Cops: Man Robbed 3 Suffolk Banks in a Week

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 54-year-old Brentwood man charged with committing three bank robberies in less than a week was arrested 20 minutes after allegedly robbing another bank in Babylon on Friday, Suffolk County police said.George Swanton was spotted on Railroad Avenue around 12:25 p.m. and placed under arrest by responding officers who received a notification broadcasting the alleged robber’s description, police said.Just 20 minutes earlier, Swanton allegedly walked into a Chase bank on West Main Street and told a teller he had a gun as he demanded cash, police said. As he waited, Swanton allegedly demanded money from a second teller. Both tellers complied with his request, police said.Swanton was charged with two counts of third-degree robbery for Friday’s incident. He was also charged with two counts of third-degree robbery for allegedly robbing a Bank of America in West Islip on Jan. 14, and one count of third-degree robbery for allegedly robbing a Brentwood Citibank on Jan. 11.He is scheduled to be arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

UK insurers, consultants produce de-risking guide as medical underwriting gains ground

first_imgThe sector needed to develop an atmosphere of trust, she said, by highlighting potential benefits and risks as well as setting out what companies, advisers, trustees and consumers could expect from the process.“We’re trying to make sure the document gives a fair and balanced view of medical underwriting compared to a conventional approach,” said Mike Edwards, head of product development at L&G in the bulk annuities business.  “In some cases it would be the right thing to do in other cases it wouldn’t,” he said.One of the potential advantages of medical underwriting is that it might result in a lower premium, he said.But trustees and sponsors had raised concerns that if they did opt to have individual scheme members’ health and lifestyles assessed in order to set annuity prices, the price could end up being higher as well as lower than it would otherwise have been, he said.And once a scheme had made a detailed enquiry about medical underwriting, if it then decided not to go ahead with the deal, other bulk annuity providers might take this as a sign that the membership was in better-than-average health and decline to quote. Other firms behind the Good Practice Guide are CMS Cameron McKenna, Just Retirement, Law Debenture and LCP. Insurers and advisers in the UK pensions sector are putting together a guide for trustees and sponsors to help them decide whether or not to use medical underwriting when buying bulk annuities.JLT Employee Benefits,  Partnership, Aviva, Hymans Robertson, Legal & General and others said they plan to produce a “robust guide for the industry”, which will aim to formalise and improve existing industry standards.The move has been prompted by the arrival of new insurers in the market, ready to look at the health and lifestyle characteristics of individual scheme members when setting premiums, the group said.Margaret Snowdon, director of JLT Employee Benefits, said: “With an increasing number of businesses keen to explore using medical underwriting as part of their de-risking strategy, now is the time for the industry to step up and develop a robust guide to ensure good practice.”last_img read more

Why doctors get it wrong about when you will die

first_imgThe Guardian 2 June 2015One of the largest reviews, published in the British Medical Journal, systematically reviewed survival predictions in terminally ill patients with cancer. Eight studies were analysed in three countries over 30 years.Overall, doctors’ predictions were correct to within one week in 25% of cases, correct to within two weeks in 43%, and correct to within four weeks in 61%. The study found that doctors tended to overestimate survival.The very measure of a doctor lies in their predictive abilities, their grasp of the crystal ball: “How long have I got, doctor?” The Corpus Hippocratum of early Greek medicine underlined just that: “I hold that it is an excellent thing for a doctor to practise forecasting. For indeed, if he discover and declare unaided by the side of his patients their present, past and future circumstances, he will be able to inspire greater confidence that he knows about illness, and thus people will decide to put themselves in his care.”Why is it so difficult to prognosticate?Every patient is different, every disorder is different, every disorder within a disorder is different. People are unpredictable, their illness even more so. But there exist other subtleties that are harder to admit to.Jules Montague is a consultant neurologist at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, and an honorary consultant neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square.http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/jun/02/doctors-predict-patient-die-prognosis-wronglast_img read more

Southall eye QPR’s proposed training base

first_imgThe owners of Southall FC want to redevelop the Warren Farm site QPR are hoping to turn into their new training ground.West London Sport revealed last month that the facility near Osterely Park is Rangers’ preferred option for an improved training base.The club plan to leave their current headquarters at Harlington later this year and a number of possible alternatives have been identified.AdChoices广告Warren Farm is their first choice but Southall, who play in the Middlesex County Premier League, are backed by wealthy local investors and also intend to submit proposals to Ealing Council.And they are expected to argue that their plans for a state-of-the-art complex would be of greater benefit to the local community.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img