Sri Lanka’s Silva hospitalised after blow to the head

first_imgCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP): Sri Lanka’s Test opener Kaushal Silva was taken to hospital yesterday after being hit on the head by a cricket ball while fielding in a domestic match. Sri Lanka Cricket said that Silva was struck during a match in Pallekele. His scans were clear, but he was flown to a hospital in the capital Colombo for further tests and observation, the cricket body added. Silva has played 24 Test matches for Sri Lanka and scored 1,404 runs at an average of 31. “Kaushal was fielding at short leg when he got hit,” espncricinfo.com quoted national team manager Charith Senanayake as saying. According to Senanayake, Sri Lanka vice-captain Dinesh Chandimal “swept right on to the back of Kaushal’s head. He did take evasive action, but still the ball hit him”. The website said Silva was wearing a helmet with additional padding, a design introduced for player safety after the death of Australia batsman Phillip Hughes after being struck by a ball on the head in November 2014. Yesterday’s match was part of Sri Lanka’s preparations for its tour of England next month, with the first of three Tests starting at Headingley on May 19.last_img read more

JUST IN: ‘We remain committed to anti-doping’ … JAAA explains IAAF ‘no vote’

first_imgThe Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) has moved to assure that its decision not to vote on constitutional changes at the recent IAAF Special Congress in Monaco does not suggest any discord in it’s solidarity with the fight against doping in the sport. In a release issued late Friday night, the JAAA pointed to what it described as an unprecedented requisite for member federations to vote en masse on 15 proposals, which were to be implemented across two constitutions and executed at the beginning of the years 2017 and 2019. The release, which was signed by General Secretary Garth Gayle, outlines that there was no opportunity to examine individual points and that the JAAA would have preferred further discussions on five particular proposals included in the 15–point plan put forward by the IAAF at the Congress. Among the Jamaican authority’s grouses is the decision to alter the composition of the Council to reflect gender balance. The JAAA contends that this decision was taken by a small group of individuals and needed further discussion at the Congress level. The JAAA also argues that the current age limit of 70 years old, which was agreed in the 2015 constitution, was removed without any discussion at Congress, and also noted their discontent that committees would no longer be elected by Congress but would instead be appointed under the new plan. Other issues raised by the JAAA include term limits. “Term limits were already agreed to and included in the 2015 constitution. In this new document, the three-term maximum period is still included, but would no longer apply to the existing council members who could serve until 2027 if re-elected. Some of these members have already served four terms,” read the JAAA’s response. The organisation also argues that the Council’s Executive Board would be drastically changed without full discussion among member federations. It is against these issues and the fact that they could not vote on individual points that the JAAA says it decided to not cast a vote at all. “First and foremost, the member countries were not asked to vote on any one issue. There was a list of 15 different proposals contained in two constitutions which Congress was asked to ‘Rubber Stamp’ (vote for without amendment). This in itself was unprecedented. We know of no other time in the 104-year history of the IAAF that federations had to vote for a series of proposals as a unit. We would have preferred for items to be separated, discussed and voted on individually,” read the JAAA statement. “The JAAA is also keen to point out that at no point were we against any changes that would see tighter restrictions against drug cheats. Our president Dr Warren Blake’s introduction to the JAAA executive was as a drug tester and the Federation has always opposed doping in sports and have consistently fought to eliminate doping in sport,” the release added. The IAAF was forced into change on the back of the uncovering of a massive doping and corruption scandal that rocked the international body. New IAAF president Sebastian Coe, who replaced Lamine Diack, who is at the centre of the scandal, has  led a charge to clean up the sport and return its credibility. At the base of that effort is a 15-point plan that included anti-doping, regulation and administrative changes that is hoped will lift the sport. Coe’s proposals were overwhelmingly welcomed with 95 per cent of the member federations voting in favour of a constitutional reform at the Congress, which took place on December 3.last_img read more

