101 arrested during 4-day crime assault

first_imgLANCASTER – Law enforcement officials are calling a four-day saturation patrol of central Lancaster that concluded Friday the opening salvo of an effort to eradicate the Antelope Valley’s streets of criminal street gangs. The saturation patrol produced 101 arrests – 38 for felonies and 63 arrests for misdemeanors – and another 57 citations, Palmdale sheriff’s station Lt. Bobby Denham said Monday. Of those arrested, 56 had outstanding warrants, and five were known gang members, Denham said. Denham said four arrests were for illegal firearms possession, and 26 involved illegal narcotics possession. Four firearms were recovered, including one shotgun. “The number of deputies on the streets are there to send a message to gang members that we’re here and we will continue to be here,” Denham said. “At the same time we want the public to know that we in law enforcement will do all we can to reduce gangs and crime throughout the entire Antelope Valley.” gideon.rubin@dailynews.com (661) 267-7802 Some 60 sheriff’s deputies flooded a roughly 31/2 -square-mile area from Avenues H to J-8 between 20th Streets East and West most of last week in an unprecedented effort that will continue indefinitely, law enforcement officials say. About 40 out-of-area deputies were summoned to Lancaster, joining existing Community Oriented Policing and High Impact Team units assigned to proactively pursue criminal activity. Lancaster residents say it was hard not to notice the increased law enforcement presence. “Everybody’s talking about it, good guys, bad guys, everybody knows about it,” said Lancaster resident Rami Darghalli, who owns Bob’s Market on Avenue I in Lancaster. “It won’t solve the problem completely, but I think it can help. They need to do it more often.” Denham said similar saturation patrols are planned for Palmdale and surrounding unincorporated regions. last_img read more

Ayesha Curry confirms she had cosmetic surgery after breastfeeding Riley

first_imgClick HERE if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device.One of the reasons that Ayesha Curry may be as big a star as her Golden State Warriors husband is that she’s willing to sometimes let her fans in on personal details about her life as a celebrity chef, entrepreneur, wife and mom.But the wife of Stephen Curry never comes across as just seeking social media popularity. The 29-year-old Alamo resident, who has said she always aspired to be a “role model” for others, seems …last_img

No-Till field day Sept. 2

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Soil health and water quality will be two focal points of the 2015 Ohio No-till Field Day on Sept. 2.The event will take place from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Dan Batdorf farm, 9291 Rt. 48 (North), Covington, in western Miami County, and will feature a variety of exhibitors and speakers on a wide range of no-till topics.Attending the field day will be Jason Weller, chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service in Washington, D.C., who will speak briefly about his agency’s emphasis on soil health and plans to attend the event all day.Among the presentations will be “Microbes at Work” by David Lamm, USDA-NRCS, Greensboro, N.C., who will focus on an examination of the below-ground benefits of cover crops, including how microbes can improve soil quality.“No-till and cover crops can help emulate the ecosystem functions of natural prairies,” Lamm said. “Prairies and prairie soils flourished with a diversity of plants, a minimum amount of disturbance, and living roots that grew throughout most of the year.”No one species of cover crop can deliver all the advantages multiple cover crops deliver in combination, he said.“Some fix nitrogen, some are very good at scavenging leftover nitrogen in the soil, some have deep roots that extend benefits deeper into the soil profile, and still others help control specific weeds or attract beneficial insects,” Lamm said.Also presenting will be Kevin King, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, and Glen Arnold, Ohio State University Extension field specialist, who will discuss “Water Quality and Manure Application.” OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.Arnold will describe how to use a drag hose to inject manure between cornrows up to the V3 growth stage in order to extend the spring manure application timeframe.“Commercial applicators are typically shut down from late April, when corn planting starts, until after wheat harvest in July,” Arnold said. “This system can add about a month after corn is planted in a field to apply liquid manure. Injecting it is better for water quality than spreading on the surface.”Also during the event:* Don Reicosky, USDA-ARS, Morris, Minnesota (retired), will speak on “No-Till, Cover Crops and Carbon: Perfect Trio for Soil Health.”* Gypsoil, one of the event’s sponsors, will demonstrate how to haul, load and spread gypsum.* David Brandt, a no-till farmer, will show how to establish cover crops.* Lamm will speak with Rafiq Islam, soil scientist with the college’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, on the below-ground benefits of cover crops.* There will also be demonstrations of planter and drill setup and soil pit observations of rooting, earthworms and soil structure.The full agenda, registration information and other details are available online atfabe.osu.edu/notill.Registration by Aug. 20 is $40 payable to Ohio No-till Council at Miami SWCD, 1330 N. County Road 25A, Suite C, Troy, Ohio, 45373. On-site registration of $65 is also available.The event is sponsored by the Ohio No-Till Council with support from the All-Ohio Chapter of Soil and Water Conservation Service, OSU Extension, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, NRCS-USDA, SWCDs in Miami and Darke counties, Ohio’s Country Journal, Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Ohio Soybean Council.last_img read more

