browser can match internally. All the outside parties see is confirmation that people saw their ads.This first phase of Brave’s ads is just between the advertisers and you. Later this year, Brave plans another phase in partnership with publishers. There, ads will appear on the websites you visit, not just in separate tabs. In that phase, publishers will get 70 percent of the ad revenue, you’ll get 15 percent and Brave will get 15 percent, Eich said.”We’re trying to align interests with a transparent fee schedule,” Eich said. “That takes a lot of the fear out of it.”For now, the system works only on Brave for personal computers. Phone users will get it, but Brave doesn’t have the necessary payment plumbing yet. The next step on that path will be the inclusion of a digital wallet in the Android version of Brave, scheduled for this month, Eich said.Catering to the crypto crowdBrave’s initial ads are supplied by networks, including BuySellAds and TAP Network, and by three cryptocurrency-focused companies that might be interested in Brave’s techie audience: AirSwap, Fluidity and Uphold.Why the crypto connection? Because Brave relies on it and already used it successfully to raise startup funding for the company in 2017.Brave created a payment system called Brave Rewards that uses a cryptocurrency-like payment technology called the basic attention token (BAT) that enables low-cost financial transactions between advertisers, publishers, Brave and you. Bitcoin, the highest profile cryptocurrency, hasn’t fared well over the past year, but BAT is intended to facilitate payments, not to be some kind of hype-pumped investment vehicle.Already, Brave can be used to send BAT payments to website publishers, Twitch game streamers and YouTubers. By default, if you’ve opted into the system, Brave sends the funds monthly based on how often you spend time with the various creators. But you can also tip specific people or assign fixed contributions to creators and publishers you like.Today, Brave sends monthly BAT grants to Brave users that then are distributed to creators who’ve signed up to receive them. The idea with Brave’s ad system is that the ad revenue will substitute for the grants, Eich said. For now, only creators can convert their received BAT into real-world money, but later Brave plans to let ordinary Brave users do so as well.Ad blockers are a problem for website publishers. Brave wants to build an ad ecosystem where some of the ad revenue you receive will be redirected to websites you visit.Ad blockers are a problem for website publishers. Brave wants to build an ad ecosystem where some of the ad revenue you receive will be redirected to websites you visit.  Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET Brave also hopes to let people use BAT for premium content like a news article you’d like to read without having to pull out your credit card for a subscription. Some have signed up to receive contributions if not necessarily to show Brave’s ads. The most notable names are news sites such as The Washington Post, The Guardian, Vice and Slate.Tough sellConvincing people to sign up for the whole system is one of Brave’s challenges. If nothing else, it’s a lot to digest. Big publishers will have to learn to accept a very different ad system, and Brave will have to convince creators and publishers to sign on. Tens of thousands have joined up so far, though.One example of the difficulties arose in December when YouTuber Tom Scott, who has 1.4 million subscribers, objected to Brave’s ways. Brave users can contribute BAT to publishers and creators even if they haven’t signed up for Brave, holding the tokens in escrow for a year in case they do sign up. Otherwise, the tokens return to the user growth pool Brave uses to generate interest in the BAT system.Scott didn’t like the system. “I don’t ask for donations or crowdfunding on any platform … If someone’s asking you for money or suggesting that you can donate to me, it’s not true and you should stay well clear,” he tweeted. “This warning is prompted by a company called Brave, who’ve been taking cryptocurrency donations ‘for me,’ using my name and photo, without my consent,” he added in a follow-up tweet.Brave scrambled to make changes after the concern. Two days after Scott’s complaint, Brave issued an update to “clearly indicate which publishers and creators have not yet joined Brave Rewards so users can better control how they donate and tip,” the company said. “Moreover, creators that have not verified with Brave will no longer have their YouTube or Twitch channel images appear within Brave Rewards.”And last week, it made another change: Contributions and tips to unverified publishers are now held in the browser and transferred if the recipient signs up within 90 days — or otherwise returned.Scott tweeted Tuesday that he’s mollified: “These are good changes, and they fix the complaints I had!”But evidently it’s not a simple matter to try to rebuild online advertising. Eich hopes for the best.”It’s going to be a bumpy ride,” Eich said. “We can make a better world.”First published Jan. 15, 9 a.m. PT.Update, 10:54 a.m. PT: Adds Twitter response to Brave changes from Tom Scott. Update, 1:13 p.m. PT: Adds estimate for how much money you could expect to earn. Update, 3:09 p.m. PT, clarifies that ad keyword matching doesn’t send information outside the browser.Blockchain Decoded: CNET looks at the tech powering bitcoin — and soon, too, a myriad of services that will change your life.Follow the Money: This is how digital cash is changing the way we save, shop and work. 6last_img read more

Putin accuses BBC of supporting Navalny

first_imgVladimir PutinRussian president Vladimir Putin on Thursday responded to a question from a BBC reporter on opposition leader Alexei Navalny by accusing the British broadcaster of supporting the Kremlin critic.“When I heard you were from the BBC, I didn’t doubt for a moment you would ask precisely that question because it’s in a certain sense propaganda of the people whom you support,” Putin said answering a question about whether he sees Navalny as a political competitor following nationwide protests organised by the opposition leader.Navalny has been sentenced to 30 days behind bars after being detained Monday on his way to a protest in Moscow against government corruption, where hundreds were arrested in the city centre.“Any form of protest, including demonstrations, should remain in the framework of the law,” Putin said. “Those who violate the law must answer for these violations.”“It’s one thing to organise protests, and another to use these protests as an instrument for provocations and exacerbating the situation for self-promotion,” Putin said, without mentioning Navalny by name in his customary manner.“This is done not to improve the situation in the country, not to solve people’s problems, but to solve one’s own problems that have to do with self-publicity.”Navalny has organised protests on March 26 and June 12 after airing a film alleging that Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev commands vast personal wealth through a network of foundations, which was viewed over 23 million times and re-ignited the opposition’s anti-corruption message.The 41-year-old lawyer has announced his intention to stand for president against Putin in 2018, though Putin himself has dodged questions whether he will run for what would be his fourth historic term.Putin was speaking to journalists after his annual marathon phone-in with Russian citizens, during which he said that judging by the public’s questions sent to the studio, government corruption is “not a priority.”last_img read more