Top Donegal restaurants and chefs scoop Irish Restaurant Awards

first_imgIf you’re looking to enjoy the crème de la crème the next time you dine out, then the winners of the Ulster Irish Restaurant Awards will be a good place to start.Local restaurants, pubs, food heroes and chefs enjoyed great success at the regional finals last night in Monaghan, which was attended by over 450 restaurant owners and staff.The awards covered a wide range of venues and the winners from each of Ulster’s nine counties. Harvey’s Point on Lough Eske was a big winner on the night as the team picked up four titles. The Donegal winners were: Best Restaurant – The Lemon Tree Restaurant, LetterkennyBest Chef – Colin McKee of Harvey’s PointBest Restaurant Manager –  Orhan Erinc of Harvey’s PointBest Customer Service – Harvey’s PointBest Hotel and Guesthouse Restaurant – Rathmullan HouseBest Gastro Pub –  The House Gastro Pub, Donegal TownBest Café – The Salty Fox, BundoranPub of the Year – The Rusty Mackerel, TeelinBest Wine Experience – Harvey’s PointBest Newcomer – Fisk Seafood Bar, DowningsBest World Cuisine – Chandpur Restaurant, Donegal TownBest “Free From” – Wholegreen Healthfood LetterkennyBest Kids Size Me – Mill Park Hotel, Donegal TownBest Local Food Hero – Mairead Anderson of Killybegs Seafood ShackBest Emerging Irish Cuisine – Foyle Hotel and Restaurant, MovilleBest Casual Dining – Olde Glen Bar, GlenThose who won at county level will progress to the All-Ireland event on the 13th May with the restaurants that have already won in Leinster, where they will all compete for the Regional and All-Ireland titles.Speaking at the Ulster Regional Finals in Hillgrove Hotel, Monaghan, Adrian Cummins, Chief Executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland (RAI) said: “Now in their 11th year, the Irish Restaurant Awards continue to showcase the incredible food that is on offer in the cafes, pubs and restaurants of Ireland, as well as recognising the teams behind these establishments and the hard work and dedication that they put in. With well over 80,000 nominations received from the public this year, the standard for the judging process was higher than ever.“Ireland may be a small country, but it boasts everything from fine dining to high quality gastropubs, from the comfort of traditional Irish food to exploring the world though exotic world cuisine, the Irish restaurant industry has much to offer. We have an appreciation for what we eat and where our food comes from, as well as the dedication of those working in the food industry”.   Top Donegal restaurants and chefs scoop Irish Restaurant Awards was last modified: March 13th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