Drainline Heat Exchangers

first_imgAlex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also recently created the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. No moving parts, nothing to wear outThe beauty of drainline heat exchangers is that there are no moving parts, nothing the wear out, and nothing to get clogged. Only fresh water goes through the small-diameter supply pipes; any hair or other materials pass through a standard, smooth drain pipe. Several versionsThere are four manufacturers of drainline heat exchangers that I’m aware of: Vasile’s original company, WaterFilm Energy of Medford, New York, and three Canadian companies: EcoInnovation Technologies of St-Louis-de-Gonzague, Quebec, which makes the Eco-GFX; ReTherm Energy Systems of Summerside, Prince Edward Island; and RenewAbility Energy of Kitchener, Ontario, which makes the Power-Pipe.Most of these have a single 1/2-inch copper pipe coiled around a length (typically three to five feet) of 2-inch or 3-inch diameter drain pipe.The Power-Pipe is a little different than the others. It has a header that splits the supply pipe into four smaller, square-cross-section pipes that provide more surface area for heat transfer.Most of these manufacturers offer various lengths and diameters of drainline and can accommodate different supply pipe diameters. GBA Encyclopedia: Drain-water heat recoveryGBA Product Guide: Domestic Water Heat ReclaimersQ&A: Plumbing question – Domestic Water Heat Reclaimer CostInstalled in a new home, drainline heat exchangers typically cost $500 to $800 (including installation). Costs in multifamily buildings should be lower. In some states there are rebates available for such systems. How a drainline heat exchanger worksThe process is pretty simple. A special section of copper drainpipe is installed beneath a shower (typically the largest hot water use in a home) or other hot wastewater source. This section of drainpipe has smaller-diameter copper piping wrapped tightly around it. The cold-water supply pipe leading into the water heater is diverted so that it flows through the small-diameter copper pipe. RELATED ARTICLES When hot water is being pulled from the water heater to supply the shower, the water going into the water heater is preheated by the wastewater going down the shower drain. If it’s a tankless — rather than storage — water heater, the incoming water temperature will be higher, so less energy will be required to get it up to the needed delivery temperature — thus saving energy (though the tankless water heater has to be thermostatically controlled and, thus, able to deal with inlet water of varying temperature).The man who invented the drainwater heater exchanger, Carmine Vasile, called the product a GFX, for “gravity-film exchange,” recognizing that water going down a vertical pipe forms a film that clings to the inner walls of the pipe where the heat can effectively be transferred through the copper to the supply water. Over the past few weeks I’ve written about various strategies to produce hot water efficiently. We’ve seen that tankless water heaters are more efficient than storage water heaters (though are not without their drawbacks), and we’ve learned that heat-pump water heaters produce two to three times as much heat per unit of electricity consumed as electric water heaters that rely on electric resistance heat.But the unfortunate reality is that even with the most efficient methods of generating hot water, we still lose the vast majority of that heat down the drain. Domestic hot water is a once-through product. I’ve seen estimates that 90% of the heat in hot water is lost down the drain. Dan Cautley, an energy engineer with the Energy Center of Wisconsin, says that drain water “may be one of our largest untapped resources.”It turns out that we can do something about that. In the right application, drainline heat exchangers allow a significant portion of the heat from hot water going down the drain to be recovered. Maximizing recovery efficiencyAccording to an article in Environmental Building News, heat recovery efficiency can be as high as 60% — which can effectively double the water heating efficiency. Just how much benefit a drainline heat exchanger will provide will depend on usage patterns and how the plumbing in a house is configured.For the highest rate of heat recovery, it is ideal if all household members use the same shower (or have several showers that drain through the same vertical length of drainline). It helps if the water heater is in a basement (or beneath the showers and close by, so that there is minimal length of supply piping from the heat exchanger to the water heater).These systems are even more cost-effective in schools and commercial buildings that use a lot of hot water: school shower facilities, health clubs, laundromats, commercial kitchens, etc.last_img read more

