Young Badgers to rely on senior goaltenders

first_imgUW goaltender Scott Gudmandson will be counted on to anchor a young men\’s hockey team this season.[/media-credit]Mike Eaves lost a lot at the end of last season. The Wisconsin men’s hockey team said goodbye to 345 points produced by 12 players. Seven senior forwards graduated. The guy the players elected as the team’s next captain was one of four underclassmen to leave for the pros early.What’s a head coach to do?Well, as some guy from New Jersey said, you’ve got to hold on to what you’ve got. And in Eaves’ case, that’s two senior goaltenders.Prior to last weekend’s season-opening tournament in St. Louis, Eaves said the Badgers would need to lean on returning senior netminders Scott Gudmandson and Brett Bennett. With 10 freshmen joining the team, Wisconsin wasn’t sure what it was going to get on the offensive side of the puck. It’s too early to say the nine goals UW scored in its two games will allay those worries.“I think coming into the season, we knew that we were going to be a little more defensive-oriented team,” Gudmandson said.Still, young guys will make mistakes. Eaves is hoping the veterans in goal will steady the team when those issues arise.“I think with their experience and their ability to play, they’ll be able to cover up some of the young mistakes we’re going to make,” he said. “That helps us grow as a team, it’s always easier to grow when you don’t get burned on some of the mistakes you do. So hopefully they’ll be able to do that, and this weekend was a pretty good indication.”Entering last season, it was an open competition between Gudmandson and Bennett, a transfer from Boston University. This season, it’s much the same, with Gudmandson getting the start in Friday night’s 4-3 loss and Bennett posting a shutout in UW’s 6-0 win over Holy Cross.Eaves has no problem not having a de facto No. 1 goaltender, praising the efforts of both his netminders.“”They both won big games last year, no question,” Eaves said. “We forget that Brett beat Denver, beat Minnesota.”Last season, Gudmandson was able to take over the starting job, due to Bennett going down with a shoulder injury in December. Gudmandson would get the larger share of starts after the injury, eventually pulling away and becoming the Badgers’ No. 1 guy.While Bennett beat No. 1 Denver in January, making 30 saves in the 4-3 win, he also was pulled in a game against Minnesota-Duluth for allowing two goals in the first 3:12 of play. He didn’t look the same after the injury.“If I had my brace here, I’d let you wear it and you can tell me (how it affected me),” Benentt said. “It’s one of those things where you’ve got to fight through it. You never ever use that as any kind of excuse. I’m just glad to be healthy and looking forward to this season.”Wisconsin rode Gudmandson all through the playoffs, eventually making the national title game. But with a healthy Bennett back in the fold, Eaves wants both his goaltenders to anchor his team.“Last year, it was healthy competition; it brought out the best in both of us,” Gudmandson said. “Hopefully it will do the same again. I know we both want to be that starting guy, I know for sure I want that to be my net. I really don’t want to share it. But I can only control what I can control.”The duo’s numbers last season were good, but not staggering; Gudmandson finished 20-5-4 on the season with a 2.34 goals-against average, while Bennett went 8-6, with a 2.82 GAA. By comparison, 2010 WCHA player of the year Marc Cheverie had a 2.08 GAA and six shutouts for Denver.Many critics pointed to Wisconsin’s goaltending as the one weakness in the 2009-2010 team, especially during its NCAA run. But the experience Gudmandson and Bennett gained last year is crucial in fueling the expectations of the two this season.“You can’t put a price on that,” Eaves said. “That’s why it’s important they play well for us, because that will help us get off to the kind of start that will help us in the long run.”“I think it’s huge,” Gudmandson agreed. “You can’t take experience away; it’s something that’s invaluable.”And with experience comes confidence. Last year, the confidence came from an explosive offense that was shut out just three times and one of the most talented defensive corps in the nation.This season, that confidence might have to start at the other end of the ice. With a young team, it will be up to the guys trying to stop goals to keep the Badgers on course.“I think confidence for a goaltender is like for a quarterback in football. The whole team, they have to have confidence in the quarterback in football, and if they don’t, things are going to break down, Gudmandson said. “It’s the same thing in hockey, the whole team’s got to have confidence in the goalie, they’ve got to know he’s going to make saves back there, otherwise things are going to break down up front.”Serving as the go-to guys this season doesn’t faze either goaltender. While the Badgers’ offense was able to mask any deficiencies in net by scoring four goals a game last season, it could be very different this year.But that’s just fine by the both of them.“Me and Scott talked about it. We know that we’re going to have to be really important to this team if we’re going to do something special this year,” Bennett said. “We’re ready to shoulder the load.”last_img read more

