Half-time: Hull City 1 QPR 1

first_imgCharlie Austin’s goal – his sixth of the season – put QPR ahead at the KC Stadium before Michael Dawson equalised.Austin met Tjaronn Chery’s 25th-minute corner with a glancing header which crossed the line before Andrew Robertson could clear.But the Tigers hit back when Dawson headed home Tom Huddlestone’s left-wing free-kick eight minutes before the break.Hull had been lively early on, with Sone Aluko bringing a good save from Rob Green before just failing to connect with Robertson’s dangerous cross.But Chery has been a consistent threat to the Tigers defence and had a long-range effort saved before delivering the corner which led to the opening goal.Chery then sent another long-range shot wide and Rangers seemed to be growing in confidence before Hull levelled.Green, available again after serving a one-match ban, was restored to the side along with Alejandro Faurlin. It meant Alex Smithies and Daniel Tozser dropped to the bench.QPR: Green; Perch, Onuoha, Angella, Konchesky; Henry, Faurlin; Phillips, Luongo, Chery; Austin.Subs: Smithies, Hall, Gladwin, Doughty, Mackie, Emmanuel-Thomas, Tozser.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

How Plants Send Email: Update

first_imghref=”crev07.htm#plant17″>07/13/2001 headline), we reported the startling finding that plants talk to themselves in email.  What’s new in this field?  Is there really an interplant intranet?    In the Oct. 5 issue of Current Biology,1 Norman, Frederick and Sieburth report evidence that a signal molecule named BYPASS1 is sent from the roots to the tips of the plant, and suppresses the growth of leaves.  It acts as a negative regulator of plant growth hormones.    Plant growth hormones are produced in the tips of shoots.  With too much growth hormone, leaves might grow too rapidly without knowing when the roots are struggling to find water, are having trouble getting through compacted soil, or fighting other harsh conditions.  The roots need to be able to regulate leaf growth, therefore, and must be able to turn up the release of hormone only when the supply is adequate.  The report on EurekAlert describes the control like a faucet handle that the root turns, but since the flow is at the shoot, the handle is really up where the leaves are.  By sending this chemical signal up the network, the root has remote control over the spigot of growth hormone: something akin to switch remotely operated by a computer system administrator, who sends a correctly-formatted message the switch understands.    This explains how the same plant can look different depending on where it grows.  Plants are composed of cells without a central nervous system or brain, yet the various parts need to act in concert.  A plant can’t just walk away in tough times to look for greener pastures; it has to respond as a unit to changing conditions.  The solution is a coordinated system of signals, feedback and regulatory functions.  This study shows that roots are not just sending water and nutrients blindly upward, unaware of the conditions above ground.  They are sending chemical signals to keep in touch with the leaf tips.  Undoubtedly this is two-way communication, because the roots also must be informed of conditions above ground.    BYPASS1, a gene that codes for a carotenoid compound, is one more example of signal transduction, or “email,” in plants.  The July 2001 headline spoke of messenger RNA used for signalling.  Undoubtedly proteins and other chemical compounds as well are used in the interplant intranet to convey messages.  Each chemical needs a receptor at the destination that understands the message.  A plant, therefore, comprises an information processing system.  Because information is passed throughout the branching pathways inside a plant, with sources and destinations defined, containing messages that are translated and understood and acted upon, the analogy to email over an intranet is an apt one.    Overarching this system is a network of networks.  Different species of plants are also able to communicate with each other through the underground pipeline (see 06/17/2004 headline).  This shows that the local area networks of individual plants are combined into a wide-area network, or internet.  Information processing over a communication network is therefore the foundation of ecology:Plant architecture is regulated by endogenous developmental programs, but it can also be strongly influenced by cues derived from the environment.  For example, rhizosphere conditions such as water and nutrient availability affect shoot and root architecture; this implicates the root as a source of signals that can override endogenous developmental programs. …The BPS1 expression profile clustered with a group of genes containing many kinases and transcription factors proposed to possibly function in a signaling network.1Another article on EurekAlert discussed how researchers at Duke University are following one particular email message, a protein regulator in root cells.  The scientists “made the surprising finding that the … protein is one means by which one root cell ‘talks’ to another to instruct it to develop in a certain way.”1Norman, Frederick and Sieburth, “BYPASS1 Negatively Regulates a Root-Derived Signal that Controls Plant Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 19, 5 October 2004, Pages 1739-1746, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.09.045.When you send an email to a friend, it presupposes a large infrastructure of computers, routers, wires, and software.  Without them, your message would sit in your computer and go nowhere.  Your message is formatted into packets according the standards of internet protocol.  Every piece of hardware and software in the network has to understand the protocol.  It has to be able to read the header to properly route the packet from the source to the destination.  Some messages can be broadcast to a group of recipients, or to everyone on the network.  Some require acknowledgement before action; others, like a message in a bottle, can be picked up by any recipient.  Different protocols provide many different services.  Somehow, a plant accomplishes the same thing.  It can send messages to individuals, groups, or “anyone online.”  The receptors understand the messages and act accordingly.    The internet is a relatively new human invention that has revolutionized society.  It didn’t just happen.  It is the result of many efforts initiated by intelligent designers who dreamed of establishing a robust communications system.  As we pat ourselves on the back for our communications network, now we find that plants had one all along.  Think of the messaging going on from the roots of a giant redwood to the topmost leaves, and then all the messages being passed underground from plant to plant.  It wouldn’t be surprising to find out someday that plants are already programmed with spam filtering, security and antiterrorism surveillance and maybe even innovations we have not even imagined yet.    Signal transduction – the passing and recognition of messages – is a defining characteristic of life.  All living things are continually in the communication business.  Single cells have elaborate signal transduction mechanisms for recognizing “self” and “other” entities, and for regulating all the machines in the molecular factory.  Cells communicate with other cells.  Within multicellular organisms, cells communicate within the body and without.  Plants, animals and humans are constantly sending and receiving messages.  Even the machines humans make, from railroad semaphores to telegraphs to wireless internet communications, are extensions of our own intelligent signalling systems.  Inanimate matter does not do any of this on its own.  Solids, liquids and gases can exchange energy through conduction, convection and radiation, but neither send nor understand signals that allow them to make decisions, unless programmed by intelligent design.  Since signaling is a fundamental property of life, why should anyone presume it could emerge from nonlife?  Would it not make more sense to assume that there is a living Creator who is a communicator by nature, and that he extended his intelligence to the life he designed?    Non-sentient life might be considered analogous to our most advanced human robotics, with robust engineering design that allows it to respond to changing conditions (see 09/22/2004 headline).  Into humans, however, the Source of all communication – the Word – imbued an image of his own sentience, so that we can not only recognize and respond to messages, but understand them.  To these alone he shared the greatest communication of all (Hebrews 1:1-3).(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Video: Arkansas RB Jonathan Williams Continues Rehab With Underwater Agility Drills