Thinking Clearly About the 3 Levels of the Building Enclosure

first_imgWhy it matters“OK, that’s all well and good,” you’re thinking about now. “But what does this mean to me?”Here’s why it’s important to understand the distinction between these three levels of the building enclosure. Products have ratings. Sometimes it’s the material that’s rated. Sometimes it’s an assembly. And sometimes shady salespeople try to confuse prospects by blurring the lines between what was rated.Let’s take the case of foil-faced bubble wrap. It’s a product made up of a couple of materials: plastic and aluminum foil. But when used in the building enclosure, it’s only one part of an assembly.By itself, foil-faced bubble wrap has an R-value of about R-1, almost entirely due to the air trapped in the plastic bubbles. Yet go to a trade show and you’ll see sellers of these products claiming much higher numbers. At the Southeast Building Conference a few years ago I asked a foil-faced bubble wrap seller what the R-value of his product was. He claimed a whopping R-15.4.No! That’s not for the bubble wrap itself. That’s for bubble wrap in a particular assembly, and I’m skeptical even of that. Martin Holladay covered this topic really well in his article, “Stay Away from Foil-Faced Bubble Wrap.” (See especially the section of his article titled, “Blurring the line between product R-values and assembly R-values.”)Of course, R-value isn’t the only place you need to understand the distinction between material, assembly, and enclosure. Here are a few others:Windows. U-factor and solar heat gain ratings apply to the whole assembly, not just the glass.Blower door tests. Done for a whole enclosure. Permeance. Individual product ratings must be combined with the other materials in an assembly to find the net drying capacity of an assembly.An assembly problem or a material problem?Here on GBA, Peter Yost recently explained an interesting failure on his home. (It’s the “OK, Mr. Building Scientist,” which you should go read if you haven’t yet.)He had mold growing on his fairly new wood clapboard siding. The first thing most people with some understanding of building science would look for is a moisture problem. Maybe there’s a failure in the drainage plane, or maybe the builder should have used a vented rainscreen, or…In his case, though, the culprit wasn’t a problem with an assembly. It was a material problem. I won’t spoil it for you, though. Go read it now and find out what caused his mold.A blower door test won’t tell you how tight an assembly isHere’s one final example to help you understand materials, assemblies, and enclosures. Blower door testing tells you how tight a whole building enclosure is. It doesn’t tell you how tight each wall assembly or window or floor or ceiling is. You could have a really airtight enclosure overall and still have a failure in one location if a lot of your air leakage happens at that one place. Blower doors don’t tell you how good individual assemblies are. That’s why visual inspections are still necessary.The building enclosure is what determines how well a building will perform. To get a good building enclosure, though, you need to use good assemblies. And for the assemblies to perform, they’ve got to be made with good materials. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLES Understanding Air Barriers, Vapor Barriers, and Drainage PlanesGBA Encyclopedia: The Building EnvelopeHow to Become a Building Enclosure Control FreakThe Importance of Defining the Building EnclosureAll About Water-Resistive BarriersDo I Need a Vapor Retarder?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersQuestions and Answers About Air BarriersBlower Door BasicsLstiburek: Air Barrier or Vapor Barrier? When you approach the subject of building science, especially regarding heat, air, and moisture flows through a building enclosure, it’s easy to get confused. There’s a lot to learn: blower door testing, insulation grading, R-value, vapor permeance, radiant barriers, combustion safety, solar heat gain coefficients, and on and on. That’s why we break things down into simpler pieces. In science, that process has led to all kinds of discoveries (atoms, nuclei, quarks, organs, cells, bacteria…).In building science, the first big breakdown that I find helps people grasp the basic ideas is seeing the house as a combination of the mechanical systems and the building enclosure. I heard an analogy on the radio once that helps make sense of this: Your HVAC system is the faucet; the building enclosure is the cup. The mechanical systems are very important, of course, but they depend on the quality of the building enclosure. And that’s where another important classification clarifies things.The building enclosure is the boundary between the conditioned space and various types of unconditioned space (outdoors, garage, attic…). It’s a key concept in building science and in understanding the house as a system. This is Building Science 101. But there’s a hierarchy here. We should be thinking of this in three levels:MaterialAssemblyEnclosureThe enclosure includes floors, walls, and ceilings. Each of those components is typically made up of assemblies. And assemblies are made of materials.last_img read more