Earthquake advisory warning in effect until Tuesday

first_imgDesign by Katlyn LeeThe California Office of Emergency Services issued an earthquake advisory warning for Southern California on Friday in response to an earthquake swarm in the Brawley Seismic Zone near the Salton Sea. Residents of the area should be on heightened alert for the possibility of a major earthquake until Tuesday, the report said. According to the U.S. Geological Services, more than 140 small earthquakes between 1.4 and 4.3 in magnitude have hit the Bombay Beach area since Monday. The USGS said that the chances of a magnitude 7 or above earthquake are between 0.006 percent and 0.2 percent, with the chances decreasing over the course of the week.“California is earthquake country. We must always be prepared and not let our guard down,” OES Director Mark Ghilarducci said to CBS. “The threat of an earthquake on the San Andreas Fault hasn’t gone away, so this is another important opportunity for us to revisit our emergency plans and learn what steps you need to take if a significant earthquake hits.”The advisory was issued to residents and officials in Ventura, San Diego, San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange, Los Angeles, Kern and Imperial counties. If a large earthquake does occur, it could directly impact USC.Many native residents of Southern California remember the effects of the Northridge earthquake in 1994. At 6.7 magnitude, office buildings, parking structures and parts of major highways collapsed, with some apartment buildings sustaining irreparable damage.Since then, there have been numerous smaller earthquakes that have left minimal impact in the area. Carin Chin, a junior majoring in NGOs and social change, said that the frequency at which the quakes occur has desensitized her.“Having lived in California for 20 years, my view on earthquakes has definitely been numbed, since they happen so often in small amounts,” Chin said.While there may be a lack of concern on the part of native Southern California residents, students who are not from the area and not used to the frequent quakes, may have more reason to be alarmed. Anisha Mandhania, a graduate student at the Gould School of Law, said that her own exposure to earthquakes only served to heighten her awareness of the need for earthquake preparedness, rather than dampen it. “I experienced this extreme earthquake back in India some 10 or 15 years back,” Mandhania said. “It just happened all of a sudden, and afterwards there were smaller tremors for one month or so.”For Mandhania, this experience solidified her belief that the California advisory is an important step in ensuring that everyone remains safe.The Southern California Earthquake Center, which is headquartered at USC, researches earthquakes and looks for new ways to be better prepared in the event of a big one. USC also participates in earthquake preparedness drills at both the University Park Campus and the Health Sciences Campus.last_img read more

Proud To Be Indian | ‘Vision, not visibility, needed to succeed’, says Dapran Inani as he embarks on a journey to become first visually impaired Indian grandmaster

first_img Narayan R WATCH US LIVE Further, Darpan gave much of the the credit for his success to his parents, and also felt that he didn’t fail in his journey only because he knew it’d be tough, something which a number of people fail to deal with. Session ID: 2020-09-09:add21da0d42a81ea481d1c3d Player Element ID: video_player_5f578f143b726 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Duration 0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackQuality LevelsFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Error Code: PLAYER_ERR_DOMAIN_RESTRICTED Vision is needed, not visibility, to succeed — This was the following message put forward by Darpan Inani, one of India’s leading chess players and the only visually impaired Indian to win an international event in the sport.Speaking exclusively to Republic TV on the 70th Republic Day, the 24-year-old stated that any individual, even though he may be limited by his vision, can succeed if he has an imagination.  “It requires imagination, and that is what is meant by vision. Visibility is not required and if you have the visualization ability, you can play the game,” when asked how he manages to play a sport without having the sight to see. “My parents have been the backbone always, and they have supported meticulously in whatever I do. They leave the decision making to me, and once I take it, they support me in every endeavor that I venture in. It’s the mindset (when asked why people give up). At times, we tend to give up or feel depressed because we expect life should be easy….Whenever we are seeing the road is not easy, we tend to give up,” the 24-year-old said. Last Updated: 26th January, 2019 19:01 IST Proud To Be Indian | ‘Vision, Not Visibility, Needed To Succeed’, Says Dapran Inani As He Embarks On A Journey To Become First Visually Impaired Indian Grandmaster The chess master, who intends to become the first visually impaired Indian grandmaster, also mentioned that chess is the only sport which lets him compete with others on an equal level “There is no other game which gives me the opportunity to compete with the sighted people on an equal footing.This is the only game where I can compete with the sighted people and beat them. It requires no modification of rules, and I can play at par with them,” Darpan added. “My life changing story? When I was at eight years, I started my formal school from third standard. I was admitted to a normal school and that was the life changing moment for me because integrating with the mainstream, it changed my life entirely. It was definitely a challenge.  A lot of schools at that point refused to admit me or they were apprehensive about how will we cope up or how will we teach him.” LIVE TV FOLLOW US First Published: 26th January, 2019 14:31 IST Written By The chess master, who intends to become the first visually impaired Indian grandmaster, also mentioned that chess is the only sport which lets him compete with others on an equal level. COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Another major topic which he enlightened on was the incident which changed him. When quipped if there was any particular moment which brought he change in his life, he said,last_img read more