first_imgJonathan Williams doing rehab underwater.Jonathan Williams RehabArkansas running back Jonathan Williams hasn’t played all season due to a foot injury, but the bruising senior is working his way back to the gridiron. Whether he’ll next suit up for the Razorbacks or in the NFL, Williams is determined to make a full recovery. Last week, he posted video of himself running for the first time since the injury, and today he shared footage of himself doing underwater agility drills. Best of luck to Williams as he continues to progress in his rehab.last_img

Panama Canal Ups Neopanamax Reservations to Seven

first_imgzoom The Panama Canal will increase the number of daily booking slots available for Neopanamax vessels from six to seven effective December 1, 2017.With this measure, the Panama Canal said that it is embracing the additional capacity allowed for by the new, larger locks. The seven daily booking slots for Neopanamax vessels are offered in addition to the 23 slots available each day for transit through the Panamax locks.“This increase is the direct result of our efficient, streamlined use of resources and effective collaboration as we meet the growing demand for transits through the Expanded Canal,” Jorge L. Quijano, Panama Canal Administrator, said.The additional slot is now available for ships transiting northbound, from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean, and was first offered beginning September 26 through a special competition in the first booking period in adherence to Panama Canal regulations.Container vessels will have preference over other vessel types when allocating these additional slots, the Panama Canal said. If no container vessels are interested, the slot will be awarded to any vessel that participated in the special competition, based on the Panama Canal Customer Ranking. After the special competition, the slots will be available to all vessels on a first-come, first-served basis.The Neopanamax Locks can transit additional ships beyond the number of daily slots allotted. The Expanded Canal transited a record 10 Neopanamax ships on November 17. The canal’s daily performance far exceeds the three to four daily transits originally expected.The Panama Canal informed that it will continue to explore ways to expand its capacity, working toward the goal of offering eight Neopanamax reservation slots by the end of the first quarter of 2018 and gradually implementing additional measures to increase capacity through 2019.last_img read more

