Infantino calls for patience on fans returning to games

first_imgRelatedPosts Italy introduces compulsory virus testing for travellers from France Nigeria records new COVID-19 infections, more deaths as figures rise to 57,242 I was in best of forms before Tokyo Paralympics was postponed — Powerlifter Ejike FIFA president Gianni Infantino is not expecting a quick return to stadiums for football fans even as the coronavirus crisis eases.“Let’s not forget that there needs always to be a place for fans,” the head of the sport’s world governing body said in a video message to FIFA’s 211 member-nations. “Football without spectators is clearly not the same, but we need to be patient when considering the right time to bring fans back to the stadiums.“We will continue to work tirelessly, but also discreetly and respectfully, to move beyond these temporary measures, and to ensure that fans are welcomed back in a safe and responsible way.”The German Bundesliga has returned behind closed doors with leagues in Italy, Spain and England soon following suit.Limited numbers of fans have already started returning to matches in Hungary.Infantino said FIFA would host a number of online discussions with national federations and stakeholders “to shape a better football for the future.” The international calendar and the number of matches played by top players will be on the agenda.And Infantino also said he had heard “interesting proposals’’ on finance and governance from “salary caps to transfer fee caps or other taxation mechanisms’’ and the creation of emergency funds.dpa/NAN.Tags: CoronavirusFIFAgianni infantinolast_img read more

No joy for Gardiner

first_imgDespite a great performance Tipperary’s Dean Gardiner has failed to progress at the World Elite Boxing Championships in Hamburg.He lost on a split decision to 4th seed Cristian Salcedo of Columbia in his last 16 bout.Here’s the reaction of the AIBA commentator to the result. Photo © AIBAlast_img

How Plants Send Email: Update

first_imghref=”crev07.htm#plant17″>07/13/2001 headline), we reported the startling finding that plants talk to themselves in email.  What’s new in this field?  Is there really an interplant intranet?    In the Oct. 5 issue of Current Biology,1 Norman, Frederick and Sieburth report evidence that a signal molecule named BYPASS1 is sent from the roots to the tips of the plant, and suppresses the growth of leaves.  It acts as a negative regulator of plant growth hormones.    Plant growth hormones are produced in the tips of shoots.  With too much growth hormone, leaves might grow too rapidly without knowing when the roots are struggling to find water, are having trouble getting through compacted soil, or fighting other harsh conditions.  The roots need to be able to regulate leaf growth, therefore, and must be able to turn up the release of hormone only when the supply is adequate.  The report on EurekAlert describes the control like a faucet handle that the root turns, but since the flow is at the shoot, the handle is really up where the leaves are.  By sending this chemical signal up the network, the root has remote control over the spigot of growth hormone: something akin to switch remotely operated by a computer system administrator, who sends a correctly-formatted message the switch understands.    This explains how the same plant can look different depending on where it grows.  Plants are composed of cells without a central nervous system or brain, yet the various parts need to act in concert.  A plant can’t just walk away in tough times to look for greener pastures; it has to respond as a unit to changing conditions.  The solution is a coordinated system of signals, feedback and regulatory functions.  This study shows that roots are not just sending water and nutrients blindly upward, unaware of the conditions above ground.  They are sending chemical signals to keep in touch with the leaf tips.  Undoubtedly this is two-way communication, because the roots also must be informed of conditions above ground.    BYPASS1, a gene that codes for a carotenoid compound, is one more example of signal transduction, or “email,” in plants.  The July 2001 headline spoke of messenger RNA used for signalling.  Undoubtedly proteins and other chemical compounds as well are used in the interplant intranet to convey messages.  Each chemical needs a receptor at the destination that understands the message.  A plant, therefore, comprises an information processing system.  Because information is passed throughout the branching pathways inside a plant, with sources and destinations defined, containing messages that are translated and understood and acted upon, the analogy to email over an intranet is an apt one.    Overarching this system is a network of networks.  Different species of plants are also able to communicate with each other through the underground pipeline (see 06/17/2004 headline).  This shows that the local area networks of individual plants are combined into a wide-area network, or internet.  Information processing over a communication network is therefore the foundation of ecology:Plant architecture is regulated by endogenous developmental programs, but it can also be strongly influenced by cues derived from the environment.  For example, rhizosphere conditions such as water and nutrient availability affect shoot and root architecture; this implicates the root as a source of signals that can override endogenous developmental programs. …The BPS1 expression profile clustered with a group of genes containing many kinases and transcription factors proposed to possibly function in a signaling network.1Another article on EurekAlert discussed how researchers at Duke University are following one particular email message, a protein regulator in root cells.  The scientists “made the surprising finding that the … protein is one means by which one root cell ‘talks’ to another to instruct it to develop in a certain way.”1Norman, Frederick and Sieburth, “BYPASS1 Negatively Regulates a Root-Derived Signal that Controls Plant Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 19, 5 October 2004, Pages 1739-1746, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.09.045.When you send an email to a friend, it presupposes a large infrastructure of computers, routers, wires, and software.  Without them, your message would sit in your computer and go nowhere.  Your message is formatted into packets according the standards of internet protocol.  Every piece of hardware and software in the network has to understand the protocol.  It has to be able to read the header to properly route the packet from the source to the destination.  Some messages can be broadcast to a group of recipients, or to everyone on the network.  Some require acknowledgement before action; others, like a message in a bottle, can be picked up by any recipient.  Different protocols provide many different services.  Somehow, a plant accomplishes the same thing.  It can send messages to individuals, groups, or “anyone online.”  The receptors understand the messages and act accordingly.    The internet is a relatively new human invention that has revolutionized society.  It didn’t just happen.  It is the result of many efforts initiated by intelligent designers who dreamed of establishing a robust communications system.  As we pat ourselves on the back for our communications network, now we find that plants had one all along.  Think of the messaging going on from the roots of a giant redwood to the topmost leaves, and then all the messages being passed underground from plant to plant.  It wouldn’t be surprising to find out someday that plants are already programmed with spam filtering, security and antiterrorism surveillance and maybe even innovations we have not even imagined yet.    Signal transduction – the passing and recognition of messages – is a defining characteristic of life.  All living things are continually in the communication business.  Single cells have elaborate signal transduction mechanisms for recognizing “self” and “other” entities, and for regulating all the machines in the molecular factory.  Cells communicate with other cells.  Within multicellular organisms, cells communicate within the body and without.  Plants, animals and humans are constantly sending and receiving messages.  Even the machines humans make, from railroad semaphores to telegraphs to wireless internet communications, are extensions of our own intelligent signalling systems.  Inanimate matter does not do any of this on its own.  Solids, liquids and gases can exchange energy through conduction, convection and radiation, but neither send nor understand signals that allow them to make decisions, unless programmed by intelligent design.  Since signaling is a fundamental property of life, why should anyone presume it could emerge from nonlife?  Would it not make more sense to assume that there is a living Creator who is a communicator by nature, and that he extended his intelligence to the life he designed?    Non-sentient life might be considered analogous to our most advanced human robotics, with robust engineering design that allows it to respond to changing conditions (see 09/22/2004 headline).  Into humans, however, the Source of all communication – the Word – imbued an image of his own sentience, so that we can not only recognize and respond to messages, but understand them.  To these alone he shared the greatest communication of all (Hebrews 1:1-3).(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa to pilot smart ID cards