The Life and Death of Oxygen

first_imgThe oxygen in our atmosphere has the energy equivalent of 20 thousand billion billion hydrogen bombs.  To maintain the oxygen level in our atmosphere, that amount of energy would have to be spent in manufacturing molecular oxygen every 4 million years (a thousandth the assumed age of the earth).    Now that we have your attention, let’s think about the role of oxygen and life.  The statistics above were estimated by Paul G. Falkowski and Yukio Isozaki in Science this week.1  Unlike nitrogen, which is inert, oxygen is lively – it oxidizes, or burns things – not only in fire, but in cells, where the element must be handled gingerly by molecular machines to avoid damage.  That’s also why you take antioxidants in your food.  Keeping oxygen away from the primordial soup at the origin of life is understandably a serious problem (10/20/2008).    Evolutionary biologists do not believe earth’s oxygen is primordial (i.e., that it formed when the earth formed).  They believe it was generated by living organisms when they evolved to use oxygen for electron capture in metabolism.  This conveniently keeps oxygen out of the picture at the origin of life (though some atmospheric oxygen forms spontaneously by the dissociation of water).  Oxygen could also be sequestered from the air in continental rocks: silicates, carbonates and sulfates.    Oxygen reached levels of 10 to 30% only in the last 550 million years, evolutionists say.  Its 4-million-year lifetime is 0.4% the estimated 1 billion year lifetime of the atmosphere’s most abundant gas, nitrogen.  How did oxygen, with its relatively short lifetime, become the second most abundant gas in the atmosphere?  “The story is not as simple as it might first appear,” said Falkowski and Isozaki.  One has to calculate when and how it was first generated, and how it persists in its high concentration.    Some oxygen is continuously formed by the breakup of water molecules by ultraviolet light in the atmosphere (at least till ozone forms and shields the upper atmosphere from excess UV).  If biology is the source, how does life produce it from water and minerals? The overwhelming source of O2 on Earth is photobiological oxidation of water; neither the evolution nor the mechanism of this process are completely understood.  Apparently it arose once in a single clade of bacteria and was then appropriated via a single event, in which one cell engulfed another (endosymbiosis) to form a new symbiotic organism.  The latter became the progenitor of all photosynthetic eukaryotes, including algae and higher plants.    The core of the oxidation machinery is photosystem II, a large protein complex containing four manganese atoms that are photocatalytically oxidized to create electron holes upstream.They stressed that this “arose” once most likely because of the improbability that a “large protein complex” of “oxidation machinery” could arise by chance.  Nevertheless, assuming plants and bacteria produce it, the equation is balanced by the animals that consume it:On time scales of years to millennia, these reactions are closely coupled to the reverse process of respiration, such that net production of O2 is virtually nil.  That is, without burial of organic matter in rocks, there would be very little free O2 in the atmosphere.  Hence, the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis was a necessary but not a sufficient condition to oxidize Earth’s atmosphere.So the second problem is getting molecular oxygen up to the level of 10-30% that has been maintained for 500 million years.  If a small amount is subducted into the mantle by plate tectonics, or captured in stable continental rocks, an atmospheric excess could be built up to a stable concentration without runaway production.  “The balance between burial of organic matter and its oxidation,” they said, “appears to have been tightly controlled over the past 500 million years.”  This balance requires an ongoing process of long-term storage within the earth.  The picture becomes complicated by the fact that volcanoes can re-release oxygen back into the atmosphere.  “The presence of O2 in the atmosphere requires an imbalance between oxygenic photosynthesis and aerobic respiration on time scales of millions of years,” they said; “hence, to generate an oxidized atmosphere, more organic matter must be buried than respired.”    How well do scientists know how oxygen concentration has varied over geologic time?  “Perhaps surprisingly, not very well.”  Comparison of isotopes in carbonates and sulfates provide clues.  They believe the initial oxygen concentration produced by the first photosynthetic bacteria was quite low.  It rose when eukaryotes appeared, and then, according to the evolutionary timeline, became much more abundant in the Neoproterozoic – corresponding to the period just before the Cambrian Explosion.  The eukaryotic oxygen increase would have had to coincide with enhanced subduction in the lithosphere.    Was the Cambrian Explosion a cause or effect of the rise of oxygen?  They suggested the latter: “The burial of large amounts of organic carbon over the past 750 million years is mirrored in a substantial rise in atmospheric O2, which may have triggered the Cambrian explosion of animal life.”    Another balance of geology and biology would have had to occur in the Carboniferous.  The doubling of oxygen production by trees and ferns had to be balanced by “further increases in burial efficiency” they said.  How the continental plates coordinated their behavior with the evolution of plants, they did not say.  Throughout the remainder of earth history, this balance was maintained within comparatively narrow limits – 10 to 23%.  “The relatively narrow range of variability suggests tight controls on the rate of burial and oxidation of organic matter on Earth’s surface.”  They did not say who or what is controlling these rates, other than to say that “the burial of organic carbon is roughly balanced by oxidation and weathering.”    How valid is this story?  They think the broad picture is understood, but “the details remain sketchy” – particularly, how photosynthesis splits water, how oxygen concentration is controlled in the atmosphere.    Could Woodward W. Fischer in Nature help the story?2  How good is the evidence to support the rise of the first photosynthetic bacteria?  “Go back to Archaean time, the interval of Earth’s history between about 4 billion and 2.5 billion years ago,” he began, “and we’re in largely unknown biological territory.”    While Fischer was concerned primarily with debunking claims of eukaryotes too early for comfort (i.e., before the rise of atmospheric oxygen), his report contained reason to doubt the validity of the timeline.  The new evidence may remove an embarrassing puzzle of how photosynthesis could arise 300 million years before the rise of atmospheric oxygen, but “does it close the gap between the morphological and molecular-fossil records of the evolution of eukaryotes?” he asked himself.  He answered himself, “Not yet.”  Other scientists are not conceding the debunking of 2.7-billion-year-old photosynthesis.  A news item about this on Nature News agrees the debate is far from over.    For problems with oxygen at the birth of the solar system, see bullet one of the 09/24/2008 entry.1.  Paul G. Falkowski and Yukio Isozaki, “The Story of O2,” Science, 24 October 2008: Vol. 322. no. 5901, pp. 540-542, DOI: 10.1126/science.1162641.2.  Woodward W. Fischer, “Biogeochemistry: Life before the rise of oxygen,” Nature 455, 1051-1052 (23 October 2008) | doi:10.1038/4551051a.OK; how convinced are you that the evolutionary storytellers are compelled by the evidence to embrace their billions of years saga of a history they cannot observe?  It’s a magical history, in which complex oxidation machines “arise” by some unspecified natural magic.  (Note that if something “arose once,” it is not following a natural law).    Lacking evidence, they can build models that include the natural magic built-in.  By tweaking parameters here and there, and trying to debunk contrary evidence, they can get it to work – sort of.  It continues to amaze them how finely balanced it is.    So much for this space fantasy.  The atmosphere on Darwin’s imaginary world is too rarefied to breathe.  Let’s head back to the real world.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

