Gibson/McCook Relays eliminates dilemma

first_imgAll season, track and field fans have had a dilemma. With the JAAA schedule packed on every Saturday from the start of the year, hard choices have been made. If you saw the slip-surge 10.44-second run by Calabar High School’s Christopher Taylor at the Camperdown Classic, it meant you missed the determined 52.4 4x400m anchor leg by Junelle Bromfield for STETHS at the Western Relays. Choosing either one meant almost certainly missing the 51.91-metre record discus heave by Excelsior throws princess Shanice Love at the King of the Rings at the Antrim-Mountain View Avenue-based institution. That dilemma disappears on Saturday with the Gibson/McCook Relays. As is customary, there are no other meets on the JAAA schedule on the day when the Gibson/McCook Relays presents a feast for sprint fans. First staged as the Gibson Relays in 1973, the meet is a festival of speed. The 4×100-metre relay is at the foundation of the meet, with preparatory, primary, secondary and tertiary student-athletes all attempting to move their batons around the National Stadium track at high speed. Bordered by the meet-opening and meet-closing 4x400m relays, Gibson/McCook also has competitions in the 4x200m, 4x800m, the sprint medley and selected individual events. Jamaica has always loved the sprints, so while other meets have come and gone, the Relays has retained its appeal. Many view it as a prelude to the ISSA Boys and Girls’ Championships and use it as an indicator for the results of that high-energy high-school meet. Hence, the core of the support of the Gibson/McCook has long come from past students of the champion teams in the land. With no scheduling dilemma to split the attentions of the fan base, this Saturday should be no different. In recent years, interest has been boosted by the presence of superstars who have foregone the traditional move to the United States of America to study and train. This has given fans an early-season glance at Usain Bolt, Asafa Powell, Brigitte Foster-Hylton and the like. Very few have the opportunity to see them at the Olympics or the World Championships, so it’s a day aficionados cherish. Bolt has been a brilliant source of speed and excitement. His Racers team holds the men’s 4x100m record at a phenomenal 38.08 seconds. That was at the 2010 renewal, when the tall man also zipped through a 4x400m anchor leg in 44.2 seconds in vain. Last year, he made the news worldwide for a race his Racers team lost by inches, the men’s 4x100m to the University of Technology. Relays are the team event of athletics. It takes co-operation to pilot the baton, from start to finish, safely and quickly enough to win. The speed, the fine margins for error, and the excitement, has kept fans on the edge of their seats and on their feet during each of the previous 39 stagings of the event. Don’t be surprised if it happens again on Saturday. – Hubert Lawrence has made notes at trackside since 1980.last_img read more

Condo project designs OK’d

first_imgGLENDALE – The Glendale Redevelopment Agency voted 3-2 Tuesday to approve preliminary designs for a 16-story condo project on the southwest corner of Wilson Avenue and Orange Street. The project, which the agency would need to officially approve later, would have 162 units. Last month, the agency approved initial designs for a 24-story condo project in the 600 block of Central Avenue. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Naomi Ruele: Botswana’s Olympic medal swimming hopeful

first_img15 July 2016Meet Naomi Ruele, #Botswana’s first Olympic swimmer #TeamBotswana #Rio2016 ?? pic.twitter.com/33kwCaIH0B— Botswana (@Botswana) July 13, 2016Botswana is going Olympics-mad over its new swimming sensation, Naomi Ruele. The 19-year-old is the first swimmer from Botswana to qualify for the Olympics.Ruele, who currently swims for Florida International University in the US, qualified for the Rio Games in March this year, setting a personal best of 26.07 seconds in the 50m freestyle qualifier.During her time in the US, Ruele has won seven gold medals at the most recent C-USA Championships, the country’s top collegiate swimming competition. She set two records and was the top swimmer of the event.Ruele was recently named the Junior Female Sportsperson of the Year by the Botswana National Sports Council. It noted her remarkable achievements in the pool as well inspiring young Batswana to take an interest in the sport.Swimming Sensation Naomi Ruele Bags 7 Medals! –> https://t.co/0I9jOSAbGG #BotswanaYouthMagazine pic.twitter.com/yEjsX5VOIu— Botswana Youth Mag (@BotswanaYouth) March 17, 2016She will join the rest of the Botswana Olympic team made up of current African Games 400m champion Isaac Makwala and London Olympics 2012 800m silver medallist Nijel Amos.For the first time Botswana will have more than one female in their Olympic team. Track athletes Lydia Jele and Christine Botlogetswe will also join Ruele in Rio de Janeiro. Until now, 400m sprinter Amantle Montsho had been the only female Batswana Olympian, competing at the 2004, 2008 and 2012 Games.Heats for the Rio 2016 50m freestyle event begin on 11 August 2016 at the Barra da TijucaAquatics Stadium.Source: This is AfricaWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

