Sony is mulling the launch of an internet pay TV s

first_imgSony is mulling the launch of an internet pay TV service, according to press reports.The TV manufacturer is considering launching a pay TV service in the US and has reached out to companies including NBC Universal, News Corp and Discovery, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal, citing sources familiar with the situation. According to the Journal, Sony could look to offer niche channels rather than bundles that competed head on with pay TV rivals.last_img

Telenors Fornebu HQ Telenor Satellite Broadcastin

first_imgTelenor’s Fornebu HQTelenor Satellite Broadcasting successfully launched its new Thor 7 satellite from the Guiana Space Centre in French Guiana yesterday.The satellite launched on board an Ariane 5 launcher and passed into geostationary transfer orbit where it will now undergo in-orbit testing.The satellite is due to start delivering DTH services in six weeks, with its high-throughput satellite (HTS) Ka-band services to be ready for full commercial service in the fourth quarter.“From its 1° West location, the Thor 7 satellite will provide growth capacity for DTH services across Central and Eastern Europe and deliver optimal satellite coverage across Europe’s business shipping lanes for the provision of maritime VSAT services,” said Telenor Satellite Broadcasting CEO, Morten Tengs.The satellite has both a Ku-band and a HTS Ka-band payload. The Ku-band payload will deliver TV services in Central and Eastern Europe and the HTS Ka-band payload has been designed for the mobility VSAT market.last_img read more

Mental health care for elderly comes into focus

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDApr 10 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)According to a new study self-harm is becoming a major health issue among the elderly. This is bringing into focus the issue of mental health among the elderly. The results of the study titled, “Self-harm in older adults: systematic review,” were published in the latest issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry.The researchers have found that from 40 different studies (including a total of 62,755 older adults), that the self harm rates were around 65 per 100,000 people. The risk of repeat harm, attempts to suicide and successful suicide are also greater among the elderly, the study finds. Up until now the focus of mental health research has primarily been on adolescents and youth self harm and suicide. This meta analysis shows that the problem is not confined to younger age groups.The researchers explain that in 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) had found that suicide rates were highest among people over the age of 70 across the world. The Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP) had also found that around 40 percent of the elderly attending GP clinics suffered from some form of mental ailment. In care homes this number was around 60 percent and in hospitals around 50 percent says the RCP. As the aging population increases in proportion, there is also a rise in mental health problems says the Mental Health Foundation. Around £11.5m was allotted to these organizations to combat mental health problems among elderly.Some of the key factors in self harm among elderly include age, previous history of self harm, other physical ailments, other psychiatric ailments and isolation. There is inadequate access to help says the RCP with 85 percent of the elderly with depression receiving “no help from the NHS”. Symptoms of depression in the elderly are often attributed to old age rather than a clinical problem. Medication prescription rates are also higher among the elderly. This means that they are also at risk of overdosing and poisoning.Authors Isabela Troya and colleagues conclude in their study, “Self-harm in older adults has distinct characteristics that should be explored to improve management and care… Given the frequent contact with health services, an opportunity exists for detection and prevention of self-harm and suicide in this population.”Mental health services ‘broken and heading for crisis’Mental health care staff are quitting the NHS for better paid and less stressful jobs says a report from UNISON.The general perception among these workers is their inability to deliver quality medical help to their patients which is affecting their own mental health. The survey called Mental Health Matters looked at over 600 employees across the UK working with the NHS. Related StoriesEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsInternational study aims to more accurately describe mental health disordersIU-connected startup working to enable precision medicine for mental health issues, chronic painQuitting smoking could help people with severe mental illness finds studyA new study showed the effects of quitting smoking on severe mental illness. The study titled, “Smoking cessation for people with severe mental illness (SCIMITAR+): a pragmatic randomized control” was published in the Lancet Psychiatry.Authors Professor Simon Gilbody and colleagues found that smoking was thrice as common among people with schizophrenia and severe mental illness. In this trial they included heavy smokers with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The adult patients were from 16 primary care and 21 community-based mental health sites in the United Kingdom and smoked at least five cigarettes per day. They included a total of 526 participants between October 2015 to December 2016.They were divided randomly into two groups – smoking cessation intervention using medication and counselling (265 participants) and usual care (261 participants). Results showed that those on the intervention quit more than those on usual care. The effects were most pronounced at 6 months of the intervention but the effects seemed to wane off at the end of a year. The authors conclude that more sustained efforts are needed for smoking cessation among the mental ill.The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme. The results show that tightening of the budget and rising stress are driving these workers away from the NHS. Sara Gorton, UNISON’s Head of Health, said, “Staff in mental health services are facing burnout as a result of years of underfunding. It’s no wonder so many are thinking of finding better-paid and less-stressful jobs elsewhere. If this situation continues, the NHS risks losing staff who are passionate about making a difference. What’s needed is proper investment so staff can deliver the quality of care to those in need.”last_img read more

