Snowmobilers and ATV users asked to stay off farmer fields

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District and area farmers are asking residents to stay off area farmer fields this winter.A number of farmers were not able to harvest their crops this fall due to poor weather conditions.  Crops will remain in the fields until they can be harvested in the spring.Driving snowmobiles and other recreational vehicles on the crops will damage them, resulting in fewer crops being viable in the spring. If you need to get around a field, choose to drive around the edges than through the middle of the field. – Advertisement -At the November 14th Board Meeting, the Peace River Regional District Board resolved to take action in support the local agriculture industry by sending a letter to provincial and federal representatives, including Premier John Horgan, Minister of Agriculture, Lana Popham, MLA Dan Davies, MLA Mike Bernier, and MP Bob Zimmer.The Peace River Regional District would like to clarify that while the PRRD Board is in full support of the Agriculture industry and local farmers, there has not been a declaration of an Agricultural Emergency at this time.The Peace River Regional District Board will be meeting with local producer groups at a special board meeting on November 27th to discuss the difficult conditions and impacts producers are facing. The Peace River Regional District’s priority is to collaborate and work with local producer groups to forge a meaningful path forward together and advocate for solutions that work for Peace Region farmers.Advertisement Following the meeting, the PRRD Board will bring concerns of Peace Region producers forward to the Province to advocate for additional help and support.last_img read more

How Plants Send Email: Update

first_imghref=”crev07.htm#plant17″>07/13/2001 headline), we reported the startling finding that plants talk to themselves in email.  What’s new in this field?  Is there really an interplant intranet?    In the Oct. 5 issue of Current Biology,1 Norman, Frederick and Sieburth report evidence that a signal molecule named BYPASS1 is sent from the roots to the tips of the plant, and suppresses the growth of leaves.  It acts as a negative regulator of plant growth hormones.    Plant growth hormones are produced in the tips of shoots.  With too much growth hormone, leaves might grow too rapidly without knowing when the roots are struggling to find water, are having trouble getting through compacted soil, or fighting other harsh conditions.  The roots need to be able to regulate leaf growth, therefore, and must be able to turn up the release of hormone only when the supply is adequate.  The report on EurekAlert describes the control like a faucet handle that the root turns, but since the flow is at the shoot, the handle is really up where the leaves are.  By sending this chemical signal up the network, the root has remote control over the spigot of growth hormone: something akin to switch remotely operated by a computer system administrator, who sends a correctly-formatted message the switch understands.    This explains how the same plant can look different depending on where it grows.  Plants are composed of cells without a central nervous system or brain, yet the various parts need to act in concert.  A plant can’t just walk away in tough times to look for greener pastures; it has to respond as a unit to changing conditions.  The solution is a coordinated system of signals, feedback and regulatory functions.  This study shows that roots are not just sending water and nutrients blindly upward, unaware of the conditions above ground.  They are sending chemical signals to keep in touch with the leaf tips.  Undoubtedly this is two-way communication, because the roots also must be informed of conditions above ground.    BYPASS1, a gene that codes for a carotenoid compound, is one more example of signal transduction, or “email,” in plants.  The July 2001 headline spoke of messenger RNA used for signalling.  Undoubtedly proteins and other chemical compounds as well are used in the interplant intranet to convey messages.  Each chemical needs a receptor at the destination that understands the message.  A plant, therefore, comprises an information processing system.  Because information is passed throughout the branching pathways inside a plant, with sources and destinations defined, containing messages that are translated and understood and acted upon, the analogy to email over an intranet is an apt one.    Overarching this system is a network of networks.  Different species of plants are also able to communicate with each other through the underground pipeline (see 06/17/2004 headline).  This shows that the local area networks of individual plants are combined into a wide-area network, or internet.  Information processing over a communication network is therefore the foundation of ecology:Plant architecture is regulated by endogenous developmental programs, but it can also be strongly influenced by cues derived from the environment.  For example, rhizosphere conditions such as water and nutrient availability affect shoot and root architecture; this implicates the root as a source of signals that can override endogenous developmental programs. …The BPS1 expression profile clustered with a group of genes containing many kinases and transcription factors proposed to possibly function in a signaling network.1Another article on EurekAlert discussed how researchers at Duke University are following one particular email message, a protein regulator in root cells.  The scientists “made the surprising finding that the … protein is one means by which one root cell ‘talks’ to another to instruct it to develop in a certain way.”1Norman, Frederick and Sieburth, “BYPASS1 Negatively Regulates a Root-Derived Signal that Controls Plant Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 19, 5 October 2004, Pages 1739-1746, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.09.045.When you send an email to a friend, it presupposes a large infrastructure of computers, routers, wires, and software.  Without them, your message would sit in your computer and go nowhere.  Your message is formatted into packets according the standards of internet protocol.  Every piece of hardware and software in the network has to understand the protocol.  It has to be able to read the header to properly route the packet from the source to the destination.  Some messages can be broadcast to a group of recipients, or to everyone on the network.  Some require acknowledgement before action; others, like a message in a bottle, can be picked up by any recipient.  Different protocols provide many different services.  Somehow, a plant accomplishes the same thing.  It can send messages to individuals, groups, or “anyone online.”  The receptors understand the messages and act accordingly.    The internet is a relatively new human invention that has revolutionized society.  It didn’t just happen.  It is the result of many efforts initiated by intelligent designers who dreamed of establishing a robust communications system.  As we pat ourselves on the back for our communications network, now we find that plants had one all along.  Think of the messaging going on from the roots of a giant redwood to the topmost leaves, and then all the messages being passed underground from plant to plant.  It wouldn’t be surprising to find out someday that plants are already programmed with spam filtering, security and antiterrorism surveillance and maybe even innovations we have not even imagined yet.    Signal transduction – the passing and recognition of messages – is a defining characteristic of life.  All living things are continually in the communication business.  Single cells have elaborate signal transduction mechanisms for recognizing “self” and “other” entities, and for regulating all the machines in the molecular factory.  Cells communicate with other cells.  Within multicellular organisms, cells communicate within the body and without.  Plants, animals and humans are constantly sending and receiving messages.  Even the machines humans make, from railroad semaphores to telegraphs to wireless internet communications, are extensions of our own intelligent signalling systems.  Inanimate matter does not do any of this on its own.  Solids, liquids and gases can exchange energy through conduction, convection and radiation, but neither send nor understand signals that allow them to make decisions, unless programmed by intelligent design.  Since signaling is a fundamental property of life, why should anyone presume it could emerge from nonlife?  Would it not make more sense to assume that there is a living Creator who is a communicator by nature, and that he extended his intelligence to the life he designed?    Non-sentient life might be considered analogous to our most advanced human robotics, with robust engineering design that allows it to respond to changing conditions (see 09/22/2004 headline).  Into humans, however, the Source of all communication – the Word – imbued an image of his own sentience, so that we can not only recognize and respond to messages, but understand them.  To these alone he shared the greatest communication of all (Hebrews 1:1-3).(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