ALANIS MORISSETTES JAGGED LITTLE PILL MUSICAL HEADING TO BROADWAY

first_img Twitter NEW YORK — “You Oughta Know” Alanis Morissette is coming to Broadway.The singer-songwriter has allowed songs from her 1995 breakthrough album “Jagged Little Pill” to be used in a new musical and producers plan to land it on Broadway this fall. “You Oughta Know” was a song on that Grammy-winning album.“Jagged Little Pill” played the American Repertory Theater last summer. It’s directed by Diane Paulus and has an original story by Diablo Cody, who wrote “Juno.” Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Morissette wrote the album with Glen Ballard, who collaborated with Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics on the music for “Ghost: The Musical.”Morissette joins a glut of pop and rock stars to try their hand at Broadway, including Bruce Springsteen, Sting, The Go-Go’s, Sara Bareilles, Billy Joel and Cyndi Lauper.The Associated Press Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img

A halocarbon leak at Yellowknifes defunct Giant Mine site

first_imgAPTN National NewsMore concerns at Yellowknife’s toxic giant gold mine.385 kilograms of halo-carbon recently leaked during a test freeze of one of the arsenic chambers.The incident has environmentalists concerned over long term care and maintenance at the site.APTN’s Cullen Crozier has more.last_img

Eurovision has been named as the host broadcaster

first_imgEurovision has been named as the host broadcaster for the 2015 Alpine World Ski championships following a deal with the local organizing committee in Vail/Beaver Creek.Eurovision Production Coordination, the EBU’s production company, will build a new broadcast installation to provide an international signal in HD from all events.The EBU already holds separate agreements for the worldwide media rights and the marketing rights to the Alpine World Ski championships.EBU director, sports and business, Stefan Kuerten said: “We’re very happy to be the host broadcaster for the 2015 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, as it’s a win-win for all involved in the sport of skiing. After our successful production of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Moscow this year, we will deliver another top quality production that will be seen by a worldwide audience.”last_img

More people now prefer to watch TV shows on intern

first_imgMore people now prefer to watch TV shows on internet connected devices than on traditional TV sets, according to new research by Accenture.The company’s Digital Consumer Survey found that the percentage of consumers who said they prefer watching TV shows on television sets plummeted by 55% over the past year – from 52% to 23%.At the same time, the proportion that said they would rather view TV shows on a laptop or desktop climbed from 32% last year to 42% this year.Some 13% also said they prefer watching TV shows on their smartphones, compared with 10% last year.“The dominance of the TV set as the undisputed go-to entertainment device is ending,” said Gavin Mann, global managing director for Accenture’s broadcast business.“While a great number of people still watch plenty of TV shows on TV sets, our research uncovers a rapid acceleration in their preference for viewing on other digital devices – especially laptops, desktops and smartphones.”The report notes a four-year trend in the decline in TV viewing and said that as recently as 2014 some 65% of consumers preferred the TV set for viewing TV shows.In India there was a “particularly steep decline” in the percentage of consumers who prefer to watch TV shows on a TV set – dropping from 47% to 10%. In the US the proportion fell from 59% to 25% and in the UK it dropped from 56% to 25%.The study also found that some 41% of consumers said they would rather view short video clips on their mobile phone, up from 28% last year. By contrast, just 5% said they would rather watch short clips on a TV set.“The massive and accelerating push by communications and media companies to provide ubiquitous content — TV everywhere including over-the-top — has empowered consumers to access high-quality content across multiple devices,” said Mann.The research results are based on an online survey of 26,000 consumers in 26 countries from around the world. The sample in each country was representative of the online population and ages of respondents ranged from 14-to-55 and over.The survey covered countries including Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, the United Arab Emirates, the UK and the US.last_img read more