Did We Mishear Neil Armstrongs Famous First Words on the Moon

first_img This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Oregon On July 20, 1969, an estimated 650 million people watched in suspense as Neil Armstrong descended a ladder towards the surface of the Moon. As he took his first steps, he uttered words that would be written into history books for generations to come: “That’s one small step for man. One giant leap for mankind.” Or at least that’s how the media reported his words.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65950-neil-armstrong-first-words-on-moon.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  But Armstrong insisted that he actually said, “That’s one small step for a man.” In fact, in the official transcript of the Moon landing mission, NASA transcribes the quote as “that’s one small step for (a) man.” As a linguist, I’m fascinated by mistakes between what people say and what people hear. In fact, I recently conducted a study on ambiguous speech, using Armstrong’s famous quote to try to figure out why and how we successfully understand speech most of the time, but also make the occasional mistake. Our extraordinary speech-processing abilities Despite confusion over Armstrong’s words, speakers and listeners have a remarkable ability to agree on what is said and what is heard. When we talk, we formulate a thought, retrieve words from memory and move our mouths to produce sound. We do this quickly, producing, in English, around five syllables every second. The process for listeners is equally complex and speedy. We hear sounds, which we separate into speech and non-speech information, combine the speech sounds into words, and determine the meanings of these words. Again, this happens nearly instantaneously, and errors rarely occur. These processes are even more extraordinary when you think more closely about the properties of speech. Unlike writing, speech doesn’t have spaces between words. When people speak, there are typically very few pauses within a sentence. Yet listeners have little trouble determining word boundaries in real time. This is because there are little cues — like pitch and rhythm — that indicate when one word stops and the next begins. But problems in speech perception can arise when those kinds of cues are missing, especially when pitch and rhythm are used for non-linguistic purposes, like in music. This is one reason why misheard song lyrics — called “mondegreens” — are common. When singing or rapping, a lot of the speech cues we usually use are shifted to accommodate the song’s beat, which can end up jamming our default perception process. But it’s not just lyrics that are misheard. This can happen in everyday speech, and some have wondered if this is what happened in the case of Neil Armstrong. Studying Armstrong’s mixed signals Over the years, researchers have tried to comb the audio files of Armstrong’s famous words, with mixed results. Some have suggested that Armstrong definitely produced the infamous “a,” while others maintain that it’s unlikely or too difficult to tell. But the original sound file was recorded 50 years ago, and the quality is pretty poor. So can we ever really know whether Neil Armstrong uttered that little “a”? Perhaps not. But in a recent study, my colleagues and I tried to get to the bottom of this. First, we explored how similar the speech signals are when a speaker intends to say “for” or “for a.” That is, could a production of “for” be consistent with the sound waves, or acoustics, of “for a,” and vice-versa? So we examined nearly 200 productions of “for” and 200 productions of “for a.” We found that the acoustics of the productions of each of these tokens were nearly identical. In other words, the sound waves produced by “He bought it for a school” and “He bought one for school” are strikingly similar. But this doesn’t tell us what Armstrong actually said on that July day in 1969. So we wanted to see if listeners sometimes miss little words like “a” in contexts like Armstrong’s phrase. We wondered whether “a” was always perceived by listeners, even when it was clearly produced. And we found that, in several studies, listeners often misheard short words, like “a.” This is especially true when the speaking rate was as slow as Armstrong’s. In addition, we were able to manipulate whether or not people heard these short words just by altering the rate of speech. So perhaps this was a perfect storm of conditions for listeners to misperceive the intended meaning of this famous quote. The case of the missing “a” is one example of the challenges in producing and understanding speech. Nonetheless, we typically perceive and produce speech quickly, easily and without conscious effort. A better understanding of this process can be especially useful when trying to help people with speech or hearing impairments. And it allows researchers to better understand how these skills are learned by adults trying to acquire a new language, which can, in turn, help language learners develop more efficient strategies. Fifty years ago, humanity was changed when Neil Armstrong took those first steps on the Moon. But he probably didn’t realize that his famous first words could also help us better understand how humans communicate. [Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter to get insight each day]last_img read more