FCC Report Finds Better Broadband Needed for Schools and Libraries

first_imgaudrey watters However, nearly 80% of all survey respondents say their broadband connections do not fully meet their current needs. 55% say that slow connection speed is the primary reason their needs aren’t met. 39% says that cost of service is the major barrier to meeting their Internet needs. 27% cite installation costs as the barrier. Rural schools and libraries, in particular, struggle to provide adequate bandwidth to their users.What Are E-Rate Recipients Using Broadband For?Email tops the list of the most-used app by E-rate users. 98% of respondents say that’s what Internet access is regularly used for and 69% say it’s the most essential app. For libraries, online reference materials are the most important and most used app. 86% of library staff and patrons regularly use online reference materials, and 62% say it’s the most essential tool they access online.Schools and libraries both indicate that they see usage increasing. For example, 56% of all E-rate survey respondents say they plan on expanding their usage of digital textbooks in the next 2 years, and 45% say they plan to implement or expand their use of handheld devices for educational purposes. Currently, the average student-to-computer ratio of those schools responding to the survey is 5.86 to 1.According to the FCC, this data will help the agency make better policy decisions for the E-rate program. The FCC has made better broadband access one of its major goals. The FCC has released a report on the state of broadband connectivity at those schools and libraries that receive funds from the federal E-rate program. The E-rate program provides more than $2.25 billion in funding annually in order to offer discounts for schools and libraries so that they can obtain affordable telecommunications services and Internet access.The report is based on data from a survey conducted in 2010 that looks at broadband usage in schools and libraries. The survey found that almost all respondents have some form of broadband connection to at least one facility. Just 2% use satellite and 3% use dial-up in order to access the Internet.Most schools and libraries that responded have Internet speeds greater than 3 Mbps (55%). 10% have speeds greater than 100 Mbps. More than half of the school districts that responded (60%) say they subscribe to a fiber optic connection. Private schools are more than twice as likely as public schools to have either cable (31% to 16%) or DSL (29% to 16%). And 66% of respondents say they provide some wireless connectivity for students, staff and library patrons. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#E-Learning#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts last_img read more

Solar Hot Air Collectors

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img A solar hot air collector is basically a black box with glass on one side. Instead of heating fluid that circulates through tubing, a solar hot air collector is like a parked car. When the sun shines on the collector, the air inside gets hot. A solar hot air collector usually includes a hot air duct connection at the top and a return-air duct connection at the bottom. To improve efficiency, most solar hot air collectors have a black metal baffle or screen behind the glass that allows air flow on both sides.Several manufacturers sell solar hot air collectors, including Your Solar Home of Aurora, Ontario (manufacturer of the SolarSheat collector) and Environmental Solar Systems of Methuen, Mass. (manufacturer of the SunMate collector). The SolarSheat 1500GS measures 43″ x 87″ (a little smaller than a sheet of plywood); it sells for $1,150 (without a fan) or $1,650 (with a PV-powered fan). The SunMate is smaller; it measures 34″ x 77″. Equipped with a thermostatically controlled 100-cfm fan (“turns on at 110°F and off at 90°F”), the SunMate sells for about $1,590.These days, this type of solar collector is usually installed vertically on a south-facing wall. This makes sense, since vertical installation takes advantage of low sun angles during the winter. Manufacturers usually advise installers to drill a couple of 5-inch diameter (or larger) holes in the wall, penetrating the siding, sheathing, insulation, and drywall.One of these holes is used for the hot air duct, and the other for the return air duct. These ducts terminate at indoor grilles installed on the drywall. In most cases, the hot air duct includes an inline DC fan that is powered by a wall cube transformer or a small PV module. The fan is usually controlled by a thermostat.During the summer, when heat… last_img read more