The Greek SuperLeague Schedule is Set

first_imgSource: AGONAsport.com! (Facebook – Instagram) TweetPinShare11 Shares MATCHDAY 30Panathinaikos – LarissaXanthi – VeriaAtromitos – PlataniasAsteras Tripolis – IraklisPAOK – KerkyraPanetolikos – OlympiacosPanionios – LevadiakosPAS Giannina – AEK ALL THE DERBIESMatchday 6: Olympiacos – AEKMatchday 8: Olympiackos – PAOKMatchday 9: PAOK – AEKMatchday 10: Olympiacos – PanathinaikosMatchday 11: Panathinaikos – AEKMatchday 13: Panathinaikos – PAOKMatchday 21: AEK – OlympiacosMatchday 23: PAOK – OlympiacosMatchday 24: AEK – PAOKMatchday 25: Panathinaikos – OlympiacosMatchday 26: AEK – PanathinaikosMatchday 28: PAOK – Panathinaikoscenter_img MATCHDAY 1Kerkyra – AtromitosIraklis – XanthiOlympiacos – Asteras TripolisLevadiakos – PAOKLarissa – VeriaAEK – PanetolikosPlatanias – PanathinaikosPanionios – PAS Giannina The Greek SuperLeague draw was conducted today and AGONAsport.com brings you a list of all the season’s matches, including all the derbies and top games.The SuperLeague kicks off in one month and the schedule for the upcoming season has been released after today’s draw. The first derby will be on Matchday 6 between Olympiacos and AEK. The “eternal rivals” Olympiacos and Panathinaikos will play on Matchdays 10 and 25, with the first game taking place at the Karaiskaki sSadium.The SuperLeague will begin on the weekend of August 20th and the regular season will end on the weekend of April 30th, with the exact dates and times of each match to be announced at a later date. The exact schedule will depend on which teams qualify for the group stages of the UEFA Champions & Europa League.Below is a list of the first and final matchdays and all of the derbies for the upcoming SuperLeague season.last_img read more