18-month-old boy falls into 60-ft borewell in Haryana; rescue operations on

first_imgAn 18-month-old child fell into a 60-feet-deep borewell in Haryana’s Balsamand village on Thursday and a massive operation is underway to rescue him, officials said. The child is safe, Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) in Hisar, Joginder Singh, said. Oxygen tubes have been dropped to help the child breathe, the officials said, adding that biscuits and juices have also been sent down the borewell. Nadim, fell into the borewell when he was playing with his friends outside his house, according to a villager.“The rescue operations are on. NDRF (National Disaster Response Force) personnel and experts from the army, assisted by local authorities are on the job. As of now, the child is safe,” he said. Earthmovers and other equipment have been pressed into service to rescue the child, and a medical team is also at the site, the officials said. On how long could it take to rescue the boy, the DSP said, “Massive operation is on, but these are technical issues and hence, no definite time-line can be given.”Police were informed about the incident by the boy’s family members and villagers. The child’s father is a labourer. Hisar Deputy Commissioner Ashok Kumar Meena said legal action will be taken against the person who dug the borewell without taking permission from the department concerned. The accident has again brought to the fore the dangers posed by uncovered borewells, which have turned into death traps for children.last_img read more

San Miguel backs Alab Pilipinas

first_imgView comments Read Next “It’s definitely a good partnership as they committed long term in supporting Alab Pilipinas as San Miguel believes in our vision,” the approachable executive said.“They don’t want to disappoint the Filipino fans here and all over the world.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThis isn’t the first go-round for San Miguel in the ABL as it competed for two seasons under the Beermen banner and flaunted the likes of former PBA Most Valuable Players Asi Taulava and Eric Menk, as well as an upstart June Mar Fajardo, who is the reigning four-time PBA MVP.Under coach Leo Austria, San Miguel made two Finals appearances and won the 2013 ABL Championship. Reigning ABL Local MVP Bobby Ray Parks Jr.’s father, the late Bobby Parks, was also a San Miguel import during the late 1980s and previously served as the ABL team’s first head coach. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Alab parted ways with former backer Tanduay following reported differences between the rhum company’s management and head coach Jimmy Alapag.Curiously, no Tanduay official was present in the team’s 94-91 overtime win against Chong Son Kung Fu on Wednesday.Alab Pilipinas sits at fourth in the 2018 ASEAN Basketball League with its 7-4 card and will unveil its new name when it returns to action on Sunday against the Singapore Slingers.The transition won’t be much of a problem given a number of players’ familiarity with San Miguel Corporation.Veterans Dondon Hontiveros, Rico Maierhofer, and Josh Urbiztondo all saw action for SMC teams in the PBA, while World imports Renaldo Balkman (San Miguel) and Justin Brownlee (Ginebra) have also previously served as reinforcements in the company’s PBA teams.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netAlab Pilipinas has forged a new partnership with a familiar face in the ASEAN Basketball League.Team owner Charlie Dy announced that the Philippine side will now be backed by San Miguel, marking the conglomerate’s return to the regional league.ADVERTISEMENT NCAA volleyball: Benilde stops Mapua to boost Final Four chances Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises AFP official booed out of forum Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena stinglast_img read more