first_img8 May 2012 South Africans will move one step closer to having smart card IDs when the Department of Home Affairs launches the pilot of its smart ID project, which promises to speed up government services while cutting down on crime and corruption involving identity documents. Briefing journalists in Pretoria last week, Home Affairs Director-General Mkuseli Apleni said the pilot – to be launched within the next six months – would involve the issue of 2 000 smart IDs to allow for the testing of the smart cards’ systems, hardware and software. “It will also enable the government to procure the required machinery to produce the volume of cards that will be required, so that we eventually completely phase out the current green bar-coded ID.”Old IDs to be phased out over four years Home Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said last month that the roll-out of the smart IDs – their issue to new ID applicants – would begin in 2013. Apleni said that, once all the systems were tested and in place to produce the smart cards, all new ID applications would be treated as applications for smart IDs – at which point the minister would promulgate the costs of the smart IDs for citizens. These are expected to be similar to the current costs for documents. It was possible that the green bar-coded ID could eventually be phased out over about four years, Apleni said.One card fits all? Apleni said the government was looking at having South Africans use just one card for all their official documentation requirements – identities, licences, National Health Insurance, social grants. He said the departments of transport, health and social development were wanting to be involved in the project, adding that Home Affairs would look into how it could upscale the chip on the cards in order to accommodate these departments. BuaNews and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

FCC Report Finds Better Broadband Needed for Schools and Libraries

first_imgaudrey watters However, nearly 80% of all survey respondents say their broadband connections do not fully meet their current needs. 55% say that slow connection speed is the primary reason their needs aren’t met. 39% says that cost of service is the major barrier to meeting their Internet needs. 27% cite installation costs as the barrier. Rural schools and libraries, in particular, struggle to provide adequate bandwidth to their users.What Are E-Rate Recipients Using Broadband For?Email tops the list of the most-used app by E-rate users. 98% of respondents say that’s what Internet access is regularly used for and 69% say it’s the most essential app. For libraries, online reference materials are the most important and most used app. 86% of library staff and patrons regularly use online reference materials, and 62% say it’s the most essential tool they access online.Schools and libraries both indicate that they see usage increasing. For example, 56% of all E-rate survey respondents say they plan on expanding their usage of digital textbooks in the next 2 years, and 45% say they plan to implement or expand their use of handheld devices for educational purposes. Currently, the average student-to-computer ratio of those schools responding to the survey is 5.86 to 1.According to the FCC, this data will help the agency make better policy decisions for the E-rate program. The FCC has made better broadband access one of its major goals. The FCC has released a report on the state of broadband connectivity at those schools and libraries that receive funds from the federal E-rate program. The E-rate program provides more than $2.25 billion in funding annually in order to offer discounts for schools and libraries so that they can obtain affordable telecommunications services and Internet access.The report is based on data from a survey conducted in 2010 that looks at broadband usage in schools and libraries. The survey found that almost all respondents have some form of broadband connection to at least one facility. Just 2% use satellite and 3% use dial-up in order to access the Internet.Most schools and libraries that responded have Internet speeds greater than 3 Mbps (55%). 10% have speeds greater than 100 Mbps. More than half of the school districts that responded (60%) say they subscribe to a fiber optic connection. Private schools are more than twice as likely as public schools to have either cable (31% to 16%) or DSL (29% to 16%). And 66% of respondents say they provide some wireless connectivity for students, staff and library patrons. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#E-Learning#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts last_img read more