The Horrible Right Now Nature of Email

first_imgThe person that delivers your mail pulls up to your house. They find your mail, and they put it in your mailbox. Then they drive to the next house. They won’t return to your house with more mail for 24 hours.You want to know what they left in your mailbox. You rush out to the street and open the box, and you anxiously bring the mail inside. You hope there is a check in the mail. You hope there is something interesting or worthwhile. Instead, there are two bills and five pieces of junk mail, nothing worthwhile.Two minutes later, the mailperson backs up their truck. They forgot something. They open your mailbox and place an envelope inside. You rush out to see what treasure awaits you. Another bill. Nothing novel, but at least your curiosity has been served.The mail is delivered once a day. You only have to open the box and process your mail once a day. Most of what shows up isn’t worth your time or attention. A good deal of it is routine maintenance, things like bills and statements that, while important, aren’t anything that needs your attention now. Having learned this over time, you are not so enthusiastic about physical mail anymore.Right NowImagine another scenario. Imagine that your mail delivery person parks their truck right in front of your mailbox. About once every 10 minutes, the mail carrier opens your mailbox and inserts one new envelope. Over the course of an hour, you receive 6 new pieces of mail. Would you walk to the mailbox every ten minutes to retrieve your mail, knowing that there isn’t likely to be anything that needs your attention there? Or would you wait a couple of hours while you do you work before you go and pick up your mail.This second scenario is exactly how email works. When you leave your inbox or web browser open, you are inviting interruptions. You are allowing yourself to be distracted, knowing that most of what comes into your inbox doesn’t require your attention, and knowing that your most important work isn’t going to be found in your inbox.The “right now” nature of email is that everything that enters your inbox is treated as being equally important. That newsletter subscription you keep meaning to unsubscribe from is at the very top of your list, prominently on display as the very first thing you have to look at. Beneath that are two news alerts you subscribed to. Now you know the Federal Reserve didn’t raise interest rates, and some team from Cleveland is getting things done. The fourth email in your list is a “for your information” email from a coworker who wants to make sure everyone on the distribution chain is aware that there is “no change” on the status of a project.Right now, you could be doing meaningful work. Right now, you could be face-to-face with a client, a prospect, or a co-worker getting things done. Right now you could be making phone calls to people who need your help or people who could help you. Most of the results you produce aren’t going to be produced in your inbox.Turn your browser off. Close your inbox. Do meaningful work for 90 minutes. Take 15 minutes to stand up, stretch, drink some water, and then check your email to see if anything needs your attention. This means you will check your email 4 times over the course of an 8 hour day. You can do excellent, meaningful, on purpose, intentional work in blocks of 90 minutes.last_img read more

In Gurugram, Independents add spice to poll

first_imgKusheshwar Bhagat, 48, has been running a ‘pav bhaji’ stall off Jharsa Road in Part-II of Sector 15 here for more than a decade now. But don’t mistake him for an ordinary street food vendor by the roadside.One of the seven Independent contestants in the fray for the Lok Sabha election in Gurugram, Mr. Bhagat is contesting for the third consecutive time from this parliamentary constituency. He fought two Vidhan Sabha elections earlier. But could never save his deposit.Voters disillusioned“I polled 7,821 votes in 2014 LS election, the highest so far in the four elections,” says Mr. Bhagat, who has moveable assets of around ₹2.5 lakh, besides a Nano car and a house in Delhi. “The voters seem disillusioned with all parties this time. I hope to get around 3 lakh votes… they will vote me to power one day,” says Mr. Bhagat, contesting on the plank of health and education to all.Like him, affordable health and education, development, agrarian crisis, corruption and unemployment are high on the agenda of the Independent candidates in Gurugram. Pawan Kumar, 34, a resident of Gurugram, says he decided to fight the election to raise his voice against lack of jobs and the plight of government schools. “The local youth are not getting employed in the industries in the area. The government schools are in a pitiable condition. Farmers are in distress and the soldiers are dying,” says Mr. Pawan, a graduate, claiming the support of a dozen villages. He says his election symbol, a bucket, will help him strike an instant chord with the voters. He hopes to win with a margin of around one lakh votes.A mini-worldBikaner’s Virender, who claims to have contested five Rajasthan Assembly elections, says that Gurugram is a mini-world with people having come and settled from across the globe. He wants to make it a truly “Millennium City”.Sudesh Kumar of Pataudi, a Scheduled Caste, took the plunge to prepare for the Assembly election later this year. Self-employed, Mr. Sudesh says this Lok Sabha election is a “mock test” for him as he wants to acquaint himself with the election process.Most of these Independent candidates, coming from humble backgrounds, are contesting on shoestring budgets with little money to spare for the canvassing. Mr. Pawan says he is yet to get his campaign material printed and has sought financial support from his father and relatives. He carries his visiting card along and distributes it during his door-to-door campaign.Mr. Bhagat says he spent around ₹15,000 on his campaign in the previous election, but this time he is pinning his hopes on the free publicity through the media. “Every day an article is carried on me in the newspapers. It is enough publicity.I need not spend much on the campaign this time.” says Kusheshwar.Mr. Virender says that he will reach the voters through door-to-door campaign, distributing handbills and send text messages. Mr. Sudesh is active on all popular social media platforms, including Instagram and Facebook, and updates all his canvassing pictures online for the maximum reach.last_img read more

Veer Savarkar’s portrait unveiled in Goa House

first_imgGoa Chief Minister Pramod Sawant reiterated Veer Savarkar’s contribution to the freedom movement here on Tuesday after unveiling his portrait in the Goa Assembly.“His contribution to the freedom struggle should reach people. The tortures endured by Veer Savarkar in the Andaman prison have been forgotten. People should read his autobiography,” said Mr. Sawant.“We did not do an official programme. We just installed a portrait. The new generation should learn from these leaders, they should not forget them,” said Mr. Sawant.Replying to questions from presspersons on the sidelines of the function, Mr. Sawant said he would allocate more portfolios to Ministers soon. “The code of conduct has just been withdrawn. After administrative issues are looked into, portfolios will be distributed as soon as possible,” he said.The monsoon session of the Assembly would be held towards the end of June in which the budget would be ptresented, Mr. Sawant said. He said all ministers in Goa have been invited for Prime Minister’s swearing-in in New Delhi on May 30.last_img read more