Netball Jamaica hits back

first_img “I realised from Fast5 Championships that Netball Jamaica really don’t want me to be a part of their coaching staff,” she added. However, Netball Jamaica’s public relations officer, Wayne Lewis, said Francis should blame herself and not the association for her failure to get the job. “If Netball Jamaica didn’t want Connie Francis, we would have just accepted the recommendations from the technical committee, employed Mrs McCracken and move on,” said Lewis. “But the fact that we opened up, was to give Connie Francis another opportunity since based on the reports from the technical committee Mrs McCracken was a lot stronger than her in the interviews,” he said. Meanwhile, Netball Jamaica said Allison-McCracken would be in charge for a six-month probation period. In their release on Wednesday, Netball Jamaica said Allison-McCracken who is of Jamaican parentage, brings to the position substantial training in the areas of sports psychology and netball coaching. She holds a United Kingdom Level 2 coaching certificate and has vast experience in game introduction and netball skills development at different levels. Netball Jamaica has hit back at former coach Connie Francis after she said yesterday that there were people within the organisation who did not want her to coach the national senior team. Francis’ outburst came after she was overlooked for the vacant Sunshine Girls job. Francis who has been coaching for more than 20 years, was among three candidates that were interviewed for the post, which has been vacant since Minneth Reynolds resigned last November. Netball Jamaica announced Englishwoman Jermaine Allison-McCracken as the new coach on Wednesday night. “At first I was told that it was a board decision but deep down in the back of my head, I think that the technical person must have a say in who coaches our national team,” said Francis. BLAME YOURSELFlast_img read more

Land, Sexual Related Cases Dominate Nimba Trial Docket

first_imgJudge Roland Dahn gives his May Term of Court opening charges.Judge Roland F. Dahn disclosesCllr Roland F. Dahn, the newly assigned Resident Judge of the Eighth Judicial Circuit Court in Nimba County, said there are over 250 cases dominating the trial docket. The cases, he said include land, sexual and drug related cases, as well as some civil matters that are pending adjudication in the March Term of court.Judge Dahn made the disclosure recently at the opening of the May Term of Court, held at the Eighth Judicial Circuit Court in Sanniquellie. He said there are 201 civil cases, and 78 criminal cases.He further explained that among the 201 civil cases, 73 involved real estate or land related cases, while the others involved contracts, divorce, and debts.Judge Dahn then warned that the issue of real estate cases must not be overemphasized, because it is increasing on a daily basis.He said on the criminal docket, sexual-related cases dominate, followed by murder, manslaughter, and aggravated assaults, and drug-related cases,”Judge Dahn called for more attention to the drug laws, and the growing use of illicit drugs, something he said was damaging many of the youth. He meanwhile called on the security apparatuses, to double the fight against drugs abuse, which involves the illegal use of narcotic substances.“Those bringing the harmful substances into the country have spoiled our children, while they built fabulous homes from money they made from the sale of illegal drugs. Therefore, we need to stand strong,” he said.Few years ago, A Nigerian was arrested in Ganta with some consignment of cocaine hidden in his African slippers. He subsequently charged and sent to the Sanniquellie Magisterial Court for preliminary hearing, was placed under bond, but his kinsmen took him to Monrovia without being tried.Challenges:Judge Dahn has also outlined challenges facing the court, beginning with speedy trial as the failure of party litigants to make a follow up in the court lead to overcrowding of trial docket.He said the court believes in first come first served basis, but victims and those who brought their case to court are not showing up to serve as witness for the prosecution to do it work.He said that some of the criminal cases date years back, where the accused are in jail without being tried, while the complaints or the victims’ family sit at home without perusing the case to help the prosecuting team.Judge Dahn: “How will those cases be removed from the trial docket, if the party litigants refused to show up for hearing.”Dahn took over from Judge Emery Paye as the new Resident Judge of the Eighth Judicial Circuit Court on February 12, 2019. Paye has being retired at age 70.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more