In This Issue   Nikkei plunges 73   Chin

first_imgIn This Issue. *  Nikkei plunges 7.3%.. *  Chinese manufacturing contracts. *  Two handed economists. *  Gold rebounds. And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts! Markets Take What Big Ben Said Hawkishly? Good day.  And a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday to you! What the heck was I thinking, was running through my mind when the alarm went off this morning. In an attempt to relieve Chris from having to write the Pfennig this morning, I told him not to worry about it, I would write it.. All the time knowing that my flight from Houston wasn’t getting in until very, very late..  And that was before all the cancellations! What the heck is going on with the aviation sector? It’s a very long story, so I won’t bore you with the details, but just know that I was ready to raise the white flag and say “you win, you’ve beaten my will”.  Darn airlines! OK. The Big news overnight came from China, where the Chinese Purchasing Managers Index (manufacturing) fell to a seven month low of 49.6, which is obviously below the line in the sand demarcation of 50. Any number below 50 represents contraction in the sector. This comes as a bit of a surprise to me. Sure I saw the tea leaves on China’s economic slowdown, but didn’t think it would show such a cooling off of domestic demand. I did think that the external headwinds that face China every day, like Europe and the U.S. would play badly with this data, but the slowdown of domestic demand was a surprise.. This news sent the Japanese Nikkei to the woodshed. The Japanese stock market plunged 7.3% overnight. The Nikkei had been the darling of stock markets ever since the new PM Abe, made his announcement about promoting growth and inflation.  Since China is Japan’s biggest trading partner, the Chinese slowdown in manufacturing, really sunk the Nikkei’s battleship.  The Nikkei’s plunge is weighing heavily in Europe this morning, and will probably hang like a dark storm cloud over the U.S. stock market too. The other Big news overnight, has been the decision by the Eurozone leaders to cut austerity. the leaders apparently are receiving too much complaining and such, and see their ability to get reelected diminishing.  I say that in complete disgust, because the austerity was working. and now when things get tough, the though roll over and look for their bellies to be scratched! Sure the Eurozone economy had contracted since the 3rd QTR of 2011, did these “leaders” really think it wouldn’t, given the massive cuts to spending that they implemented?  Well, at least the leaders didn’t say, “we raise the white flag on austerity, and pin our colors to the “stimulus” mast.”  At least that’s for now. So. With the weak manufacturing report in China, the plunge of the Nikkei in Japan, and the Eurozone leaders rolling over to get their bellies scratched, the currencies are not having a good day. However, as  I write, Gold is up $21 this morning. Of course that’s before the NY boys and girls arrive at their desks and decide whether to play their shell game with Gold again or not. The bias to buy dollars is back on the table after a couple of days of not much movement either way. Yesterday, we had Big Ben Bernanke giving his testimony to the lawmakers on the state of the economy. For us “old timers” this trek to the “hill” by the Fed Chairman used to be called the Humphrey-Hawkins testimony. But that bill requiring the Fed Chairman to make this trip expired many years ago, and since it made so much sense for this to happen twice a  year, it has continued.  We usually get some real interesting quotes from Big Ben, and yesterday was no exception. Speaking from both sides of his mouth, Big Ben threw a cat among the pigeons by saying, “The Fed could take a step down in our pace of purchases in the next few meetings.”   But then threw cold water on that by saying, “A premature tightening of monetary policy could lead interest rates to rise temporarily but would also carry a substantial risk of slowing or ending the economic recovery and causing inflation to fall further.” So. What do you think? Sounds like he was waffling to me. Trying to please everyone with a little bit of this, and little bit of that. it started with a kiss, now we’re up to bat.  and so on.  These guys like to speak out of both sides of their mouths for sure. My dad used to say they were “two handed economists”. They would say, “on one hand, we could see. , but on the other hand we could see this.”  Never really saying what they thought for sure! And the markets’ reaction to the statement by Big Ben? Well, now there you’ve got another pot to stir. You never know how the markets will take something like this, and yesterday was no different, as the markets decided to forget Big Ben’s waffling, and go with a “hawkish” view of his testimony.  That was good for the dollar in the immediate reaction to the statement, but has since dissipated a bit. The euro is attempting to eke out some small gains this morning, after getting walloped yesterday.  The Eurozone saw some better readings of their latest manufacturing with the index ticking up to 47.8 from 47. Still contraction territory, but an upside surprise should be enough to kick start a currency, as it has this morning with the euro. I told you above about the Nikkei’s plunge, and in the never ending attempt by the Japanese to move in opposite directions than other markets. The Japanese yen is rallying on the Nikkei news.  Strange eh? But remember, all the time the Nikkei was rallying the past 3 months, yen was getting passed around like a pack of cigarettes at a prison, and now that the Nikkei has plunged overnight, yen recovered.  I really don’t expect much more to come of this  scenario, so don’t get all lathered up and go out and back up the truck with yen. But then, that’s just my opinion, and I could be wrong! The Aussie dollar (A$) is getting sold again this morning. This time, the selling, is tied to the announcement by Ford Motor Co. that they will close down their Australian local car production, along with two manufacturing plants.  