2015 Junior Goat Show results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion Junior Wether Goat: Paige Pence, Clark Co.Reserve Champion Junior Wether Goat : Zach Johnson, Clinton Co.3. Megan Gibboney, Franklin Co.4. Cami Reveal, Clinton Co.5. Taylor Carr, Athens Co.Numbers continue to climb in the Junior Wether Goat Show with more than 300 entries this year. This is also the first year for an Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition for goats due to sufficient funds being raised at the Sale of Champions.Junior Wether Goat Show resultsHeavyweight Champion: Megan Gibboney, Franklin Co.Heavyweight Reserve Champion: Taylor Carr, Athens Co.Middleweight Champion: Paige Pence, Clark Co.Middleweight Reserve Champion: Taylor Carr, Athens Co.Lightweight Champion: Zach Johnson, Clinton Co.Lightweight Reserve Champion: Cami Reveal, Clinton Co. Junior Dairy Goat resultsAlpineChampion: Drew Buroker, Logan Co.Reserve Champion: Drew Buroker, Logan Co. LamanchaChampion: Alexandrea Stewart, Ross Co.Reserve Champion: Alexandrea Stewart, Ross Co. AOBChampion: Jacob Serio, KnoxReserve Champion: Olivia Serio, Knox Co. NubianChampion: Robert Spitler, Preble Co.Reserve Champion: Robert Spitler, Preble Co. Recorded GradeChampion: Tristan Cox, Hancock CountyReserve Champion: Lauren Davis, Clinton Co. SaanenChampion: Kolton Baer, Trumbull Co.Reserve Champion: Jenna Johnson, Delaware Co. ToggenburgChampion: Robert Spitler, Preble Co.Reserve Champion: Robert Spitler, Preble Co. Cami Reveal, Clinton County, won Class 3 with her lightweight wether. Class 4 Isaac Beal, Miami County, shows his lightweight wether. Class 4 Heather Cade, Delaware County, was the intermediate dairy goat showmanship winner. Here she is helping to show the Lamancha Breeder’s Choice Trio winners in the Open Show with McKinley Roll and Julie Lucas from Delaware County. Drew Buroker, 15, from Logan County, had the Alpine Champion and Reserve Champion in the Junior Dairy Goat Show. This AOB class in the Open show was won by Regina Bauscher with her Nigerian Dwarf in first and Ashley Siferd’s Oberhasli in second. Eli Hollingsworth, from Champaign County, works hard to get his goat positioned for the judge. Katie Egbert from Shelby County won her class in the middleweight division. Olivia McDade form Dark County was the Class 11 class winner. Paige Pence from Clark County had the Middleweight Champion. Taylor Carr from Athens County had the Middleweight Reserve Champion. Heavyweights Heavyweight Reserve Champion: Taylor Carr, Athens Co. Zach Johnson watches the judge.last_img read more