Woman Dies After Being Impaled by Reusable Metal Straw

first_img Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoEditorChoice.comSee What The World’s Largest Dog Looks LikeEditorChoice.comUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndo A woman in England died after falling onto a reusable metal straw, which pierced her head, and the tragic accident has renewed debate over bans on plastic straws, according to news reports. The woman, 60-year-old Elena Struthers-Gardner, was carrying a glass with a 10-inch-long stainless-steel straw when she fell and the straw impaled her eye, causing fatal brain injuries, according to the Daily Echo, a British newspaper. Struthers-Gardner had scoliosis, or a sideways curvature of the spine, which made her prone to falls. Struthers-Gardner died in November, and a coroner’s report on her death was released this week, according to The New York Times. The report called her death an accident.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65925-metal-straw-death.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Several U.S. cities and states have already banned plastic straws to reduce the plastic entering the environment, and a similar ban is set to take effect in England in April 2020, the Times reported. But the bans have sparked concern among people with disabilities and their advocates, who say the bans make straws unavailable for those with disabilities who rely on straws to drink, according to NPR. In addition, the rigidity of reusable metal straws may pose safety risks. “I just feel that in the hands of mobility-challenged people like Elena [Struthers-Gardner], or children, or even able-bodied people losing their footing, these [straws] are so long and very strong,” Mandy Struthers-Gardner, Elena’s wife, said in a statement, the Daily Echo reported. “Even if they don’t end a life, they can be very dangerous.” In 2016, Starbucks recalled 2.5 million stainless-steel straws due to reports of young children who experienced mouth lacerations from using the straws, according to U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Brendan Allen, the assistant coroner involved in Struthers-Gardner’s case, also warned about the potential dangers of metal straws. “Clearly, great care should be taken when using these metal straws. There is no give in them at all,” Allen said. He added that in this case, the metal straw may have been particularly hazardous because it was used with a lid that prevented the straw from moving. “It seems to me these metal straws should not be used with any form of lid that holds them in place,” Allen said. “It seems the main problem here is if the lid hadn’t been in place the straw would have moved away.” In Images: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Top 10 Craziest Environmental Ideas In Photos: World’s 10 Most Polluted Placeslast_img read more

Monsoon session of Parliament to begin from July 18Monsoon session of Parliament

first_imgPublished on SHARE SHARE EMAIL parliament SHARE June 25, 2018center_img COMMENT COMMENTS The Monsoon session of Parliament is set to begin on July 18 and end on August 10 with the triple talaq bill among the legislative items topping the government’s agenda.The session will have nearly 18 sittings, Parliamentary Affairs Minister Ananth Kumar told reporters here.The Cabinet Committee of Parliamentary Affairs (CCPA), chaired by Home Minister Rajnath Singh, met here today to recommend the dates. President Ram Nath Kovind will now formally convene the session.“We seek the support and cooperation of opposition parties. There are many important items on the legislative agenda that the government wants to take up in the Monsoon session,” Kumar said.More than six ordinances will be taken up, he said.The triple talaq bill, which has been passed by the Lok Sabha and is pending in the Rajya Sabha, will be among the top priorities of the government, the minister added.He said the government will push for constitutional status for the National Commission for OBCs. The National Commission for Medical Education Bill and the transgender bill will also be taken up.With P J Kurien’s term ending at the end of this month, the election to choose the deputy chairman for the Rajya Sabha will be taken up in this session, Kumar said.last_img read more