That’s not a good sign folks.  The New Zealand dollar / kiwi, is getting sold alongside the A$ this morning.  Sentiment toward these two is really plunging. And it started with a kiss. no wait.. it started with a rate cut in Australia and news of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) announcing that they were sellers of kiwi. The Swiss franc is having a couple of good days of trading, a couple of days that it hadn’t seen in some time.  No worries, the franc is very weak VS the euro, compared to a year ago, when it was bumping up against the 1.20 floor that the Swiss National Bank (SNB) put into place in September of 2011.  Today, the cross to euros is trading around 1.2470. So, the franc could use a little strength, eh? I had a reader send me a note and say that he noticed that Japan had booked a Trade Deficit for 11 months now, and since I always say that “We’re turning Japanese” what did that mean for the U.S.?  Well. In the case of Trade Deficits. The Japanese are actually turning American, for the U.S. has long dominated the Trade Deficits.  But, to the Japanese, this booking of Trade Deficits is a real psychological problem, for they were the captains of trade surplus, long before the Chinese awoke from their slumber. I told you above that Gold was up $21 as I was writing.  Gold and other metals were also pushing higher yesterday before the Big Ben statement. And then they weren’t.  So, this recovery this morning is warranted, in my opinion. For in my opinion, Big Ben didn’t’ tell us anything that we didn’t already know. Sure we all know that he could decide to end stimulus any ole time he wants to, but when is he going to want to? That’s the question, and as long as there are questions, the markets should take the dollar to the woodshed. I’ve told you before, and I tell crowds whenever they come to listen to me talk, that I wouldn’t be surprised to see  QEnterity. You know, 10 years from now, someone from EverBank will be up on the stage talking about QE 22, or 23, or 24. As Chris told you earlier this week, I get the honor of talking about a boat load of economic data the next two days.  First, we have Fed St. Louis President, James Bullard speaking today. then we’ll see the usual Thursday fare of Weekly Initial Jobless Claims. In addition, New Home Sales, and the latest PMI Manufacturing Index, and Bloomberg Consumer Confidence. Then There Was This.Since the markets were so moved by Big Ben’s talk yesterday, I thought that this comment by Fed Head William Dudley that I found on Moneynews.com played well with my thought that Big Ben is not ready to scale back his bond buying stimulus.. Let’s listen in to what Mr. Dudley had to say.. “Federal Reserve Bank of New York President William C. Dudley said policy makers will know in three to four months whether the economy is healthy enough to overcome federal budget cuts and allow the central bank to begin reducing record stimulus. “I don’t really understand very well how the tug-of-war between the fiscal drag and the improving economy are going to sort of work their way out,” Dudley said in an interview with Michael McKee airing on Bloomberg Television. “Three or four months from now I think you’re going to have a much better sense of, is the economy healthy enough to overcome the fiscal drag or not.” Dudley’s remarks underscore that Fed officials have yet to reach consensus on when or how to dial back their $85 billion monthly bond-purchase program designed to spur growth and lower unemployment. Philadelphia Fed President Charles Plosser has called for reducing stimulus at the Fed’s next meeting in June, while St. Louis’s James Bullard said Tuesday the purchases should continue. Chuck again. OK. these guys are all over the place with their forecasts, pretty soon, they’ll talk and no one will pay attention. Of course I wish that were the way it was now!  Anyway, the markets react and we have to shuffle through the mess they leave each and every time they think the Fed Heads are ready to pull the plug on stimulus. I tell them each time, but they just don’t listen that it’s print or suffer the consequences of a deeper depression than the one we’re in. To recap. Big Ben speaks out of both sides of his mouth, and the markets think he means he really is ready to remove stimulus. Chuck says hogwash to that! The bias to buy dollars that entered the markets after the Bernanke speech, reversed a couple of days of healing in the currencies. The Nikkei plunges 7.3% overnight, and China posts a manufacturing index that showed contraction, sending the Asian markets reeling. Currencies today 5/23/13. American Style: A$ .9695, kiwi .8095, C$ .9675, euro 1.2880, sterling 1.5080, Swiss $1.0320, . European Style: rand 9.590, krone 5.8395, SEK 6.6675, forint 226.35, zloty 3.2625, koruna 20.2390, RUB 31.40, yen 101.70, sing 1.2645, HKD 7.7625, INR 55.58, China 6.1947, pesos 12.47, BRL 2.05, Dollar Index 83.95, Oil $93.36, 10-year 2%, Silver $22.40, and Gold. $1,390.20 That’s it for today. A great Big Happy Birthday today to my grandson, Braden Charles Butler.. Braden turns 2 today. It’s great having two grandsons that are close in age, watching them learn to interact with each other is a treat!  Kathy says when they turn 5 she’s taking them to Disneyworld. I tell her, I bet she changes her mind in 3 years!  Well, this weekend will be Memorial Day Weekend. The Backyard grills will get fired up, the public pools will open, and the old brickyard gets a workout in Indianapolis. But let’s not forget what the holiday is really about. And with that. here we go! Let’s make this a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday! Chuck Butler President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837last_img read more