More Bt resistance showing up in corn rootworm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Western corn rootworm is a highly adaptable insect, and it was just a matter of time before we saw resistance to Bt traits designed to protect against root damage.In the Western Corn Belt, growers have noticed many field failures due to heavy rootworm feeding. Most of this research was led by Aaron Gassmann’s laboratory at Iowa State University. In 2011 they discovered resistance to Cry3Bb1 (which may be present in Yieldgard or Genuity traits). In 2014 they discovered resistance to mCry3A (which may be present in Agrisure traits). Now, in 2016, they have discovered resistance to Cry34/35Ab1 (which may be present in Herculex or Optimum traits). For a full list of Bt traits see: http://www.msuent.com/assets/pdf/28BtTraitTable2016.pdf.Remember that Bt against rootworm has only been available since 2003, and, in just 13 years, most of our major tools have been compromised. Currently there is only one trait, eCry3.1Ab (present in Duracade traits), without any published reports of resistance.Luckily for Ohio growers, all these products are still effective against Western rootworms in our state. We have only heard of a few, scattered reports of field failures. Observations from the Western Corn Belt indicate that a lack of rotation greatly increases the risk of Bt resistance. Any field with corn grown from more than three straight years should be inspected for root feeding and proper trait performance. Dig five roots in 10 locations and use the 0-3 node injury scale to rate feeding (see this guide by Dr. Chris DiFonzo @ Michigan State University: http://msuent.com/assets/pdf/42CRWRating.pdf). Now is the perfect time to perform root digs—if you suspect field failures, please contact us at michel.70@osu.edu and tilmon.1@osu.edu or contact your extension educator.  Also remember that crop rotation remains our single, best tactic to prevent Bt resistance from occurring in Ohio.  If crop rotation is not possible, the next best alternative is to rotate different Bt traits each year or consider soil insecticides which are still quite effective. However, we do not see a need or benefit for combining both soil insecticides with Bt in Ohio.last_img read more

The Geocacher’s Guide to Surviving a Zombie Outbreak

first_imgBraiiiiiiinsssssssss! SharePrint RelatedGuard Against Zombie with Geocaching GearNovember 1, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Geocacher vs. Zombie – Who wins?November 12, 2013In “Extreme Geocaching”Post-Apocalyptic geocaching — Red Sands Fort (GC1DVNY) — Geocache of the WeekJune 11, 2015In “Geocache of the Week” In the event of a (potential) zombie apocalypse, being a skilled geocacher might increase your chance of survival. We’ve got your back with this guide to surviving a zombie outbreak:center_img What are your survival tips?Share with your Friends:Morelast_img

In Gurugram, Independents add spice to poll

first_imgKusheshwar Bhagat, 48, has been running a ‘pav bhaji’ stall off Jharsa Road in Part-II of Sector 15 here for more than a decade now. But don’t mistake him for an ordinary street food vendor by the roadside.One of the seven Independent contestants in the fray for the Lok Sabha election in Gurugram, Mr. Bhagat is contesting for the third consecutive time from this parliamentary constituency. He fought two Vidhan Sabha elections earlier. But could never save his deposit.Voters disillusioned“I polled 7,821 votes in 2014 LS election, the highest so far in the four elections,” says Mr. Bhagat, who has moveable assets of around ₹2.5 lakh, besides a Nano car and a house in Delhi. “The voters seem disillusioned with all parties this time. I hope to get around 3 lakh votes… they will vote me to power one day,” says Mr. Bhagat, contesting on the plank of health and education to all.Like him, affordable health and education, development, agrarian crisis, corruption and unemployment are high on the agenda of the Independent candidates in Gurugram. Pawan Kumar, 34, a resident of Gurugram, says he decided to fight the election to raise his voice against lack of jobs and the plight of government schools. “The local youth are not getting employed in the industries in the area. The government schools are in a pitiable condition. Farmers are in distress and the soldiers are dying,” says Mr. Pawan, a graduate, claiming the support of a dozen villages. He says his election symbol, a bucket, will help him strike an instant chord with the voters. He hopes to win with a margin of around one lakh votes.A mini-worldBikaner’s Virender, who claims to have contested five Rajasthan Assembly elections, says that Gurugram is a mini-world with people having come and settled from across the globe. He wants to make it a truly “Millennium City”.Sudesh Kumar of Pataudi, a Scheduled Caste, took the plunge to prepare for the Assembly election later this year. Self-employed, Mr. Sudesh says this Lok Sabha election is a “mock test” for him as he wants to acquaint himself with the election process.Most of these Independent candidates, coming from humble backgrounds, are contesting on shoestring budgets with little money to spare for the canvassing. Mr. Pawan says he is yet to get his campaign material printed and has sought financial support from his father and relatives. He carries his visiting card along and distributes it during his door-to-door campaign.Mr. Bhagat says he spent around ₹15,000 on his campaign in the previous election, but this time he is pinning his hopes on the free publicity through the media. “Every day an article is carried on me in the newspapers. It is enough publicity.I need not spend much on the campaign this time.” says Kusheshwar.Mr. Virender says that he will reach the voters through door-to-door campaign, distributing handbills and send text messages. Mr. Sudesh is active on all popular social media platforms, including Instagram and Facebook, and updates all his canvassing pictures online for the maximum reach.last_img read more