Registration opens for Holy Half Marathon

first_imgThe time for training season has officially begun for people running in the Holy Half Marathon this year. The Student Union Board (SUB) has opened registration for the ninth annual half marathon that will take participants on a scenic route through Notre Dame’s campus March 23. “The Holy Half is one of the biggest student-run events on campus and has quickly become a Notre Dame tradition,” Maria Murphy, an SUB representative, said. Murphy, who is also a Holy Half programmer this year, said the best part of the Holy Half is that runners not only get to train and compete in a 13.1 mile race, but also get to make a difference in the South Bend community on behalf of the University. “All proceeds from the race go to the Women’s Care Center (WCC) and the Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County,” Murphy said. “Our goal this year is to raise $40,000 for these awesome organizations.” This year the Holy Half will include a new course for runners, Murphy said. She said the event will also feature Mike Collins, the voice of Notre Dame Stadium, as the emcee. “Runners will get a 2013 Holy Half t-shirt and a bunch of other free goodies from our sponsors,” Murphy said. “All volunteers will get lots of food and our undying thanks.” Sponsors for the 2013 Holy Half include GU Energy, Blistex, Jimmy Johns, Dunkin’ Donuts, Harper Cancer Research Institute, Hagerty, Zone Perfect and ABRO Industries, Murphy said. For those runners who aren’t prepared to run 13.1 miles, there is also a 10k race option that will take place 15 minutes after the half marathon begins. Murphy said there is a capacity for 1,300 runners. For students who aren’t runners but still want to get involved, there are plenty of spots open for student volunteers to help set up the race, run water stations and cheer on runners. “By volunteering I gained so much respect for people who were able to run that long,” Ann Kebede, a 2012 volunteer for the event, said. “It was especially cool to watch the girls who kept such a fast pace. I also liked seeing people I knew run past while I cheered them on.” Kebede said volunteering was a great way to get involved in the event because she knew she wouldn’t want to participate as a runner. “A lot of what I did was cheer people on and give them motivation to keep going,” Kebede said. The Holy Half is a great way for Notre Dame and the surrounding community to be able to physically participate in the athletic culture of the school, she said. “It is an athletic event that the whole campus can do, as well as the outside community,” Kebede said. “Since athletics is such a big part of Notre Dame, this is a great thing that is open to everyone and gives people the opportunity to be active for a day.” Murphy said SUB has given the Holy Half a lot of freedom this year. She added that SUB plans to make the race fun for all and, most importantly, raise money for WCC and the Family Center of Saint Joseph’s County. “We are so happy with how the race is coming together and cannot wait for March 23,” Murphy said. The deadline for registration is on March 14.last_img read more

Earthquake advisory warning in effect until Tuesday

first_imgDesign by Katlyn LeeThe California Office of Emergency Services issued an earthquake advisory warning for Southern California on Friday in response to an earthquake swarm in the Brawley Seismic Zone near the Salton Sea. Residents of the area should be on heightened alert for the possibility of a major earthquake until Tuesday, the report said. According to the U.S. Geological Services, more than 140 small earthquakes between 1.4 and 4.3 in magnitude have hit the Bombay Beach area since Monday. The USGS said that the chances of a magnitude 7 or above earthquake are between 0.006 percent and 0.2 percent, with the chances decreasing over the course of the week.“California is earthquake country. We must always be prepared and not let our guard down,” OES Director Mark Ghilarducci said to CBS. “The threat of an earthquake on the San Andreas Fault hasn’t gone away, so this is another important opportunity for us to revisit our emergency plans and learn what steps you need to take if a significant earthquake hits.”The advisory was issued to residents and officials in Ventura, San Diego, San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange, Los Angeles, Kern and Imperial counties. If a large earthquake does occur, it could directly impact USC.Many native residents of Southern California remember the effects of the Northridge earthquake in 1994. At 6.7 magnitude, office buildings, parking structures and parts of major highways collapsed, with some apartment buildings sustaining irreparable damage.Since then, there have been numerous smaller earthquakes that have left minimal impact in the area. Carin Chin, a junior majoring in NGOs and social change, said that the frequency at which the quakes occur has desensitized her.“Having lived in California for 20 years, my view on earthquakes has definitely been numbed, since they happen so often in small amounts,” Chin said.While there may be a lack of concern on the part of native Southern California residents, students who are not from the area and not used to the frequent quakes, may have more reason to be alarmed. Anisha Mandhania, a graduate student at the Gould School of Law, said that her own exposure to earthquakes only served to heighten her awareness of the need for earthquake preparedness, rather than dampen it. “I experienced this extreme earthquake back in India some 10 or 15 years back,” Mandhania said. “It just happened all of a sudden, and afterwards there were smaller tremors for one month or so.”For Mandhania, this experience solidified her belief that the California advisory is an important step in ensuring that everyone remains safe.The Southern California Earthquake Center, which is headquartered at USC, researches earthquakes and looks for new ways to be better prepared in the event of a big one. USC also participates in earthquake preparedness drills at both the University Park Campus and the Health Sciences Campus.last_img read more

Morocco continues Club World Cup planning, but AFCON still in limbo

first_imgPreparations for the Club World Cup in Morocco in December are continuing “as planned” even though the country has asked to be replaced as host for the African Cup of Nations (AFCON) the following month due to fears over the spread of the Ebola epidemic. Morocco has no reported cases of the deadly virus that has killed nearly 5,000 people in West Africa, almost all in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.Unlike the African Nations Cup, this year’s eight-team Club World Cup features only two African sides. The tournament brings together the champions of each of FIFA’s six confederations – in Europe’s case Real Madrid – plus the national league champion from the host country.Matches will be played in Rabat and Marrakesh and FIFA is comfortable that Ebola poses no threat as things stand now. “Should the situation change, we will be in touch with the participating clubs accordingly,” FIFA said in a statement.FIFA said it is in contact with Moroccan authorities and is “constantly updating its position” on the advice of the World Health Organization.Morocco is at loggerheads with the Confederation of African Football over delaying or postponing the Continent’s blue riband event, fearing fans might travel from West Africa for the 16-nation, three-week tournament. CAF insists it must go ahead on the planned dates – January 17 to February 8 – and will meet with Moroccan authorities early next month to try and forge an agreement. South Africa, originally touted as a possible replacement, say they can’t step in while Sudan and Egypt, other countries mentioned as potential stand-ins, are apparently lukewarm over the idea of taking over.last_img read more