Top Donegal restaurants and chefs scoop Irish Restaurant Awards

first_imgIf you’re looking to enjoy the crème de la crème the next time you dine out, then the winners of the Ulster Irish Restaurant Awards will be a good place to start.Local restaurants, pubs, food heroes and chefs enjoyed great success at the regional finals last night in Monaghan, which was attended by over 450 restaurant owners and staff.The awards covered a wide range of venues and the winners from each of Ulster’s nine counties. Harvey’s Point on Lough Eske was a big winner on the night as the team picked up four titles. The Donegal winners were: Best Restaurant – The Lemon Tree Restaurant, LetterkennyBest Chef – Colin McKee of Harvey’s PointBest Restaurant Manager –  Orhan Erinc of Harvey’s PointBest Customer Service – Harvey’s PointBest Hotel and Guesthouse Restaurant – Rathmullan HouseBest Gastro Pub –  The House Gastro Pub, Donegal TownBest Café – The Salty Fox, BundoranPub of the Year – The Rusty Mackerel, TeelinBest Wine Experience – Harvey’s PointBest Newcomer – Fisk Seafood Bar, DowningsBest World Cuisine – Chandpur Restaurant, Donegal TownBest “Free From” – Wholegreen Healthfood LetterkennyBest Kids Size Me – Mill Park Hotel, Donegal TownBest Local Food Hero – Mairead Anderson of Killybegs Seafood ShackBest Emerging Irish Cuisine – Foyle Hotel and Restaurant, MovilleBest Casual Dining – Olde Glen Bar, GlenThose who won at county level will progress to the All-Ireland event on the 13th May with the restaurants that have already won in Leinster, where they will all compete for the Regional and All-Ireland titles.Speaking at the Ulster Regional Finals in Hillgrove Hotel, Monaghan, Adrian Cummins, Chief Executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland (RAI) said: “Now in their 11th year, the Irish Restaurant Awards continue to showcase the incredible food that is on offer in the cafes, pubs and restaurants of Ireland, as well as recognising the teams behind these establishments and the hard work and dedication that they put in. With well over 80,000 nominations received from the public this year, the standard for the judging process was higher than ever.“Ireland may be a small country, but it boasts everything from fine dining to high quality gastropubs, from the comfort of traditional Irish food to exploring the world though exotic world cuisine, the Irish restaurant industry has much to offer. We have an appreciation for what we eat and where our food comes from, as well as the dedication of those working in the food industry”.   Top Donegal restaurants and chefs scoop Irish Restaurant Awards was last modified: March 13th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

South Africa is committed to strong fiscal discipline

first_img• With regards to the fiscal framework, government has stuck to its spending limits for the past three years and is on track to stay within the expenditure ceiling in 2015/16.• Government’s central fiscal objective over the medium term is to stabilise the growth of debt as a share of GDP.• Strict adherence to the planned expenditure ceiling as well as the proposed long-term fiscal guideline of linking government spending with long term growth are projected to result in gross debt stabilising at 49.4% of GDP in 2018/19.• South Africa has also regularly acknowledged for the transparency of its budget procedures. According to the Open Budget Index of the International Budget Partnership, South Africa is ranked third of 102 countries in 2015.last_img