a month agoMan City chiefs see Van ­Bronckhorst as Guardiola successor

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City chiefs see Van ­Bronckhorst as Guardiola successorby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveGiovanni van ­Bronckhorst has been handed an access-all-areas role at Manchester City.The Mirror says City approached former Feyenoord coach Van Bronckhorst – who has signed a contract that has put him on the payroll.The plan is for him to remain in Manchester if it proves a good fit.Pep Guardiola’s contract with City expires in the summer of 2021.And after seeing rivals Manchester United flounder in the six years since Sir Alex Ferguson retired, the Spanish executives who run the club for Sheikh Mansour want to put a succession plan in place.Van Bronckhorst will spend the next year getting to know the inner workings of the club that has become the dominant force in English football over the last decade.He is currently working alongside close friend Brian Marwood, City’s highly-influential Football Administration Officer. last_img read more

Dak Prescott Should Start Ignoring Dez Bryant

Most damningly, Prescott’s passer rating collapses when he targets Bryant — the opposite of what is supposed to happen with a No. 1 wide receiver. When throwing to Bryant, Prescott is 53-for-103 for 578 yards, with four TDs and three picks. That’s a 69.2 rating, which would rank 35th in the NFL, between C.J. Beathard and Tom Savage.In Elliott’s absence, things have gotten even worse. Prescott has a 54.4 rating when throwing to Bryant, and Dallas has scored just 22 combined points in three straight losses — the first team to score fewer than 10 points in each of three straight games since the 2009 Browns.Bryant, an elite deep-ball weapon in his prime, is now completely useless downfield, with just one reception on a pass thrown over 20 yards from scrimmage all year. Between 2012 and 2014, he averaged nearly 10 such grabs per season (29 total). It’s not like he’s wide open on short passes either. That was never more apparent than it was on Thanksgiving, when Bryant’s 0.8 yards of separation on targets was lowest among all wideouts who got at least five targets, according to the NFL’s Next Gen Stats.While Bryant just turned 29 in November, he has not only endured injury but also taken constant punishment as one of the game’s most physical receivers. He has been one of the league’s most vocal receivers about getting his share of volume, so if Prescott does start looking to his other targets more frequently, there’s no doubt that he will hear about. But it may be worth it: On all non-Bryant passes, Prescott’s rating of 95.3 is well above the NFL average. When Cowboys’ running back Ezekiel Elliott was finally forced to serve his six-game suspension for domestic violence, the logical assumption was that quarterback Dak Prescott would lean more heavily on the third member of the Dallas troika, star receiver Dez Bryant. But the Cowboys offense has floundered in the ensuing three weeks, and one of the reasons is becoming obvious: Bryant has fallen into an abyss so deep that he’s not merely no longer great, he has actually become one of the least efficient wide receivers in football.The most disconcerting thing about Bryant’s precipitous drop in production is that it’s not because he’s not getting opportunities. The Cowboys and NFL sophomore Prescott are throwing Bryant the ball — peppering him with 103 targets, the sixth-highest number in the league according to ESPN TruMedia.This high volume of looks would make good sense if Bryant were the offensive force we last saw for extended stretches way back in 2014, when Tony Romo was his quarterback. But the former All-Pro wide receiver has not been the same since he broke his foot in 2015. His horrible inefficiency that year was attributed to his coming back too soon and then playing without Romo, who was injured, and instead getting targets from one of the most inept casts of backup quarterbacks ever assembled. His 2016 season was supposed to be an awakening. But even with hyper-efficient Prescott at the controls, Bryant was nowhere near peak form. He hauled in 52.1 percent of his targets compared with 62.6 percent through 2014. And he converted just 57 percent of all the air yards on passes thrown to him into actual receiving yards, versus 74.6 percent prior to his injury.Still, Bryant flashed enough brilliance late in the year and in the postseason to lead Cowboys fans to think they were heading into this season with a legitimate weapon. Instead, Bryant is among the lowest-rated receivers in key efficiency metrics like catch rate (73rd out of 78 qualifying wide receivers with at least two catches per team game), receiving yards per target (75th), and receiving yards as a percentage of air yards (72nd).1According to data from ESPN TruMedia. Here’s every wide receiver with 22 or more receptions this season, broken up by targets and receiving yards. read more

