Young Badgers to rely on senior goaltenders

first_imgUW goaltender Scott Gudmandson will be counted on to anchor a young men\’s hockey team this season.[/media-credit]Mike Eaves lost a lot at the end of last season. The Wisconsin men’s hockey team said goodbye to 345 points produced by 12 players. Seven senior forwards graduated. The guy the players elected as the team’s next captain was one of four underclassmen to leave for the pros early.What’s a head coach to do?Well, as some guy from New Jersey said, you’ve got to hold on to what you’ve got. And in Eaves’ case, that’s two senior goaltenders.Prior to last weekend’s season-opening tournament in St. Louis, Eaves said the Badgers would need to lean on returning senior netminders Scott Gudmandson and Brett Bennett. With 10 freshmen joining the team, Wisconsin wasn’t sure what it was going to get on the offensive side of the puck. It’s too early to say the nine goals UW scored in its two games will allay those worries.“I think coming into the season, we knew that we were going to be a little more defensive-oriented team,” Gudmandson said.Still, young guys will make mistakes. Eaves is hoping the veterans in goal will steady the team when those issues arise.“I think with their experience and their ability to play, they’ll be able to cover up some of the young mistakes we’re going to make,” he said. “That helps us grow as a team, it’s always easier to grow when you don’t get burned on some of the mistakes you do. So hopefully they’ll be able to do that, and this weekend was a pretty good indication.”Entering last season, it was an open competition between Gudmandson and Bennett, a transfer from Boston University. This season, it’s much the same, with Gudmandson getting the start in Friday night’s 4-3 loss and Bennett posting a shutout in UW’s 6-0 win over Holy Cross.Eaves has no problem not having a de facto No. 1 goaltender, praising the efforts of both his netminders.“”They both won big games last year, no question,” Eaves said. “We forget that Brett beat Denver, beat Minnesota.”Last season, Gudmandson was able to take over the starting job, due to Bennett going down with a shoulder injury in December. Gudmandson would get the larger share of starts after the injury, eventually pulling away and becoming the Badgers’ No. 1 guy.While Bennett beat No. 1 Denver in January, making 30 saves in the 4-3 win, he also was pulled in a game against Minnesota-Duluth for allowing two goals in the first 3:12 of play. He didn’t look the same after the injury.“If I had my brace here, I’d let you wear it and you can tell me (how it affected me),” Benentt said. “It’s one of those things where you’ve got to fight through it. You never ever use that as any kind of excuse. I’m just glad to be healthy and looking forward to this season.”Wisconsin rode Gudmandson all through the playoffs, eventually making the national title game. But with a healthy Bennett back in the fold, Eaves wants both his goaltenders to anchor his team.“Last year, it was healthy competition; it brought out the best in both of us,” Gudmandson said. “Hopefully it will do the same again. I know we both want to be that starting guy, I know for sure I want that to be my net. I really don’t want to share it. But I can only control what I can control.”The duo’s numbers last season were good, but not staggering; Gudmandson finished 20-5-4 on the season with a 2.34 goals-against average, while Bennett went 8-6, with a 2.82 GAA. By comparison, 2010 WCHA player of the year Marc Cheverie had a 2.08 GAA and six shutouts for Denver.Many critics pointed to Wisconsin’s goaltending as the one weakness in the 2009-2010 team, especially during its NCAA run. But the experience Gudmandson and Bennett gained last year is crucial in fueling the expectations of the two this season.“You can’t put a price on that,” Eaves said. “That’s why it’s important they play well for us, because that will help us get off to the kind of start that will help us in the long run.”“I think it’s huge,” Gudmandson agreed. “You can’t take experience away; it’s something that’s invaluable.”And with experience comes confidence. Last year, the confidence came from an explosive offense that was shut out just three times and one of the most talented defensive corps in the nation.This season, that confidence might have to start at the other end of the ice. With a young team, it will be up to the guys trying to stop goals to keep the Badgers on course.“I think confidence for a goaltender is like for a quarterback in football. The whole team, they have to have confidence in the quarterback in football, and if they don’t, things are going to break down, Gudmandson said. “It’s the same thing in hockey, the whole team’s got to have confidence in the goalie, they’ve got to know he’s going to make saves back there, otherwise things are going to break down up front.”Serving as the go-to guys this season doesn’t faze either goaltender. While the Badgers’ offense was able to mask any deficiencies in net by scoring four goals a game last season, it could be very different this year.But that’s just fine by the both of them.“Me and Scott talked about it. We know that we’re going to have to be really important to this team if we’re going to do something special this year,” Bennett said. “We’re ready to shoulder the load.”last_img read more

Indonesia set one week out from 2018 Asian Games

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Indonesia suffered its deadliest terror attack in more than 10 years in May when suicide bombers killed 13 people in the nation’s second-biggest city Surabaya.Police say they have been rounding up terror suspects and petty criminals in a pre-Games crackdown.Haze headacheHaze from forest fires in Sumatra remains another potential headache for events in Palembang.But Indonesian meteorologists have been monitoring weather conditions closely and extinguishing hotspots.“We have been conducting weather modification efforts since May, including cloud seeding and water bombing,” Hary Tirto Djatmiko, spokesman for national meteorology, climatology and geophysics agency, told AFP.The Games’ preparation has not come without hiccups, however.Indonesians have made a mockery of the Jakarta government’s decision to cover a toxic river near the athletes’ village with black nylon mesh over fears it will be an eyesore at the showpiece event.Similarly, the city council was ridiculed for erecting Games’ banners with spelling mistakes.Some social media users have also questioned why city sanitation workers — and not artists — were chosen to paint Games’ murals in parts of the city. Palembang briefly made headlines last month when irate football fans ripped plastic seats from the stands after the home team lost and hurled them onto the pitch at a stadium scheduled to host the event.Still, excitement is building ahead of the Games.“The Asian Games atmosphere is quite obvious here in Palembang, we have murals everywhere and our LRT (light rail) is already running,” Palembang resident Nicky Anggraini told AFP.“I’m definitely going to watch the Games, I can’t wait,” she added.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Despite worries about Jakarta’s notorious traffic congestion, authorities say the implementation of an odd-even license plate system is already bearing results.“Traveling speed has improved by almost 60 percent, while travel time has improved 43 percent from 15.56 minutes per km to 8.86 minute per km,” Jakarta’s transportation agency chief, Andri Yansyah, told AFP.Athletes and officials will travel on dedicated road lanes and schools will be closed to take the daily commute of millions of pupils out of the equation.When Indonesia last hosted a major sports event, the 2011 SEA Games, two people died in a stadium stampede at the football final in Jakarta.In a bid to safeguard the event, some 40,000 troops and police officers will be deployed in Jakarta and Palembang.ADVERTISEMENT Indonesia started with less time than most host countries after it agreed to hold the Games when Vietnam pulled out.However, officials say they are ready to take the Games in their stride.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’“There are no problems for the preparation so far, even if we have problems we will solve them right there right then,” chief organizer Erick Thohir told journalists Thursday.Seventy percent of tickets have been sold for the opening ceremony in the capital Jakarta next Saturday, he added. 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