Lecture discusses ‘Mormon moment’

first_img “Right now, there is extraordinary media attention given to Mormons both home and abroad,” he said. “There are three reasons for this; the candidacy of Mitt Romney, the Broadway hit musical “The Book of Mormon,” which is a parody of the religion … and our own media campaign, ‘I am a Mormon’ intended to dispel stereotypes.” The sheer growth of the church and the rising prominence of Latter-day Saints in a wide variety of fields also contribute to the added attention, Porter said. To begin his talk, Porter explained some of the LDS hierarchy and central beliefs. He dispelled a common myth about the church’s founder, Joseph Smith. “We recognize him [Joseph Smith] as a fallible mortal and do not in any sense worship him,” he said. Porter said despite the explosion of growth in the LDS church, Mormons are still very connected.” Our policies and curriculum originate from church headquarters … it helps ensure the church remains one unified body,” he said. “We are a close-knit people, we feel strong bonds to other saints across the world. There exists a global Mormon village.” After explaining some aspects of the church, Porter discussed Mormons and politics. Porter said the 12th article of faith says Mormons believe in being subject to kings, presidents and rulers and honoring and sustaining the law. “We believe the law and government holds men accountable,” he said. The LDS church renounces war and proclaims peace, according to what Jesus said to the prophet Joseph Smith, said Porter. “We believe the defense of family and country is justified, but war is a necessary evil and a last resort,” he said. “If all people believed in Christ, the world would be at peace.” Porter said unlike many believe, the LDS church does not endorse political candidates or policies. “We believe in the separation of denominational influence in politics, religion should not have undue influence in politics,” he said. While the church has sometimes taken a stance on prominent issues, Porter said, it is an issue of what is moral or not moral. “Many of the stances we have taken on political issues are conservative – like abortion or same-gender marriage,” he said. “On the other hand, our stance on illegal immigration is seen as fairly liberal.” Porter said even though Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is a Mormon, the church has not and will not endorsed him, due to church policy. “In this campaign like others, the church has taken no position,” he said. “We’ve done nothing whatsoever to support Mitt Romney.” With the increase in media attention on the faith this primary season, Porter said the church has used it to promote the church in a positive light. “We have sought diligently to correct misconceptions about our beliefs … dispel stereotypes and misinformation about the church,” he said. Contact Anna Boarini at aboari01@saintmarys.edu Tuesday evening, Dr. Bruce Porter, an elder in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) gave a lecture arguing there is currently a “Mormon moment.” Porter is a member of the Quorum of 70, an LDS governing body, and titled his lecture “The Latter-Day Saints come marching in: Mormonism abroad and at home in the 21st century.”last_img read more

Data Protection Bill to be Tabled in September

first_img This was noted by Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, during the recent opening of the $3.5-million Annotto Bay computer resource centre in St. Mary. The Government’s Data Protection Bill, which aims to safeguard the privacy of individuals whose personal information has been documented by entities with whom they interface, is expected to be tabled in September when the Houses of Parliament reconvene following the August summer recess. Story Highlights r. Wheatley, who made the initial announcement during the 2017/18 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives in April, indicated then that the law aimed to govern the collection, regulation, processing, storage, use and disclosure of certain information in physical or electronic form. The Government’s Data Protection Bill, which aims to safeguard the privacy of individuals whose personal information has been documented by entities with whom they interface, is expected to be tabled in September when the Houses of Parliament reconvene following the August summer recess.This was noted by Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, during the recent opening of the $3.5-million Annotto Bay computer resource centre in St. Mary.He said the Bill aims to offer individuals an additional level of security in relation to how institutions treat with their personal information.Dr. Wheatley, who made the initial announcement during the 2017/18 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives in April, indicated then that the law aimed to govern the collection, regulation, processing, storage, use and disclosure of certain information in physical or electronic form.“So, whether it’s the bank… the Government of Jamaica… or any other institution… once you are in possession of someone’s personal information, you must deal with that information in such a manner that offers that person a level of protection and confidence,” the Minister said in Annotto Bay.He also indicated during his Sectoral Debate presentation that the 2015 Cybercrimes Act will be reviewed during the current fiscal year to address concerns regarding how sections of the law are interpreted and enforced.Additionally, the Minister said a new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Bill will also be tabled.While encouraging greater use of ICT, Dr. Wheatley again urged persons and entities to exercise caution when doing so and safeguard themselves against cyberattacks.The Minister also encouraged persons to move away from being mere consumers of technology and become innovators, noting that “we have that inherent capacity”.“We have seen where a number of our young people are gaining employment opportunities within the app development… and in animation,” Dr. Wheatley said.The Annotto Bay computer resource centre, which is situated on the grounds of the St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church, is the 256th computer access point (CAP) developed by the Universal Service Fund (USF), and the ninth established in St. Mary.It is outfitted with 16 desktop computers, one Internet broadband server and supporting network capability, one printer, one projector, and two air-conditioning units.The USF also conducted electricity upgrading on the building housing the centre, which was provided through a partnership between the Church and the Annotto Bay Community Development and Environmental Benefit Society, which applied for the CAP.last_img read more

