Registration opens for Holy Half Marathon

first_imgThe time for training season has officially begun for people running in the Holy Half Marathon this year. The Student Union Board (SUB) has opened registration for the ninth annual half marathon that will take participants on a scenic route through Notre Dame’s campus March 23. “The Holy Half is one of the biggest student-run events on campus and has quickly become a Notre Dame tradition,” Maria Murphy, an SUB representative, said. Murphy, who is also a Holy Half programmer this year, said the best part of the Holy Half is that runners not only get to train and compete in a 13.1 mile race, but also get to make a difference in the South Bend community on behalf of the University. “All proceeds from the race go to the Women’s Care Center (WCC) and the Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County,” Murphy said. “Our goal this year is to raise $40,000 for these awesome organizations.” This year the Holy Half will include a new course for runners, Murphy said. She said the event will also feature Mike Collins, the voice of Notre Dame Stadium, as the emcee. “Runners will get a 2013 Holy Half t-shirt and a bunch of other free goodies from our sponsors,” Murphy said. “All volunteers will get lots of food and our undying thanks.” Sponsors for the 2013 Holy Half include GU Energy, Blistex, Jimmy Johns, Dunkin’ Donuts, Harper Cancer Research Institute, Hagerty, Zone Perfect and ABRO Industries, Murphy said. For those runners who aren’t prepared to run 13.1 miles, there is also a 10k race option that will take place 15 minutes after the half marathon begins. Murphy said there is a capacity for 1,300 runners. For students who aren’t runners but still want to get involved, there are plenty of spots open for student volunteers to help set up the race, run water stations and cheer on runners. “By volunteering I gained so much respect for people who were able to run that long,” Ann Kebede, a 2012 volunteer for the event, said. “It was especially cool to watch the girls who kept such a fast pace. I also liked seeing people I knew run past while I cheered them on.” Kebede said volunteering was a great way to get involved in the event because she knew she wouldn’t want to participate as a runner. “A lot of what I did was cheer people on and give them motivation to keep going,” Kebede said. The Holy Half is a great way for Notre Dame and the surrounding community to be able to physically participate in the athletic culture of the school, she said. “It is an athletic event that the whole campus can do, as well as the outside community,” Kebede said. “Since athletics is such a big part of Notre Dame, this is a great thing that is open to everyone and gives people the opportunity to be active for a day.” Murphy said SUB has given the Holy Half a lot of freedom this year. She added that SUB plans to make the race fun for all and, most importantly, raise money for WCC and the Family Center of Saint Joseph’s County. “We are so happy with how the race is coming together and cannot wait for March 23,” Murphy said. The deadline for registration is on March 14.last_img read more

Maeva Djadi-Tabdi highlights forwards’ growth in win over Boston College

first_imgMaeva Djaldi-Tabdi doesn’t care that she had two-straight blocks. On the surface, the 6-foot-2 redshirt freshman showed growth by sticking with the play. Weeks prior against Miami, a team that destroyed Syracuse inside with the high-low play of her forwards, Djaldi-Tabdi seemed a step late each time. One move would free the offensive player, and then it would be a free shot at the hoop. But Sunday, in the Orange’s 96-69 blowout win over the Eagles, Djaldi-Tabdi went straight up. She sent Marnelle Garraud’s first layup attempt back. Boston College grabbed the ball off the miss, and when Taylor Soule went back up to the ball, Djaldi-Tabdi swatted it again, then grabbed the rebound with two hands.The crowd cheered. The bench jumped. SU head coach Quentin Hillsman clapped his hands. The Orange went on a 9-2 run and a possible close game became the blowout it was once primed to be. But after the game, Djaldi-Tabdi dodged the opportunity to credit herself.“No. 11 (Emma Guy) scored 30 points. We shouldn’t be able to give that to someone,” Djaldi-Tabdi said. “So blocks are good, but that’s something we have to work on.”In Syracuse’s (18-5, 7-3 Atlantic Coast) dominant win over the Eagles (14-10, 3-8), the forward and centers unit headlined by Djaldi-Tabdi — who led the group with 16 points on 8-of-12 shooting — showed improvement with its increased intensity on the defensive end and more seamless movement in transition the other way. As SU broke out of its recent shooting slump, the forwards were given more openings on the inside to score. And they did, outscoring the Eagles 52-30 in the paint.Despite 30 points from Guy, the Orange’s defensive unit looked strong down low. Multiple good switches and rotations led to tipped passes and blocked shots. The Orange, who average 4.7 blocks per game as a team, surpassed that mark by the 7:34 mark of the third quarter and finished with six in the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think a lot of it just comes from better positioning on the block and in the paint,” Hillsman said.All season long, the Orange have preached the importance of working the ball inside and getting their bigs going in the context of their offensive efficiency. As the Orange missed 109 threes over their past five games, players and coaches said a constant potential remedy was that more scoring and movement comes through the post players. But Miami proved the Orange have more than just an offensive identity inside. Against a powerful forwards group, SU was exposed for its inability to stick with opponents off the dribble. Against Guy and the Eagles, the Orange started off sloppy. There were a multitude of shooting foul calls on the interior and offensive rebounds bounced in the way of Boston College more often than in any other point of the game, giving second chances and more looks at the free throw line.But the intensity picked up, and SU started to find more ways to work inside. Though Guy scored handily on the inside, Hillsman said a large part of that had to do with the defense of its guards. When a guard got beat on the perimeter, it forced Djaldi-Tabdi and others to play the passing lanes, which made the Orange susceptible to a dump-off pass down low. As the game progressed, the passing lanes grew thinner. Djaldi-Tabdi read the defense and rotated to the left side for a steal in the first half, and in the second half she used her outstretched arms to deflect multiple balls out of bounds.She led a group of bigs that ran well in transition and found herself in the right spots often. She received open passes down low, in transition and on the blocks. As the offense started to exploit the Eagles from the outside, SU pushed the ball inside when it was in need of a bucket. The offensive rebounding picked up — even though Hillsman said at 60-plus percent shooting, there weren’t many to grab — with some aggressive play from Digna Strautmane, who had three of the Orange’s six blocks Sunday. When Djaldi-Tabdi checked out in the third, Strautmane gained a rhythm with six points in the frame.“After the first half they were more focused on the shooters. So, that created more lanes for us to drive,” Miranda Drummond said. “… with our post running the floor in transition, we got a lot of points. Just running the floor.”By the end of the contest, Boston College had the most dominant interior player. But, after the beginning SU’s first conference losing stretch exposed the Orange’s forwards need work, SU left with a feeling of growth.“It’s just about keeping balls alive, touching loose balls,” Hillsman said. “I just thought we did a better job second half of just keeping balls alive and just getting bodies on them.” Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 10, 2019 at 5:51 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearycenter_img Commentslast_img read more