Womens basketball Freshmen getting adjusted to college life

The jump from high school to college can be a difficult adjustment for any student, and student-athletes are no exception.The Ohio State women’s basketball team features three true freshmen this season. Forward Tori McCoy and guards Kiara Lewis and Jensen Caretti are currently going through the same adaptation process many new college students face.“It was a struggle starting off my first day,” McCoy said. “My first week, actually, I was just confused about everything.”The jump can be tough for students from small towns, especially at a large institution like OSU. Caretti is originally from Clarington, Ohio, a town which, according to the 2015 U.S. census, had a population of just 380.“It’s a big environmental change,” Caretti said. “I never expected to go this big in the first place.”The path to OSU was different for all three. Lewis attended Whitney M. Young High School in Chicago, the same school that produced teammate Linnae Harper.Freshman Kiara Lewis (23), Tori McCoy (0) and Jensen Caretti (33) pose for a photo together donning their Ohio state uniforms. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio State AthleticsDuring her senior year of high school, Lewis averaged 24.4 points, 5.3 assists, 7.0 rebounds and 3.2 steals per game. Her efforts landed her the Gatorade Player of the Year award in the state of Illinois.Ranked as the 24th best prospect in the 2016 class by ESPN, Lewis was recruited by the likes of Texas A&M and Tennessee, but said that OSU was the best fit.“I felt that the coaches were very caring and that the team was going to be pretty good,” Lewis said. “We could possibly do something big.”McCoy is a product of Saint Thomas More High School in Champaign, Illinois. She was a finalist for the Naismith Player of the Year award during her senior year, a campaign which saw her average 20.7 points and 8.7 rebounds per game. ESPN ranked her as the 10th best player in her class.McCoy’s list of college options included Baylor, Tennessee and South Carolina, but she said that she felt a different level of comfort with OSU.“The players, they made me feel welcome and that’s a big thing for me,” McCoy said. “I just enjoyed being around the girls.”Caretti was named Ms. Basketball for Ohio after her senior year at River High School in Hannibal, Ohio. She averaged 25.0 points, 11.0 boards and carried a shooting percentage of over 58 percent that year, leading to an ESPN ranking of 31st nationally.Caretti also excelled at volleyball in high school. She said that she considered playing collegiate volleyball instead of basketball, but the opportunities were far greater for basketball.“I didn’t get any big offers like I did for basketball,” Caretti said. “I never played on a travel team for volleyball, so I didn’t really get any looks because our school was so small.”Louisville and South Carolina were among the schools who looked at Caretti for basketball, but the guard said her decision to become a Buckeye was made due to the team’s recent resurgence and the fact that the school was close to home.Now, all three players have joined forces in Columbus and are helping each other get acclimated to life in college.“We actually became close really fast,” McCoy said. “They are always pushing me and I’m always pushing them too.”The tight-knit group remains together on and off the court.“We all come to the gym together, leave together — stuff like that,” Lewis said.As they settle in, McCoy, Lewis and Caretti are looking ahead to what they believe could be a special season at OSU.“I think we are going to go pretty far this year,” McCoy said. “We’re looking pretty good and we’re doing better in practices every day.”The end goal for the incoming players is obvious: Win it all.“Hopefully, we can expect a national championship,” Caretti said. “We are a great team.” read more