Data Protection Bill to be Tabled in September

first_img This was noted by Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, during the recent opening of the $3.5-million Annotto Bay computer resource centre in St. Mary. The Government’s Data Protection Bill, which aims to safeguard the privacy of individuals whose personal information has been documented by entities with whom they interface, is expected to be tabled in September when the Houses of Parliament reconvene following the August summer recess. Story Highlights r. Wheatley, who made the initial announcement during the 2017/18 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives in April, indicated then that the law aimed to govern the collection, regulation, processing, storage, use and disclosure of certain information in physical or electronic form. The Government’s Data Protection Bill, which aims to safeguard the privacy of individuals whose personal information has been documented by entities with whom they interface, is expected to be tabled in September when the Houses of Parliament reconvene following the August summer recess.This was noted by Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, during the recent opening of the $3.5-million Annotto Bay computer resource centre in St. Mary.He said the Bill aims to offer individuals an additional level of security in relation to how institutions treat with their personal information.Dr. Wheatley, who made the initial announcement during the 2017/18 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives in April, indicated then that the law aimed to govern the collection, regulation, processing, storage, use and disclosure of certain information in physical or electronic form.“So, whether it’s the bank… the Government of Jamaica… or any other institution… once you are in possession of someone’s personal information, you must deal with that information in such a manner that offers that person a level of protection and confidence,” the Minister said in Annotto Bay.He also indicated during his Sectoral Debate presentation that the 2015 Cybercrimes Act will be reviewed during the current fiscal year to address concerns regarding how sections of the law are interpreted and enforced.Additionally, the Minister said a new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Bill will also be tabled.While encouraging greater use of ICT, Dr. Wheatley again urged persons and entities to exercise caution when doing so and safeguard themselves against cyberattacks.The Minister also encouraged persons to move away from being mere consumers of technology and become innovators, noting that “we have that inherent capacity”.“We have seen where a number of our young people are gaining employment opportunities within the app development… and in animation,” Dr. Wheatley said.The Annotto Bay computer resource centre, which is situated on the grounds of the St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church, is the 256th computer access point (CAP) developed by the Universal Service Fund (USF), and the ninth established in St. Mary.It is outfitted with 16 desktop computers, one Internet broadband server and supporting network capability, one printer, one projector, and two air-conditioning units.The USF also conducted electricity upgrading on the building housing the centre, which was provided through a partnership between the Church and the Annotto Bay Community Development and Environmental Benefit Society, which applied for the CAP.last_img read more

$300 Million to Boost Community Tourism Activities

first_img Speaking at the official launch of M-Academy at the Chinese Benevolent Association, Old Hope Road in St. Andrew on April 11, Mr. Bartlett said the money will be spent in 63 communities across the country to have small events and activities to attract more visitors, and increase the earnings of small tourism suppliers. Story Highlights Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says $300 million has been budgeted to boost community tourism activities across the island.Speaking at the official launch of M-Academy at the Chinese Benevolent Association, Old Hope Road in St. Andrew on April 11, Mr. Bartlett said the money will be spent in 63 communities across the country to have small events and activities to attract more visitors, and increase the earnings of small tourism suppliers.“Once you create that capacity within the communities to be able to convert knowledge into material things and events, you are going to invite tourism into the community, and that’s what I’m about.It’s about increasing growth and increasing development, so tourism is not about the coastline but the experiences are in the communities, and so we want to build out that capacity,” he said.The Minister further added that the building out of more tourism activities is critical and will redound to the continued development of the industry.“We are going to work with the Tourism Linkages Network, because we have budgets to deal with that… to help to build capacity within communities,” he said.The primary objective of the Tourism Linkages Network is to increase the consumption of goods and services that can be competitively sourced locally. It also aims to create employment while generating and retaining the country’s foreign exchange earning potential.In the meantime, the Minister lauded the creation of the M-Academy, adding that “it seeks to build out another tier of skill sets which is so important in broadening the capacity of Jamaicans.”M-Academy is a Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) and Main Event Entertainment Group partnership. The main objective of the initiative is to train persons in various aspects of event production.The programme will last for six months with the trainees drawn from the 18 communities targeted by JSIF. Training for the first cohort of approximately 100 persons is slated to commence in May. “Once you create that capacity within the communities to be able to convert knowledge into material things and events, you are going to invite tourism into the community, and that’s what I’m about. Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says $300 million has been budgeted to boost community tourism activities across the island.last_img read more