JUST IN: ‘We remain committed to anti-doping’ … JAAA explains IAAF ‘no vote’

first_imgThe Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) has moved to assure that its decision not to vote on constitutional changes at the recent IAAF Special Congress in Monaco does not suggest any discord in it’s solidarity with the fight against doping in the sport. In a release issued late Friday night, the JAAA pointed to what it described as an unprecedented requisite for member federations to vote en masse on 15 proposals, which were to be implemented across two constitutions and executed at the beginning of the years 2017 and 2019. The release, which was signed by General Secretary Garth Gayle, outlines that there was no opportunity to examine individual points and that the JAAA would have preferred further discussions on five particular proposals included in the 15–point plan put forward by the IAAF at the Congress. Among the Jamaican authority’s grouses is the decision to alter the composition of the Council to reflect gender balance. The JAAA contends that this decision was taken by a small group of individuals and needed further discussion at the Congress level. The JAAA also argues that the current age limit of 70 years old, which was agreed in the 2015 constitution, was removed without any discussion at Congress, and also noted their discontent that committees would no longer be elected by Congress but would instead be appointed under the new plan. Other issues raised by the JAAA include term limits. “Term limits were already agreed to and included in the 2015 constitution. In this new document, the three-term maximum period is still included, but would no longer apply to the existing council members who could serve until 2027 if re-elected. Some of these members have already served four terms,” read the JAAA’s response. The organisation also argues that the Council’s Executive Board would be drastically changed without full discussion among member federations. It is against these issues and the fact that they could not vote on individual points that the JAAA says it decided to not cast a vote at all. “First and foremost, the member countries were not asked to vote on any one issue. There was a list of 15 different proposals contained in two constitutions which Congress was asked to ‘Rubber Stamp’ (vote for without amendment). This in itself was unprecedented. We know of no other time in the 104-year history of the IAAF that federations had to vote for a series of proposals as a unit. We would have preferred for items to be separated, discussed and voted on individually,” read the JAAA statement. “The JAAA is also keen to point out that at no point were we against any changes that would see tighter restrictions against drug cheats. Our president Dr Warren Blake’s introduction to the JAAA executive was as a drug tester and the Federation has always opposed doping in sports and have consistently fought to eliminate doping in sport,” the release added. The IAAF was forced into change on the back of the uncovering of a massive doping and corruption scandal that rocked the international body. New IAAF president Sebastian Coe, who replaced Lamine Diack, who is at the centre of the scandal, has  led a charge to clean up the sport and return its credibility. At the base of that effort is a 15-point plan that included anti-doping, regulation and administrative changes that is hoped will lift the sport. Coe’s proposals were overwhelmingly welcomed with 95 per cent of the member federations voting in favour of a constitutional reform at the Congress, which took place on December 3.last_img read more

Three full grown sandalwood trees axed& taken away

first_imgCoimbatore, Sept 22 (PTI): Three fully grown sandalwood trees were axed and taken out by some persons from a private farm at Podanur here, police said. Shanmugam, who was growing three 20 foot tall sandalwood trees, notice the axed trees when he went to his farm this morning. Based on his complaint, a case was registered, police said. Some days back, two sandalwood trees had been axed from the roadside at Race Course area in the heart of the city. An alert security guard of a star hotel there had prevented the miscreanst from taking it away. PTI NVM APR APRlast_img

YEDAI Project Manager Highlights Importance of Youth Creativity

first_img Manager for the Government’s Youth Employment in Digital and Animation Industries (YEDAI) Project, Margery Newland, says Jamaica’s economic growth and development are, to some extent, grounded in the creativity of the nation’s youth, particularly as it relates to job creation. Story Highlights Noting that the society has, in the past, been hamstrung by the belief that young people were obliged to pursue careers in traditional professions, such as education, law and medicine, Mrs. Newland said the view has changed in relation to the current generation which has “no such limitations”. “Your only limitations, I think, is where you restrict your imagination (and) creativity…Your responsibility is to use your imagination to the fullest possible extent that you can, to think and work creatively (in doing) things in new ways that show you are able to improvise,” she told the young participants at the fair. Manager for the Government’s Youth Employment in Digital and Animation Industries (YEDAI) Project, Margery Newland, says Jamaica’s economic growth and development are, to some extent, grounded in the creativity of the nation’s youth, particularly as it relates to job creation.Noting that the society has, in the past, been hamstrung by the belief that young people were obliged to pursue careers in traditional professions, such as education, law and medicine, Mrs. Newland said the view has changed in relation to the current generation which has “no such limitations”.She was speaking at the Scientific Research Council’s (SRC) National Science and Technology Fair awards ceremony, held at the Spanish Court Hotel, New Kingston, on Tuesday (June 12).“Your only limitations, I think, is where you restrict your imagination (and) creativity…Your responsibility is to use your imagination to the fullest possible extent that you can, to think and work creatively (in doing) things in new ways that show you are able to improvise,” she told the young participants at the fair.Mrs. Newland also emphasised that the society’s adults and elders have a responsibility “to encourage your creativity and provide mentorship and access to the technology that will help you to succeed. These ingredients are the things that are going to turn your dreams into practical reality”.Meanwhile, she said the high level of creativity and enthusiasm exhibited by youngsters participating in the fair is “very heartening,” and is a testimonial to the hard work by the SRC in organising the initiative.Noting the emergence of the local animation industry, Mrs. Newland said ongoing developments are positioning the sector to the point where persons, especially young people, will be able to leverage its benefits to their advantage.“Everybody is interested in and wants to do animation… which captures people’s imagination,” she said.For his part, SRC Executive Director, Dr. Cliff Riley, said the agency prides itself in being engaging and relevant through activities such as the fair.“As we look on Jamaica’s future and the developmental plans to make (it) the place of choice to live, work, raise families and do business, there is no way we can achieve that without a well-educated population… that has scientists, problem-solvers and innovators. This is where our students (come in) because they are the solution persons (and) problem-solvers of our future,” he argued.In this regard, the Executive Director praised the teachers facilitating the students’ development, noting that many of them serve as mentors in providing the youngsters with the necessary guidance and inspiration designed to steer them towards making the correct choices regarding their future.“Teachers, we really thank you. You are the reasons why we are where we are (as a nation)… because you are the ones who have transformed our lives. When I see how our students are thinking, I am convinced that we don’t have a major problem in terms of the future of science. Once we are able to support our students… our innovators… we will come up with real solutions (for the challenges Jamaica faces),” he added.More than 350 students and teachers from 20 primary, secondary and tertiary institutions participated in the one-day fair, which featured 36 projects entered for cash and other prizes totalling over $1 million.The entries were developed in the areas of agriculture; food and agro-processing; energy; information and communications technology and electronics, with special focus on cybersecurity, health and safety, and sports/athletics.Seaview Primary School, Vere technical High School and Northern Caribbean University topped the respective categories.The National Science and Technology Fair, which was staged in collaboration with YEDAI and several other partner entities, aims to identify, produce and commercialise products and services geared at improving national growth and development.last_img read more