Ironic reunion former OSU quarterback Joe Germaine coaching in Arizona

Arizona State linebacker Paul Reynolds stepped onto the field for the final drive of the 1997 Rose Bowl against Ohio State as confident as could be. The Sun Devils had just scored a touchdown to go up 17-14 with less than two minutes to play, and the Buckeyes were sending out an unproven sophomore quarterback to lead them on their final drive. “Pat Tillman (Reynolds’ ASU teammate) and I saw this baby-faced guy with big ear pads come running onto the field,” Reynolds said. “We looked at each other and said, ‘We’ve got this in the bag.’ Unfortunately, we know how that turned out.” Joe Germaine led a 65-yard game-winning drive, culminating with a 5-yard touchdown pass to receiver David Boston, to beat the Sun Devils, 20-17. Thirteen years later, Reynolds, the athletic director at Queen Creek High School in Queen Creek, Ariz., hired the “baby-faced” quarterback with “big ear pads” to be his varsity football coach. “My first day in the weight room, we took a photo of the kids and me,” said Joe Germaine, 1997 Rose Bowl MVP. Reynolds “had it PhotoShopped and put me in a Sun Devils shirt. Naturally, I did the same to him, only putting him in a Buckeyes jersey.” Germaine played in the NFL for five seasons and has had multiple stints in the Arena Football League since graduating from OSU in 1998. In his first season as coach, Germaine is 5-1, with a triple-overtime victory over the defending Arizona Class 4A Division II state champions. “I’ve always had a passion for the game,” Germaine said. “I loved practicing. I loved going to meetings. I just loved learning the game.” Hired by Reynolds in March, Germaine was a quarterback coach at Basha High School in Arizona for three years and an assistant at Mesa Community College for two years before coming to Queen Creek. “I got into coaching once I started playing Arena Football,” Germaine said. “The schedule was different from the NFL, and I had the time to do it.” The Arena Football League plays its games from April to August instead of September through January, as the NFL does. “It’s a thrill, being a head coach,” he said. “I’m seeing the game from a different vantage point.” Germaine played for OSU from 1996–1998. Known for his prolific passing and unflappable composure, he threw for 6,370 yards, third-most in OSU history, and 56 touchdowns, second-most in OSU history. Reynolds said the unflappable composure is still there. “In the triple-overtime win, he didn’t look nervous for one second,” he said. “He has such a calm demeanor.” Queen Creek won the triple-overtime thriller 49-42, securing the game with a goal-line stand in the third extra period. “The kids definitely take after their coach,” Reynolds said. “They’re high school kids, you know. You expect them to make mistakes, but no one lost their composure and they held on for the win.” Germaine said he holds high expectations for his players. “We have very high standards on and off the field,” Germaine said. “We teach accountability, and the kids have just been great.” Against Illinois on Oct. 2, OSU quarterback Terrelle Pryor passed Germaine for seventh on the “all-time total offense” list at OSU. Germaine had 6,094 yards of total offense as a Buckeye. “I think Terrelle is a terrific talent,” Germaine said. “I expect him to be one of the all-time greats at Ohio State once it’s all said and done.” He said some of the criticism Pryor faced last season as a sophomore was unfair. Germaine said everyone has to mature and credited the OSU coaching staff for helping Pryor develop his game. “Great coaches make great players,” he said. Jim “Tressel and quarterbacks coach Nick Siciliano are great teachers of the game. It’s easy to see why Pryor is where he’s at with coaches like that.” Germaine said his coach at OSU, John Cooper, taught him a lot about the game. “He was fair and treated his players with respect,” he said. “I try to do those same things for my players.” Understandably, many of Queen Creek’s players are Arizona State fans. Queen Creek is only about 30 miles from the ASU campus. “It’s funny,” Germaine said. “We have an ASU-OSU thing going on. They razz me a little bit and I razz them a little bit, but they know that I’m a Buckeye, and there’s no changing that.” Reynolds said Germaine is a great coach and is only going to get better. “He’s been doing a great job,” he said. “I don’t think the kids realize what they’ve got, but I sure do. Hopefully, we can get him to stick around here a while.” It might be tough for Reynolds to keep the former OSU star at Queen Creek. Germaine said he would love to coach at the collegiate level. He even hinted at the possibility of coaching at his alma mater. “Who knows?” he said. “Maybe a few years down the road, Tressel will be hiring and I’ll come back to Ohio State. OSU has a special place in my heart and that’d be something.” Although he said he loves coaching, he still has a desire to play. “I wish more than anything to get an opportunity to play again,” he said. “I keep in shape, hoping that chance will come — you never know.” As for the rest of Queen Creek’s season, Germaine said they’ve got one of the tougher schedules in the state, but that doesn’t mean his goals aren’t set high. “You can imagine how we want to finish,” he said. read more