The 10 Unforeseen Developments of Smart Buildings

first_imgTrends Driving the Loyalty Marketing Industry Frank Landman Follow the Puck What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Frank is a freelance journalist who has worked in various editorial capacities for over 10 years. He covers trends in technology as they relate to business. center_img For the past decade or so, we’ve watched as conventional devices and applications made the upgrade to become “smart.” Our phones became smartphones, our TVs became smart TVs, and soon people started talking about the concept of a “smart building,” or even a “smart city,” based on an integrated network and hundreds, if not thousands, of sensors and devices.Smart buildings sound cool, but more importantly, they have the power to fundamentally improve how we conduct business—not to mention setting the stage for even more powerful, interconnected smart cities in the broader context of the connected world. Already, CEOs, entrepreneurs, and organizational leaders are making the upgrades necessary to turn their existing building into a futuristic, data-gathering information hub, but we may be getting ahead of ourselves. There are many secondary effects, consequences, and complexities we need to be considering.The Unforeseen DevelopmentsWhile the technology behind it is complicated, the idea of a smart building is relatively simple. There’s no real formal definition in place, but a smart building is any building that relies on a self-contained network and multiple IoT devices to gather data, form conclusions, and/or automate certain features of the building.For example, a building may use sensors to observe the traffic patterns of visitors, which can then be used to improve the layout of the space. It may also proactively monitor the status of equipment, issuing alerts when attention is required or taking care of some maintenance by itself.These are just some of the seldom-considered developments that will arise in response to the development of these buildings:1. Impact on maintenance staff. Automation and AI have tremendous potential to replace or dramatically change human jobs, and the devices and sensors necessary to upgrade a smart building are no exception to that rule. Currently, most buildings have maintenance staff—either full-time or third-party—to handle things like minor repairs, regular inspections, cleanliness, and upkeep. But as more devices are able to replace or improve these roles, the maintenance industry will need to adapt. Some human workers may find their jobs in jeopardy, but the majority of roles won’t be replaced; they’ll simply be changed. Maintenance workers will need to learn how to incorporate these new technologies into their jobs, and may be required to maintain and oversee more sensors and devices, as opposed to equipment directly.2. Privacy concerns. We also need to acknowledge the privacy concerns expressed by experts and consumers alike with regard to the onset of smart buildings and, eventually, smart cities. Consumers who enter a building may be immediately and constantly tracked from the moment they enter. Should companies and organizations be freely allowed to use these data for customer analysis purposes? What if customers use free in-building Wi-Fi; should companies be allowed to monitor what sites their customers are visiting? And what about the other data in their smart devices? There’s no clear answer here, which is why the world of consumer privacy is about to get even more complicated with the development of smart buildings.3. Data ownership. Another issue related to consumer data is the matter of data ownership. Smart buildings will introduce more methods of tracking, data storage, and data analysis than ever before, which means organizations will be hungry for more consumer data. But who truly owns these data, and how can they be used? For example, if one company tracks the activity of their customers using sensors in their main building (let’s say a gym tracking the activities of its members), would they be free to sell those data to a third party (like a weight loss organization)? Or would they first need to get the express written permission of those customers?4. Changes in demand. The emergence of smart buildings will cause an economic ripple effect across various industries as demand increases for certain components. As an example, let’s consider the battery industry. Smart buildings would hypothetically need hundreds, if not thousands of tiny, individual devices as part of their internal networks. To run wirelessly, those devices will need batteries. Multiply that by thousands, if not millions of buildings suddenly demanding this fleet of devices, and you’ll have an industry overrun with new demand. New industries may spring up to address these types of needs, while others may die out entirely.5. Vulnerability to hacking and corruption. IoT, in general, has raised concerns about security, and the possibilities of hacking and corruption. If a personal computer is hacked, we might get our identity stolen or might lose important personal files, but if there’s a breach across an entire smart building, it could pose a serious safety concern to everyone in that building. Redundant systems and higher security standards can only go so far; nothing is uhackable, and new technologies always have exploits that can be taken advantage of.6. Legal complexities and fault. If a system does become hacked or corrupted, and someone in the building is hurt because of it, who will be held responsible for the damages? New technologies always introduce new legal complexities, and they usually introduce them at a rate much faster than politicians and lawyers can keep up with. In the wake of smart buildings and other smart technologies, our legal systems need to get smarter as well. Whether or not they will, or whether they can truly keep pace, remains to be seen.7. Economic stress. Smart buildings and smart cities can also introduce new economic factors, including economic stress. Existing wealthy clients and successful businesses will have access to more advanced technology than struggling populations or failing businesses, which could create more vast discrepancies between rich and poor. It may also enable some businesses to operate much more efficiently, making it harder for competition to enter the market.8. Inter-city competition and spending. Companies aren’t the only ones that will be competing with smart building advancements; cities may begin competing with each other as well, hoping to become one of the first smart cities on the planet, or in a given area. The problem with this is that cities typically operate with a very limited budget and many other practical problems to deal with, like infrastructure damage and poverty relief. Overspending on tech developments could end up being counterproductive, especially if those cities aren’t spending enough on supportive strategies to ensure that technology is safe and productive.9. Developmental differences. Smart buildings could feasibly be designed as top-down or bottom-up; it’s entirely reasonable to retrofit an existing building with new devices, sensors, and systems to make building maintenance easier, but companies could also design brand-new buildings from scratch. These designs rely on very different industries, and could have radically different impacts on the companies using them (as well as the cities hosting them).10. Unreasonable and unmet expectations. People tend to have deep misconceptions about the realities of futuristic technologies, like deep learning and AI. They imagine future developments as being extremely polished and enormously functional, but in reality, new technologies tend to offer new functionalities gradually, with flaws and hiccups along the way. When the first smart buildings begin to emerge, people may not know what to expect from them, and their expectations will likely be lofty. When those expectations aren’t met, it could lead to interruptions in financing and lower overall demand for smart buildings.Preparing for a Smart Building Takeover?Depending on how you want to define the term, you can likely determine that smart buildings are already being constructed and developed. With so much enthusiasm and potential behind the new technology, momentum isn’t going to stop anytime soon. This is ultimately a good thing for corporations, cities, and everyday consumers, but we need to be aware of the secondary effects, consequences, and new issues that may arise as we attempt to improve these structures. Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

‘Talks have stopped’ for Barca target Arthur

first_imgTransfers ‘Talks have stopped’ – Gremio to make Barcelona wait for Arthur deal Ryan Benson 18:04 2/5/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(2) arthur-cropped Getty Images Transfers Barcelona Grêmio Primera División Serie A The Catalans have long wanted the 21-year-old, but they will have to wait for at least another 12 months to get their hands on him Highly rated Gremio midfielder Arthur will not be leaving before December, regardless of any potential deal that is struck with Barcelona, according to club president Romildo Bolzan Jr.Arthur, 21, has been strongly linked with a move to Catalonia for several months and angered officials at Gremio when he was photographed wearing a Barca jersey in a meeting with their sporting director Robert Fernandez at the start of December.Barca were quick to offer an apology to the Copa Libertadores champions, reportedly keen to remain on good terms with Gremio in anticipation of negotiations eventually getting started. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player And, while Bolzan confirmed there have been talks, he swiftly highlighted that even if a deal is struck between the two clubs, Arthur – who reportedly has a €50 million release clause – will not be leaving before the end of the year.”At this moment it’s [transfer talks] stopped,” Bolzan told UOL Esporte. “But I can tell you that all the ideas are Arthur will stay with us until December.”All parties agree that it is more or less agreed that Arthur will stay until the end of 2018 if the negotiations are completed. I repeat, if they are completed.”Arthur has yet to make his international debut for Brazil, but at the end of 2017 was called to the squad to face Bolivia and Chile as recognition of his burgeoning talent.last_img read more