In the news today Dec 11

first_imgFive stories in the news for Tuesday, Dec. 11———BAIL HEARING CONTINUES TODAY FOR CHINESE EXECA bail hearing continues today in Vancouver for a top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei, who the United States demands be extradited for fraud. The B.C. Supreme Court heard Monday that the U.S. is showing its hostility toward Huawei by speculating the executive has avoided travelling there to dodge charges. The U.S. wants 46-year-old CFO Meng Wanzhou to face allegations of fraud related to the use of its subsidiary Skycom to do business with Iranian telecommunications companies between 2009 and 2014.———ELECTION BILL PASSED IN TIME FOR FALL VOTELegislation aimed at preventing foreign interference and constraining the influence of big money in Canadian elections has been approved by the Senate. Bill C-76 passed in the upper house late Monday on a vote of 54-31 and is expected to receive royal assent later this week. That means the reforms will apply during next year’s federal election campaign. Chief electoral officer Stephane Perrault had warned that the much-delayed bill must go into effect by the end of this year if the independent elections watchdog was to have time to implement the reforms for next year’s campaign.———DEFENCE TO CALL WITNESSES IN STAMPEDER TRIALThe defence lawyer of a man accused of fatally shooting a member of the Calgary Stampeders is expected to call one or two witnesses to court today. Prosecutors wrapped up their case Monday against 21-year-old Nelson Lugela, who is on trial for second-degree murder. He was charged after Mylan Hicks was shot in the chest and abdomen in the early hours of Sept. 25, 2016. Between 15 and 25 members of the football team had been at the bar celebrating a last-minute victory over Winnipeg hours earlier. Testimony has heard there was an altercation over a spilled drink earlier in the evening, which reignited in the parking lot after the club closed.———COALITION AVENIR QUEBEC CAPTURES LIBERAL SEATThe governing Coalition Avenir Quebec has passed its first electoral test since winning the Oct. 1 provincial vote, easily capturing the riding of Roberval left vacant by former Liberal premier Philippe Couillard. With three-quarters of the votes counted in a byelection Monday, Coalition candidate Nancy Guillemette, director of a local mental-health organization, was well ahead with more than 50 per cent of the total. Premier Francois Legault joined Guillemette on stage to celebrate the win. On Twitter he wrote, “Thanks to this victory, we now have 75 elected members. Not bad for a new party!”———GASES BUBBLING OUT OF B.C.’S MOUNT MEAGERA scientist who studies volcanoes says climate change is causing glaciers atop Mount Meager in British Columbia to shrink, increasing the chances of landslides and even a new eruption. Glyn Williams-Jones, from Simon Fraser University, says Mount Meager has been spewing water vapour, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide for about two years. Williams-Jones says the slope of the volcano is moving northwest at the rate of about three centimetres a month, which increases the potential for a landslide. He says if that happens, the change in pressure could destabilize the magma chamber beneath the volcano leading to an eruption.———IN THE NEWS:— Environment Minister Catherine McKenna holds a teleconference to discuss Canada’s international and domestic climate action and provide an update on the ongoing work with partners at COP24.— Matthew Vincent Raymond, accused of killing four people including two city police officers, is due back in court. The court is expected to discuss a further assessment to determine criminal responsibility.— Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale will hold a news conference today on a national security issue after a briefing from officials earlier in the day.The Canadian Presslast_img read more