New Ohio State pistol coach Emil Milev shoots for the next level

Emil Meliv, now Ohio State’s pistol coach, takes aim at the International Shooting Sport Federation World Cup at Fort Benning in Georgia on March 28, 2014. Credit: Courtesy of USA ShootingAfter competing in six Olympic games, Emil Milev has a new challenge ahead of him: being head coach of the Ohio State pistol team as it prepares for another triumphant season.The pistol team won last year’s women’s aggregate national championships and the open team intercollegiate championship for the third season in a row. Milev said he is looking forward to building on the success of an already highly decorated program and “taking it to the next level.”“The name is what led me here — it’s the best in the country,” Milev said. “I think the team and I can work together, and this collaboration can be beneficial to the program. I want to give them a lot of opportunities in the sport and in life.” The Bulgarian-born Milev competed for his home country in four Olympic games between 1992 and 2004 and earned the silver medal in the 1996 Atlanta games, before moving to the U.S. in 2004 and becoming a U.S. citizen in 2009. He competed for the U.S. in the 2012 London and 2016 Rio games. Milev also is a six-time World Championship competitor, earning the silver medal in 1994. Milev began the sport of pistol as a hobby, going with friends to the shooting range. He began intercollegiate competition, eventually working toward qualifying for the World Championship and Olympics.“I felt hungry for the competitiveness, and started practicing harder, reading books and learning more about the sport,” Milev said. “Never in high school did I think I would be at six Olympic games and even receiving a medal. I just love it so much. I never dreamed it would be my life, but it slowly turned out to be that way. It’s very rewarding.”A main goal of Milev’s is to have the program focus more to the Olympic-styled events he knows best.“The [National Rifle Association] is making a few changes in their competitive events, but right now only three collegiate events pistol shooters participate in are Olympic,” Milev said. “I would like to see the program go in this direction, and eventually see athletes coming here to contribute to our team along with our athletes competing and winning in international matches in the years to come.”Pistol has multiple events in the men’s and women’s divisions, depending on the size of the gun used and the distance from the target. The type of competitions also vary in how fast the shooter must get the shots off. Most of the sport, as described by Milev, is a balance between controlling the fine-tuned machine to work with the shooter and the mental focus needed to be successful.“To truly appreciate pistol, you have to try it,” Milev said. “Even just learning more about it, asking our athletes about what they do and how they must train, people will understand this is truly a sport.”Sophomore Anthony McCollum, who earned the silver medal in last year’s national open-air competition, said Milev has already made an impact on the Buckeyes, though he was hired less than three weeks ago. The team competes on October 27-28 at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where it will face Army, Coast Guard, North Dakota State and Utah to begin the season. “We ask for the Ohio State community to celebrate with us, there’s a lot of talent on this team and you can expect lots of wins this year,” Milev said. read more